Top Chemistry Schools in Florida

By | April 29, 2018

If you are going to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry within the state of Florida, then you have come to the right place. On this website, you will find the 7 best chemistry schools in Florida. Please note that these rankings are based on student reviews, graduation rates, and the academic surveys submitted by peer colleges and universities throughout Florida.

  • TRANSPORTHINT: Basic information, such as location, land area, population, capital and nickname of Florida. Also includes industry, economy, climate, geography and history of Florida.

Top Chemistry Schools in Florida

Ranking Graduate Chemistry
1 University of Florida
Department of Chemistry

Address: PO Box 117200, Gainesville, FL 32611-7200
Phone: (352) 392-0541
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://webdev.chem.ufl.edu
2 Florida State University
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Address: Dittmer Building, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4390
Phone: (888) 525-9286
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.fsu.edu
3 University of Miami
Department of Chemistry

Address: 1301 Memorial Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146-0431
Phone: (305) 284-2174
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.as.miami.edu
4 University of South Florida
Department of Chemistry

Address: 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, CHE 205, Tampa, FL 33620-5250
Phone: (813) 974-2144
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://chemistry.usf.edu
5 Florida Atlantic University
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Address: Physical Science Building, PS110, Boca Raton, FL 33431
Phone: (561) 297-3390
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.science.fau.edu
6 Florida Institute of Technology
Chemistry Department

Address: 150 W. University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901
Phone: (321) 674-8046
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://cos.fit.edu
7 Florida International University
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Address: 11200 S.W. Eighth Street, Miami, FL 33199
Phone: (305) 348-6246
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.fiu.edu

Best Chemistry Colleges in Florida

Florida Modern History

During the “second Spanish period” the presence of the mother country in both Floridas, East and West, was insignificant. East Florida became a haven for runaway slaves, and the Seminole Indians who inhabited it increasingly attacked settlements in the state of Georgia located in the north.

In 1814, during the war between the United States and Great Britain, units of the US Army under the command of the future seventh President of the United States, Andrew Jackson, drove the British out of their base in Pensacola.

From 1814 to 1819, the so-called “First Seminole War” lasted, a series of conflicts and clashes between the Seminole Indians and the US army. In 1818, General Jackson led a force of nearly 3,000 soldiers and militiamen, as well as about 1,500 fellow Indians, into Florida. The Americans destroyed the main Seminole force and also captured several British agents, who were later court-martialed for incitement to war and executed.

The First Seminole War clearly showed that Spain was unable to defend its possessions in Florida. In 1819, a treaty (known as the Adams-Onis Treaty) was signed under which Spain ceded Florida to the United States in exchange for the United States relinquishing claims to Texas.

The treaty went into effect in 1821, and on March 30, 1822, the Florida Territory was created. The city of Tallahassee became the capital of the new US territory, and Andrew Jackson became the first governor. Settlers rushed to new lands, but the creation of new settlements and agriculture in Florida was very complicated by constant clashes with the Indians and the fugitive black slaves who assimilated among them, known as the “black Seminoles”.

In 1823, the US government entered into an agreement with several Indian chiefs, according to which the Indians pledged to live peacefully and law-abidingly on a reservation in central Florida, as well as return fugitive slaves, in exchange for providing livestock, food, agricultural implements and cash payments.

In 1830, the US Congress passed the “Indian Removal Act”, the purpose of which was to move the Indians from the southeast of the United States to the then undeveloped lands west of the Mississippi River. The law was signed by Andrew Jackson, who by that time had become the President of the United States.

On May 9, 1832, another treaty was concluded between the government of the United States of America and the Indians. The Indian chiefs pledged to move west if they liked the land on offer. Seven of them in 1833, after inspecting the land offered to them in Arkansas, signed an agreement to move (although after returning to Florida, some of them said that they agreed under pressure). The Seminoles had three years to move, meaning they had to leave Florida by 1835. However, many Indians were not going to leave their native lands, the tension grew and led to the outbreak of the Second Seminole War in 1835.

The first episode of this seven-year series of skirmishes and battles was “The Massacre of Dade”. On December 23, 1835, American soldiers under the command of US Army Major Francis Dane set out from Fort Brook (modern-day Tampa) to Fort King (now the city of Ocala). On December 28, Seminole ambushers destroyed a detachment, out of a hundred and ten Americans, only one survived, while the Indians lost only three people killed, and five more were wounded.

During the Second Seminole War, the leader of the Indians, Osceola, became famous for successfully using guerrilla tactics against units of the regular US army. In 1837, Osceola, who arrived at the negotiations, was captured by the American military, and died three months later in prison from malaria.