Yemen Geography

By | November 27, 2021

Yemen borders Saudi Arabia to the north, Oman to the east, the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean to the south, and the Red Sea to the west.

With regard to surface forms, climate and possible uses, the following landscapes can be distinguished: Along the coast of the Red Sea stretch the plains of the Tihama, which are covered by sand (partly dunes) and gravel, a 30-60 km wide, thinly populated lowland strip with a few fishing villages and Port places.

  • Yemen is a country starting with Y. Check COUNTRYAAH to find other countries that also begin with letter Y.

Citadel in Zabid

The Yemeni Zabid was founded in 819 and was the center of the Sunni part of Yemen with a famous academy until the 12th century. From the 13th to the 15th centuries, Zabid was the capital of Yemen.

Iskanderija Mosque of Zabid

Zabid in Yemen is a cultural Islamic center with more than 100 mosques, around the Iskanderija Mosque there are numerous Koran schools.

On the Gulf of Aden, the coastal plain is narrower (at most 30 km) and in several places the edge of the mountain range extends to the seashore, so that steep and flat coasts alternate. In addition, there are lava fields with interspersed volcanic cones: the city and port of Aden are located in a double crater.

Aden. The city of Aden has always been an important trading port and strategically important from a military point of view.

Between Schukra and Ahwar, the Harra landscape of As-Sauda extends far into the mountains and near Bir Ali, the ancient port city of Qana is also located on a volcanic cone. In the Tihama plain on the Red Sea, desert steppes dominate, in which salt plant bushes are widespread; it is only interrupted by cultivated areas in the foothills of the mountains that are more well watered and along fewer watercourses coming from the highlands. On the Gulf of Aden, sand and rocky desert alternate. The mountainous country behind it can be divided into two parts: In the west follows with a mighty, divided steep ascent the highlands of Yemen, largely made up of volcanic trapezoid blankets, which in some mountainous areas near the western edge up to 3 760 m above sea level (Jabal an-Nabi Shu’aib) towers. A relatively dense settlement and intensive land use make it the core area of ​​Yemen. The slopes of many mountains are terraced to form cultivated areas up to the summit. In many places the cultivation gets by without irrigation. In the vicinity of the cities, the groundwater enables irrigation, on the edge of the basin the emerging spring water. Further to the east the highlands gradually descend; Due to decreasing rainfall, agricultural use can only be found in the valleys. This also applies to the table land of the Djol (up to 2 185 m above sea level), which adjoins to the east and is mainly made up of tertiary limestone, with semi-deserts and nomadic use, which falls to the north and there into the sandy desert In many places the cultivation gets by without irrigation. In the vicinity of the cities, the groundwater enables irrigation, on the edge of the basin the emerging spring water. Further to the east the highlands gradually descend; Due to decreasing rainfall, agricultural use can only be found in the valleys. This also applies to the table land of the Djol (up to 2 185 m above sea level), which adjoins to the east and is mainly made up of tertiary limestone, with semi-deserts and nomadic use, which falls to the north and there into the sandy desert In many places the cultivation gets by without irrigation. In the vicinity of the cities, the groundwater enables irrigation, on the edge of the basin the emerging spring water. Further to the east the highlands gradually descend; Due to decreasing rainfall, agricultural use can only be found in the valleys. This also applies to the table land of the Djol (up to 2 185 m above sea level), which adjoins to the east and is mainly made up of tertiary limestone, with semi-deserts and nomadic use, which falls to the north and there into the sandy desert Due to decreasing rainfall, agricultural use can only be found in the valleys. This also applies to the table land of the Djol (up to 2 185 m above sea level), which adjoins to the east and is mainly made up of tertiary limestone, with semi-deserts and nomadic use, which falls to the north and there into the sandy desert Due to decreasing rainfall, agricultural use can only be found in the valleys. This also applies to the table land of the Djol (up to 2 185 m above sea level), which adjoins to the east and is mainly made up of tertiary limestone, with semi-deserts and nomadic use, which falls to the north and there into the sandy desertRub al-Khali passes over. In the south it breaks off with striking steep steps towards the sea. Deep, steep-walled wadis (the largest and most important is the Wadi Hadramaut) are cut into the high plateau and offer living space for settled farmers.

Yemen: Wadi Hadramaut

The Wadi Hadramaut in southern Yemen is a fertile valley in an otherwise desert region. It has been an important trading center since ancient times.

To the east of it, almost all nomads live in the Mahra landscape.

Old Arabic art: Marib

The remains of the historic Marib dam in the Yemeni desert, 650 meters long and 20 meters high

Old Arabic art: Marib

preserved pillars of the moon temple near the Sabaean capital Marib in today’s Yemen

Yemen: Wadi Dhar

In the Wadi Dhar near Sanaa (Yemen), the last imam had an impressive summer palace built on a rock in 1789.

Yemen Geography