Ukraine Population and Cities

By | December 24, 2021

The Ukrainian population includes, in addition to the Ukrainians, 2,800.o00 Great Russians, 1,500,000 Jews, 500,000 Poles, 400,000 Germans, 250,000 Moldavians, 100,000 Greeks, as well as White Russians, Bulgarians, Tatars, Persians, Gypsies, Latvians, Lithuanians, etc. . Already called Little Russians in Russia, the Ukrainians were called Ruthenians in the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. They, like the Great Russians, also extended by immigration to the lands of Central Asia (republics of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tadžikistan) and southern Siberia.

Ukrainian villages, very different from villages in northern and central Russia, have houses arranged very irregularly. The prototype of the house is the chata, built in bricks and plastered with a layer of the same clay, which is used to make bricks. The roof, in the southernmost regions, is also covered with clay, while elsewhere it is covered with straw or rushes. The walls are whitewashed with lime. The interior is also painted white, with the stove facing the door and the benches along the walls. The Ukrainian woman’s pride is the cleanliness of the house, which she washes and tidies up continuously. Outside, the houses are surrounded by vegetable gardens and verdant gardens, protected by cherry trees and tall hedges. Overall, Ukrainian villages have a gay feel, even if the roads are now muddy, now dusty. For Ukraine 1997, please check aristmarketing.com.

Most of the population lives in the countryside, so that the urban population represents just over a fifth, and of it only half is made up of Ukrainians. The remainder is made up equally of Great Russians and Jews. The cities of Ukraine stand out from the other cities of Russia mainly due to the abundance of gardens and the large number of tree-lined avenues. Even the surroundings of them are more delightful for the vegetable gardens and orchards, for the small country houses, the so-called da è i, decorated with flowers, for the fields planted with cereals, beets, hemp, tobacco, and for the vineyards. The population density is therefore very high, reaching an average of 64 residents per sq. km., but with a maximum of 82.5 residents per sq. km. in the province of Kiev, of 83 residents in that of Donec, and 81.5 residents in that of Charkov, higher than the density of the Moscow province.

In Ukraine there are also some of the most populous cities of the USSR, namely Charkov with 654,300 residents, Kiev, the capital with 538,600 residents, Odessa with 497,000 residents, Dnepropetrovsk with 379,200 residents, Stalin with 285,000 residents. The population increase from 1926 onwards was 274% for Kharkov, 118% for Kiev and 212% for Dnepropetrovsk. Such population density and the consequent development of some urban centers find their raison d’etre in the happy geographical position of Ukraine, which occupies one of the most fertile parts of the USSR, with a better climate than the other parts. of the USSR, and where there are substantial mineral reserves.

The proximity of the Central-Eastern European states and the ease of communications by sea with the Balkan region of the Straits also affects. Minimum density is the province of Vinnica, where there are just 10 residents. per sq. km. If along the valleys of the rivers the development of settlements is easy, life becomes difficult on the granite shelves and blown by the wind during the winter.

Russia, for obvious reasons, given its belated historical development, does not have many cities, which can boast a great antiquity, but among the few there are some in Ukraine and among them Žitomir, founded by one of Askold’s companions, prince of Kiev at the end of the century. IX, and Kiev itself, which seems to have been founded towards the first half of the century. IX, and which is regarded as the “mother of Russian cities”. These cities maintain, despite the many rearrangements after the ruins and destructions, caused by wars, revolutions and fires, some of the original characteristics, which show how they were military cities with a central core from which radial streets departed., connected to each other by concentric roads. Many other cities arose in the following centuries, during the conquest of the country by the Russian state. Thus under the reign of Anna Ivanovna, Aleksandrovsk, today’s Zaporož′e, was founded in 1740; under the reign of Elizabeth in 1754 Elisavetgrad, today’s Kirov; under the reign of Catherine II, when the conquest of southern Russia was pushed to the bottom, Ekaterinoslav, today’s Dnepropetrovsk (1784), Cherson (1778), Nikolaev (1789), Odessa (1794) arose. These cities have the rectangular or checkerboard type, with the streets cutting at right angles and with a central square. It is the so-called period which in Russian urbanism is distinguished as “modern” which took shape after territorial security was achieved, and the demands of a military nature ceased. today’s Zaporož′e; under the reign of Elizabeth in 1754 Elisavetgrad, today’s Kirov; under the reign of Catherine II, when the conquest of southern Russia was pushed to the bottom, Ekaterinoslav, today’s Dnepropetrovsk (1784), Cherson (1778), Nikolaev (1789), Odessa (1794) arose. These cities have the rectangular or checkerboard type, with the streets cutting at right angles and with a central square. It is the so-called period which in Russian urbanism is distinguished as “modern” which took shape after territorial security was achieved, and the demands of a military nature ceased. today’s Zaporož′e; under the reign of Elizabeth in 1754 Elisavetgrad, today’s Kirov; under the reign of Catherine II, when the conquest of southern Russia was pushed to the bottom, Ekaterinoslav, today’s Dnepropetrovsk (1784), Cherson (1778), Nikolaev (1789), Odessa (1794) arose. These cities have the rectangular or checkerboard type, with the streets cutting at right angles and with a central square. It is the so-called period which in Russian urbanism is distinguished as “modern” which took shape after territorial security was achieved, and the demands of a military nature ceased. Cherson (1778), Nikolaev (1789), Odessa (1794). These cities have the rectangular or checkerboard type, with the streets cutting at right angles and with a central square. It is the so-called period which in Russian urbanism is distinguished as “modern” which took shape after territorial security was achieved, and the demands of a military nature ceased. Cherson (1778), Nikolaev (1789), Odessa (1794). These cities have the rectangular or checkerboard type, with the streets cutting at right angles and with a central square. It is the so-called period which in Russian urbanism is distinguished as “modern” which took shape after territorial security was achieved, and the demands of a military nature ceased.

Other notable centers are Kamenec Podolsk (35,000 residents), Berdicev (53,000 residents), Žitomir (73,000 residents), Vinnica (72,000 residents), Uman (41,000 residents), Černigov (43,000 residents), Sumy (48,500 residents), Kremenčug (70,000 residents), Poltava (100,000 residents), Dneprodzeržinsk (Kamenskoe, 115,000 residents).

In the mining region of Donets the major cities are all industrial and the main ones are Artemovsk (52,000 residents), Slavyansk (47,300 residents), And Stalin, already mentioned. Finally, along the northern coast of the Sea of ​​Azov there are the ports of Berdjansk (36,000 residents) and Mariupol ‘(155,000 residents).

Odessa has bathing establishments for sea and sun bathing, for the treatment of skin diseases and rheumatism near the limans, where there are salty-iodic muds and sulphurous waters. The major buildings of the big cities have a different style, having been built during the century. XVIII and XIX, in imitation of the buildings that adorn the cities of Western Europe. The “twentieth century” had a great diffusion, and in Kharkov the large block of buildings, which enclose the Dzerdžinskij square with fourteen-storey buildings, is worthy of mention. In the secondary streets, however, most of the houses have a very modest appearance. The viability, good and fairly well maintained in the main arteries, is elsewhere in deplorable conditions. Public services, which required a complete reorganization after the revolutionary period, function quite well, particularly for transport. However, major refurbishment works are underway,

Ukraine, rich in fertile lands, with a subsoil in which mineral reserves abound, has a better climate than that of other parts of the USSR, and, as has been said, in more direct contact with the sea and the countries of the Central-Eastern Europe, inhabited by a very large population, furrowed by navigable waterways, devoid of natural obstacles, which prevent the development of communication routes, has all the elements necessary for a rapid and impressive economic development. What actually happened in the past is also true for the present.

Ukraine Cities