Ukraine Language

By | December 24, 2021

Ukrainian (for the relationship with the Ruthenian term, see Ruthenians ; a third term, which has fallen into disuse, is piccolorusso, so called in opposition to granderusso, now used only to indicate the set of dialects on which the Russian literary language rests) is spoken in a territory whose northern and eastern border is a line which, starting from the SE. of Bialystok, crosses the Dnieper at NO. of Černigov and the Don to the North. of Charkov, to then bend, after a wide wedge that creeps almost to the vicinity of Voronež, towards SE., joining Novočerkassk with Stavropol ′, and reaching to the SW. of this city the Black Sea. The coasts of this, as well as of the Sea of ​​Azov (except for the Crimean Peninsula), form the southern border of Ukraine. Its western and southwestern limit is given by an approximate line which, moving from an intermediate point between the mouths of the Dnestr and the Danube, leaves Chiṣinău, Cernăuţi and Uzhhorod in the predominantly Ukrainian territory, overcomes the Carpazî near the Poprád river, it quickly turns east to the San near Przemyśl and from there, after touching Tomaszów and Hrubieszów, it heads almost sharply north until it reaches Białystok. But this territory is not wholly Ukrainian everywhere and especially in its western parts there are strong Polish minorities. On the other hand, Ukrainian does not have the same social function in all regions where it is spoken. Literary and administrative language (but alongside Russian) in the Ukrainian federative republic, it usually has more modest and, in general, rather fluctuating functions outside it. On the other hand, Ukrainian does not have the same social function in all regions where it is spoken. Literary and administrative language (but alongside Russian) in the Ukrainian federative republic, it usually has more modest and, in general, rather fluctuating functions outside it. On the other hand, Ukrainian does not have the same social function in all regions where it is spoken. Literary and administrative language (but alongside Russian) in the Ukrainian federative republic, it usually has more modest and, in general, rather fluctuating functions outside it. For Ukraine religion and languages, please check ezinereligion.com.

A close affinity binds Ukrainian to Great Russian and White Russian, with which it constitutes the group of East Slavic languages ​​(see Russia: Language; Slavs: Languages). However, the Ukrainian speakers, who for political reasons (union of linguistically Ukrainian territories with the Lithuanian Grand Duchy and then, together with this, with the Polish republic; inclusion of the sub-Carpathian Ukrainian zone in Hungary and, after the war, in the Czechoslovakian republic) or they had lost, in the past, or currently only partially have direct contacts with the remaining Russian territory, they have their own characteristics which, always within the Eastern Slavic group, also determine their own individuality.

The main of these characteristics are: 1. a clear distinction between the outcomes of the ancients and and or, according to whether it is a closed syllable or an open syllable (nis “nose”, in the dialects of Polessia nuos, in subcarpatic Russia nus ; lid “ice” poless. ljuod, subcarp. ljud ; against nosa “of the nose”, ledu “of the ice” – of all Ukrainian dialects); 2. the protoslavian ě gives different results from those of the ancient one and, precisely i, except in the Polessia which has ie: misjac ′ “month”, poless. miesec ′; 3. g gives h (as in Czech): hórod “city”, nohá “foot”; 4. a v is prefixed to the initial o: vin “he” (for on). As can also be seen from these few examples, Ukrainian is divided into three main dialects: Ukrainian in the narrow sense of the word that occupies three quarters of the territory, Polessian in the south of the White-Russian and Sub-Carpathian.

Ukraine Language