Ukraine Demography and Economic Geography 2001

By | December 24, 2021

Eastern European state. At the 2001 census the country hosted 48,457,100 residents, 67% of which were urban residents. In 2014 the population decreased further, recording – according to the State statistics service of Ukraine – 45.426.200 residents and an even lower figure (44,941,303 residents) according to an estimate by UNDESA (United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs). Between the nineties and today, the Ukraine was characterized by a reduction in the population (−12% compared to 1990), due in part to the contraction in the birth rate, which however showed a recovery in recent years (from 12.6 ‰ in 1990 to 7.8 ‰ in 2000, to 11.1 ‰ in 2013), to which is added a negative migratory balance. On the contrary, mortality, after having increased at the beginning of the 2000s, has only slightly decreased and is still high (from 12.1 ‰ in 1990, to 15.4 ‰ in 2000 up to 14.6 ‰ in 2013). The health crisis facing the country is evidenced by some surveys. Considering the crude death rate of adults, the World Bank reports that the value of the Ukraine (equal to 15 ‰ in the four-year period 2010-13) is higher than that of its neighbors (Moldova and Belarus) and among the highest in Europe and the world. United Nations Development Program), more than 40% of the adult population aged 18 to 65 (including women of reproductive age) has at least one chronic disease. Among the consequences of such a compromised health situation, there is a decrease in life expectancy at birth, but the data is controversial: while, according to the UNDP, it decreased by 0.8 years from 1980 to 2013 (from 69, 3 to 68.5 years), according to the Ukrainian Statistical Service in 2013 it increased to 71.37 years. From the UNDP the Ukraine however, it is counted among the countries with a high human development index (HDI), having recorded the value of 0.734 in 2013 (an increase of 4% compared to 1980). Furthermore, considerable results have been achieved in the fight against poverty. Again according to the UNDP, if considered in absolute terms (based on the share of the population whose daily consumption is less than 5, 05 $ at purchasing power parity), poverty in the Ukraine decreased from 11.9% in 2000 to 2.3% in 2012; even that considered in relative terms (share of the population below the national poverty line) decreased, in the same time interval, from 26.4% to 25.5%. Nonetheless, poverty levels in rural areas are nearly double those recorded in urban spaces. Finally, significant progress was made in maternal health, infant mortality and education, in line with the objectives set by the poverty levels in rural areas are almost double those recorded in urban spaces. Finally, significant progress was made in maternal health, infant mortality and education, in line with the objectives set by the poverty levels in rural areas are almost double those recorded in urban spaces. Finally, significant progress was made in maternal health, infant mortality and education, in line with the objectives set by the Millennium development goals. For Ukraine 2011, please check internetsailors.com.

Economic conditions. – The economy of the Ukraine it contracted by almost 15% in 2009 (due to the global financial crisis). The World Bank underlines that, in a still complex phase for the Ukraine (due to the uncertain developments of the euro area, the state of the global economy, the country’s political crisis), economic growth has remained weak in the last two years: after the slowdown recorded in 2012, the GDP has nevertheless shown a growth of 3.7%. The World Bank also reports that the unemployment rate – which increased to 9.5% at the beginning of 2009 (due to the aforementioned crisis) – in 2014 increased further, albeit slightly, reaching 10%. A research by Colin C. Williams and John Round (2008) found that only a small minority of households in the country rely on the formal market economy for livelihoods and that the majority instead depend on a plurality of largely informal (market and non-market) economic practices. market). Economic conditions are made even more complex by the energy inefficiency of a country that is heavily dependent on Russian sources and the lack of reforms. In 2015, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced that it had reached an agreement with the Ukrainian government to launch a four-year program of reforms, aimed at the economic stabilization of the country. Economic conditions are made even more complex by the energy inefficiency of a country that is heavily dependent on Russian sources and the lack of reforms. In 2015, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced that it had reached an agreement with the Ukrainian government to launch a four-year program of reforms, aimed at the economic stabilization of the country. Economic conditions are made even more complex by the energy inefficiency of a country that is heavily dependent on Russian sources and the lack of reforms. In 2015, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced that it had reached an agreement with the Ukrainian government to launch a four-year program of reforms, aimed at the economic stabilization of the country.

Ukraine Millennium development goals