Top Universities in Utah

By | April 20, 2019

For those interested in studying in Utah, we have a very useful list. We selected the best Utah institutions for prospective students. Please know that rankings are based on academic research, alumni reviews, graduation rates, as well as assessment from peer colleges. On the page, you will find major admissions stats such as acceptance rate, tuition fees, average SAT scores for each ranked college or university.

  • Visit AllCityCodes for all area codes in the state of Utah.
Rankings Schools
1 Brigham Young University–Provo (Provo, UT)
Tuition: $4,710
Total enrollment: 34,101
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 62.8%
Average freshman retention rate: 85%
6-year graduation rate: 78%
Classes with under 20 students: 46.5%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 26-30
2 University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT)
Tuition: in-state: $7,212, out-of-state: $22,912
Total enrollment: 31,660
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 83.2%
Average freshman retention rate: 85%
6-year graduation rate: 55%
Classes with under 20 students: 41.6%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 21-27
3 Utah State University (Logan, UT)
Tuition: in-state: $5,931, out-of-state: $17,078
Total enrollment: 26,757
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 96.9%
Average freshman retention rate: 72%
6-year graduation rate: 53%
Classes with under 20 students: 31.6%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 20-26

 

Top Universities in Utah

United States presidential election

If the House of Representatives does not come to a decision, then the US Senate chooses from the two candidates who received the most votes.

In virtually the entire history of the United States, the House of Representatives has determined the winner of presidential elections only twice (Thomas Jefferson in 1800 and John Adams in 1824).

The use of such an election system, which is rather unusual for us, is primarily due to historical reasons. When the “Founding Fathers” wrote the US Constitution in 1787, it seemed very reasonable to present the solution to possible problems with the holding of Electoral College elections, and not to the poorly educated masses of the population. In addition, under the existing system of elections, the interests of states with a small population are taken into account to a greater extent, which corresponds to the federal nature of the American state.

All Presidents elected over the past century and a half belonged to one of the two leading parties in the United States – Republican or Democratic. However, nothing prevents independent candidates from participating in elections.

The newly elected President takes office on 20 January of the year following the election year. The solemn ceremony of taking the oath by the new President is called the inauguration. The President takes the oath: “I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully serve as President of the United States, and to the best of my ability I will uphold, guard, and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

In the entire history of the country, forty-six people have been Presidents of the United States, starting from the first President of the United States, George Washington, and up to the current President of the United States, Joe Biden (more onĀ US Presidents).