Top Universities in New York

By | April 20, 2019

For those interested in studying in New York, we have a very useful list. We selected the best New York institutions for prospective students. Please know that rankings are based on academic research, alumni reviews, graduation rates, as well as assessment from peer colleges. On the page, you will find major admissions stats such as acceptance rate, tuition fees, average SAT scores for each ranked college or university.

  • Visit AllCityCodes for all area codes in the state of New York.
Rankings Schools
1 Columbia University (New York, NY)
Tuition: $47,246
Total enrollment: 22,885
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 7.0%
Average freshman retention rate: 99%
6-year graduation rate: 96%
Classes with under 20 students: 80.7%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1390-1560
2 Cornell University (Ithaca, NY)
Tuition: $43,413
Total enrollment: 21,131
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 18.0%
Average freshman retention rate: 97%
6-year graduation rate: 93%
Classes with under 20 students: 57.0%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1300-1500
3 New York University (New York, NY)
Tuition: N/A
Total enrollment: 43,911
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 32.7%
Average freshman retention rate: 92%
6-year graduation rate: 86%
Classes with under 20 students: 63.5%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1260-1460
4 University of Rochester (Rochester, NY)
Tuition: $43,666
Total enrollment: 10,319
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 34.1%
Average freshman retention rate: 95%
6-year graduation rate: 83%
Classes with under 20 students: 69.4%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1230-1440
5 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, NY)
Tuition: $44,475
Total enrollment: 6,914
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 39.6%
Average freshman retention rate: 93%
6-year graduation rate: 84%
Classes with under 20 students: 45.1%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1290-1470
6 Yeshiva University (New York, NY)
Tuition: $36,500
Total enrollment: 6,563
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 69.4%
Average freshman retention rate: 91%
6-year graduation rate: 85%
Classes with under 20 students: 69.9%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1090-1360
7 Fordham University (New York, NY)
Tuition: $41,732
Total enrollment: 15,189
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 42.4%
Average freshman retention rate: 90%
6-year graduation rate: 78%
Classes with under 20 students: 46.9%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1150-1340
8 Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY)
Tuition: $39,004
Total enrollment: 20,829
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 49.4%
Average freshman retention rate: 91%
6-year graduation rate: 80%
Classes with under 20 students: 61.2%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1050-1270
9 State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (Syracuse, NY)
Tuition: in-state: $6,570, out-of-state: $15,820
Total enrollment: 2,346
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 46.8%
Average freshman retention rate: 85%
6-year graduation rate: 66%
Classes with under 20 students: 68.1%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1100-1270
10 State University of New York at Binghamton (Binghamton, NY)
Tuition: in-state: $7,613, out-of-state: $16,761
Total enrollment: 14,746
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 40.7%
Average freshman retention rate: 91%
6-year graduation rate: 78%
Classes with under 20 students: 38.9%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1220-1390
11 State University of New York at Stony Brook (Stony Brook, NY)
Tuition: in-state: $7,514, out-of-state: $18,134
Total enrollment: 24,059
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 39.2%
Average freshman retention rate: 89%
6-year graduation rate: 67%
Classes with under 20 students: 35.8%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1130-1330
12 State University of New York at Buffalo (Buffalo, NY)
Tuition: in-state: $7,482, out-of-state: $15,592
Total enrollment: 28,860
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 53.2%
Average freshman retention rate: 88%
6-year graduation rate: 71%
Classes with under 20 students: 33.1%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1060-1260
13 Clarkson University (Potsdam, NY)
Tuition: $38,610
Total enrollment: 3,539
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 77.5%
Average freshman retention rate: 86%
6-year graduation rate: 75%
Classes with under 20 students: 48.8%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1060-1260
14 New School (New York, NY)
Tuition: $37,846
Total enrollment: 10,797
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 69.3%
Average freshman retention rate: 81%
6-year graduation rate: 61%
Classes with under 20 students: 92.4%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1000-1250
15 State University of New York at Albany (Albany, NY)
Tuition: in-state: $7,525, out-of-state: $18,145
Total enrollment: 17,142
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 51.3%
Average freshman retention rate: 85%
6-year graduation rate: 65%
Classes with under 20 students: 22.7%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1020-1190
16 Hofstra University (Hempstead, NY)
Tuition: $35,450
Total enrollment: 11,404
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 58.8%
Average freshman retention rate: 78%
6-year graduation rate: 58%
Classes with under 20 students: 50.7%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1080-1250
17 Polytechnic Institute of New York University (Brooklyn, NY)
Tuition: $39,566
Total enrollment: 4,487
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 68.2%
Average freshman retention rate: 85%
6-year graduation rate: 54%
Classes with under 20 students: 49.8%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1213-1390
18 St. John’s University (Queens, NY)
Tuition: $35,520
Total enrollment: 21,067
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 49.1%
Average freshman retention rate: 78%
6-year graduation rate: 58%
Classes with under 20 students: 37.0%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 970-1190
19 St. John Fisher College (Rochester, NY)
Tuition: $27,370
Total enrollment: 3,977
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 66.5%
Average freshman retention rate: 83%
6-year graduation rate: 73%
Classes with under 20 students: 40.7%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 990-1190
20 Adelphi University (Garden City, NY)
Tuition: $29,320
Total enrollment: 7,922
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 69.2%
Average freshman retention rate: 80%
6-year graduation rate: 66%
Classes with under 20 students: 48.6%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 980-1180
21 Pace University (New York, NY)
Tuition: $36,504
Total enrollment: 12,593
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 73.8%
Average freshman retention rate: 77%
6-year graduation rate: 56%
Classes with under 20 students: 46.3%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 1000-1190

 

Top Universities in New York

Chrysler Building

Chrysler Building (Chrysler Building) – one of the most famous and recognizable skyscrapers in New York, located in Midtown Manhattan at the intersection of East 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue, next to Grand Central Station. Both the appearance of this seventy-seven-story building and the history of its construction are very unusual.

In the late twenties and early thirties of the last century, skyscrapers were built one after another in New York, and for the owners of each of them it was a matter of prestige to surpass the height of its predecessor. Architect William van Alen designed the 246-meter building for contractor William Reynolds, but the rights to the building were later bought out by Walter Chrysler, who planned to house the headquarters of his automobile corporation in the new building. At the request of Chrysler, the project was revised, the planned height of the building increased by ten floors (up to 282 meters). Construction of the Chrysler Building began on September 19, 1928.

At the same time, another skyscraper was being completed in New York – a seventy-story building at 40 Wall Street (later known as the “Trump Building”). Its architect was Craig Severance, a former colleague and then rival of van Alen. Knowing the expected height of the Chrysler Building, Severance increased the height of his building to 283 meters in pursuit of fame.

William van Alen’s response was to obtain permission to increase the height of the Chrysler Building. Without too much publicity, he assembled a steel spire about 38 meters high inside a skyscraper under construction. After the spire was erected on top of the building, the Chrysler Building reached a height of 320 meters, becoming the tallest building in the world (although eleven months later, on May 1, 1931, it was “overtaken” by the Empire State Building).

On May 27, 1930, the Chrysler Building was opened to the public. Despite the very fast pace of construction (four floors a week) and very primitive security measures, not a single person died during the construction of the building.

The Chrysler Building is a classic example of Art Deco architecture. Stainless steel was widely used in the decoration of the brick-built building, including for the arched “crown” and spire crowning the building. The lobbies, elevators and other interior spaces of the skyscraper are no less luxuriously decorated.

Already after Walter Chrysler acquired the project for the building, “automobile” motives were introduced into it. So, for example, on the corners of the thirty-first floor of the Chrysler Building, there are metal sculptures of “eagle wings”, stylized as figurines that adorned the hoods of Chrysler cars of the 1929 model. Even higher, on the sixty-first floor, the famous “eagle heads” (or “gargoyles”) of the Chrysler Building look at the Big Apple.

The metal “crown” of the building, which reflects sunlight during the day, is illuminated by numerous spotlights at night.

According to many experts (and just residents of the city), the Chrysler Building is the most beautiful of the many skyscrapers in Manhattan. The building is traditionally included in the top ten “most beloved” architectural structures in the United States of America.

Immediately after the completion of the construction of the building, an observation deck accessible to visitors was located on the seventy-first floor, but already in 1945 it was closed. Until the end of the seventies of the last century, three floors of the Chrysler Building (from the sixty-sixth to the sixty-eighth) were occupied by a private “Cloud Club”. For some time, television and radio transmitters were installed on the upper (technical) floors of the building, but over time, almost all of them “moved” to the Empire State Building.

The Chrysler Building was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Until the fifties of the XX century, the building remained the property of the Chrysler family, later it changed many owners. Now the offices of many companies are located here, and therefore free access is open only to the lobbies of the first floor. Nevertheless, the Chrysler Building is one of the most famous sights and symbols of New York and constantly attracts the attention of numerous tourists.