Top Universities in Arizona

By | April 20, 2019

For those interested in studying in Arizona, we have a very useful list. We selected the best Arizona institutions for prospective students. Please know that rankings are based on academic research, alumni reviews, graduation rates, as well as assessment from peer colleges. On the page, you will find major admissions stats such as acceptance rate, tuition fees, average SAT scores for each ranked college or university.

  • Visit AllCityCodes for all area codes in the state of Arizona.
Rankings Schools
1 University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Tuition: in-state: $10,035, out-of-state: $26,231
Total enrollment: 39,236
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 71.4%
Average freshman retention rate: 78%
6-year graduation rate: 61%
Classes with under 20 students: 34.8%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 970-1220
2 Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ)
Tuition: in-state: $9,724, out-of-state: $22,977
Total enrollment: 72,254
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 88.9%
Average freshman retention rate: 82%
6-year graduation rate: 57%
Classes with under 20 students: 39.4%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 970-1240
3 Northern Arizona University (Flagstaff, AZ)
Tuition: N/A
Total enrollment: 25,364
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: 64.8%
Average freshman retention rate: 71%
6-year graduation rate: 52%
Classes with under 20 students: 31.6%
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: 950-1180
4 Northcentral University (Prescott Valley, AZ)
Tuition: N/A
Total enrollment: N/A
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: N/A
Average freshman retention rate: 100%
6-year graduation rate: N/A
Classes with under 20 students: N/A
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: N/A
5 University of Phoenix (Phoenix, AZ)
Tuition: N/A
Total enrollment: N/A
Fall 2011 acceptance rate: N/A
Average freshman retention rate: N/A
6-year graduation rate: 5%
Classes with under 20 students: N/A
SAT/ACT 25th-75th percentile: N/A

 

Top Universities in Arizona

Arizona since Second World War

Like the rest of the United States of America, Arizona experienced the years of the Great Depression very hard. At the same time, it was in the twenties and thirties of the 20th century that the tourism industry began to develop in Arizona with its hot climate, picturesque landscapes and unique natural sites.

During the Second World War, which brought another rise to the economy of Arizona, camps for prisoners of war were located on the territory of the state, as well as for interned US citizens – ethnic Japanese.

In 1948, Indians in Arizona gained the right to vote. In the same year, the first high-tech production was opened in the state, which was previously only “mining” and “agricultural”, – Motorola, one of the largest manufacturers of radio devices at that time, built its factory here.

In the decades after the war, Arizona’s population grew rapidly (and continues to grow today). Not the last role in this was played by the spread of air conditioners, which made life more comfortable in the hot climate of Arizona.

In 1968, the thirty-sixth President of the United States, Lyndon Johnson, signed into law the construction of a canal in Arizona, known as the “Central Arizona Canal.” The purpose of the new project was to divert water from the Colorado River to irrigate central and southern Arizona.

Construction began in 1973 and was completed in 1994. The 541 km long Central Arizona Canal is the largest and most expensive canal system ever built in the United States.