Top Physics Schools in Texas

By | April 29, 2018

On TopSchoolsintheUSA.com, you can learn what the top-ranked physics colleges and universities are in Texas, and compare the best physics colleges, and get the latest ranking of best schools for physics in Texas. From the following table, please see full list of top 11 graduate schools of physics in Texas including school information and contact profile.

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Top Physics Schools in Texas

RANKING GRADUATE PHYSICS
1 University of Texas–Austin, Department of Physics
Address: 1 University Station C1600, Austin, TX 78712-0264
Phone: (512) 471-1153
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ph.utexas.edu
2 Rice University, Physics and Astronomy Department
Address: 6100 Main MS-61, Houston, TX 77005-1827
Phone: (713) 348-4938
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://physics.rice.edu
3 Texas A&M University–College Station, Department of Physics and Astronomy
Address: 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-4242
Phone: (979) 845-7717
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://physics.tamu.edu
4 University of Texas–Dallas, Physics Department
Address: 800 W. Campbell Road , Richardson , TX 75080
Phone: (972) 883-2884
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.utdallas.edu
5 University of Houston, Department of Physics
Address: 617 Science & Research Building 1, Houston, TX 77204-5505
Phone: (713) 743-3523
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://phys.uh.edu
6 Baylor University, Department of Physics
Address: 1 Bear Place, Waco, TX 76798-7316
Phone: (254) 710-2510
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.baylor.edu
7 University of Texas–Arlington, Department of Physics
Address: Box 19059, Arlington, TX 76019
Phone: (817) 272-2266
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.uta.edu
8 Southern Methodist University, Department of Physics
Address: 3215 Daniel Avenue, Dallas, TX 75275-0175
Phone: (214) 768-2495
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.physics.smu.edu
9 Texas Tech University, Physics Department
Address: Campus Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051
Phone: (806) 742-3767
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.phys.ttu.edu
10 University of North Texas, Department of Physics
Address: 1155 Union Circle, Denton, TX 76203
Phone: (940) 565-2626
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.phys.unt.edu
11 Texas Christian University, Department of Physics and Astronomy
Address: TCU Box 298840, Fort Worth, TX 76129
Phone: (817) 257-7375
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.phys.tcu.edu

Recent History of the State of Texas

In the late forties and early fifties of the XIX century, the population of Texas grew rapidly, also due to numerous immigrants from Europe. At the same time, the development of new lands was complicated by constant conflicts between settlers and Indians. The territories in the west of modern Texas and Oklahoma, southwest Kansas, southeast Colorado and east New Mexico from the middle of the 18th century to the middle of the 19th century were controlled by warlike tribes of the Comanche people and were called “Comancheria”. Constant attacks on European settlements, murders, robberies and arson made the Comanche the sworn enemies of the Texans. Before joining the United States, Texas did not have the strength to solve the “Indian question”, but in the fifties, the Comanches were repeatedly attacked by the Texas Rangers and the army of the United States of America. The first successful offensive against the Comancheria was in 1858 the “Antelope Hills Expedition”, during which the Rangers, under the leadership of Captain John Ford and with the support of the Indian allies, deeply invaded the Comanche lands and defeated them in several battles. The final expulsion of the Indians from Texas was delayed by the civil war that began in the United States and ended only in the seventies of the century before last.

The backbone of the Texas economy in the mid-19th century was King Cotton, which was grown by black slaves. Texas originally became part of the United States as a slave state and in 1860 slaves made up about 30% of its population. On February 1, 1861, Texas announced its secession from the United States, and on March 2, the “Lone Star State” became one of the seven founders of the Confederate States of America. Sam Houston, then governor of Texas, refused to take the oath of allegiance to the Confederacy and was removed from his post.

Relatively few battles took place in Texas during the Civil War, most of them on the coast. The state was called the “back door of the Confederacy” because it was only through Texas that the southerners could sell cotton to Europe after the northerners set up a blockade of the east coast ports. The US Navy also blockaded Galveston, which in those years was the main port of Texas. Galveston, as well as Brownsville, located on the border with Mexico, was captured more than once by the northerners, then by the Confederates during the war.

Texas also played a very important role in supplying the Confederate military, with Texian regiments in virtually every major battle. On May 12, 1865, after the surrender of the army of the southerners, the last battle of the Civil War took place in Texas – the Battle of Palmito Ranch. The Lone Star State was the only one of the rebellious states of the US South that was not captured by the northerners during the war.

On June 19, 1865, in Galveston, U.S. Army General Gordon Granger read the Emancipation Proclamation. Since then, this day has become a holiday, at first unofficial, and since 1980 approved by state legislators. “Liberation Day”, as they called June 19 in Texas, is celebrated in our time in most American states. Another Texas Civil War-related official holiday is Confederate Heroes Day, which is celebrated on January 19th.

In the early years after the end of the war, many gangs operated in Texas, most of which were based in Indian territories. Order was gradually restored in the state, and on March 30, 1870, the US Congress again accepted Texas into the United States of America. The Texas Constitution was adopted in 1876 and is still in effect today.

The emancipation of the slaves caused a crisis and major changes in the structure of the Texas economy. Cotton cultivation was no longer the most important industry, giving way to cattle breeding. In the last decades of the 19th century, Texas ranches supplied the ever-growing demand for meat in the Northeast and Midwest of the United States. Huge herds were driven north by cowboy shepherds to the Kansas railroad yards, where the cattle were loaded onto wagons and transported to the slaughterhouses of Chicago. In the early eighties, the first railroads came to Texas, giving another impetus to the development of the state. The Texas cattle boom created the still popular image of the “Texas cowboy” in the “ten gallon” hat, which is an integral part of the “Wild West” in modern culture.

In 1901, the first major oil field was explored in Texas. This discovery began the period of the “oil boom” in the “Lone Star State”, geologists found one richest field after another, oil rigs grew like a forest, and by 1940 Texas came out on top in the United States in terms of production of “black gold”.

The state’s economy was hit hard by the Great Depression, drought, and devastating dust storms in the 1930s. Tens of thousands of Texas residents were then forced to leave their cities and farms, many of them went west to California along the famous Route 66.

During the Second World War, dozens of military training units and airfields were located in Texas, including the largest naval aviation center in Corpus Christi. In addition, more than twenty POW camps were established in the state, which held about fifty thousand Germans, Italians and Japanese (more than in any other US state).

In the post-war years, oil production and refining continued to be the backbone of the Texas economy, but other industries, including high-tech industries, also successfully developed in the state. For example, Texas became one of the centers of the space program of the United States of America, in 1961 the NASA-owned Center for Manned Flight was established in Houston, later renamed the Lyndon Johnson Space Center.

On November 22, 1963, the thirty-fifth President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, was assassinated in Dallas. This tragedy shocked America, and the circumstances of the Kennedy assassination are still the subjects of numerous disputes and theories.

In the nineties of the XX century, Texas overtook the state of New York by the number of residents, becoming the second (after California) US state in terms of population.