Top Physics Schools in Massachusetts

By | April 29, 2018

On TopSchoolsintheUSA.com, you can learn what the top-ranked physics colleges and universities are in Massachusetts, and compare the best physics colleges, and get the latest ranking of best schools for physics in Massachusetts. From the following table, please see full list of top 11 graduate schools of physics in Massachusetts including school information and contact profile.

  • Check bridgat for a full list of community and technical colleges in Massachusetts.

Top Physics Schools in Massachusetts

RANKING GRADUATE PHYSICS
1 Harvard University, Department of Physics
Address: 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: (617) 495-2872
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.physics.harvard.edu
2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics
Address: 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
Phone: (617) 253-4841
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://web.mit.edu
3 Boston University, Department of Physics
Address: 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215
Phone: (617) 353-2600
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://physics.bu.edu
4 University of Massachusetts–Amherst, Department of Physics
Address: 1126 Lederle Graduate Research Tower, Worcester, MA 01003-9337
Phone: (413) 545-2545
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.physics.umass.edu
5 Brandeis University, The Martin A. Fisher School of Physics
Address: 415 South Street, Waltham, MA 02254-9110
Phone: (781) 736-2800
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.physics.brandeis.edu
6 Northeastern University, Department of Physics
Address: 110 Forsyth Street, Boston, MA 02115
Phone: (617) 373-2902
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.physics.neu.edu
7 Boston College, Department of Physics
Address: 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3804
Phone: (617) 552-3537
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.physics.bc.edu
8 Tufts University, Department of Physics and Astronomy
Address: Robinson Hall , Medford, MA 02155
Phone: (617) 627-3029
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://wikis.uit.tufts.edu
9 Clark University, Department of Physics
Address: 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610-1477
Phone: (508) 793-7169
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.clarku.edu
10 University of Massachusetts–Lowell, Department of Physics and Applied Physics
Address: Olney Science Center, Lowell, MA 01854
Phone: (978) 934-3767
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.uml.edu
11 Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics
Address: 100 Institute Road, Worcester, MA 01609-2280
Phone: (508) 831-5258
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.wpi.edu

History of Boston

Founded by Puritan settlers from England in 1630, Boston became the economic and cultural center of New England. It was here, from the Boston Tea Party and the patriotic movement, that the American Revolution was born. Such major episodes of the American War of Independence as the Battle of Bunker Hill and the Siege of Boston took place here. Later, at the beginning of the 19th century, Boston became the most important transport hub in the region and played a large role in the development of the railroad system in the country. In the middle of the century before last, a powerful anti-slavery movement developed in the city, which was one of the reasons for the civil war that shook the country. Over the following decades, the city from the WASP citadel(white Protestants of Anglo-Saxon origin) gradually came under the control of the political elites of the Irish Catholics. All these and many other ups and downs of its development make the history of Boston extremely rich, interesting and important for the United States of America.

During archaeological excavations on the territory of modern Boston, evidence was found that ancient people lived on these lands at least seven and a half thousand years ago.

Europeans arrived here at the beginning of the 17th century, when the Plymouth Colony and, a little later, the Massachusetts Bay Colony were founded on the territory of the modern state of Massachusetts . The first white settler in the area of ​​the future Boston was William Blackstone, a priest, a member of one of the first Puritan expeditions to the area of ​​the future New England, who settled here alone in the mid-twenties (it is believed that the famous Boston park Boston Common is now located on his land). In the summer of 1630, conveniently located on the shore of the bay and near the source of fresh water, the land was chosen by the colonists to found a new settlement. Situated on three hills, the new village was immediately named Trimountaine, but already on September 7, 1630, the creation of the city of Boston (named after the English town, from which several settlers were from) was announced.

The first residents of Boston were deeply religious people, and among other things they considered education very important for society, naturally, in the first place, the study of theology. It is not surprising that just a few years after the founding of the city, in 1635, the first educational institution, the Boston Latin School, was opened in it. This school still operates today, being the oldest existing school in the United States. A year later, in 1636, Harvard University, the oldest in the United States and one of the most prestigious in the world, was founded in the Boston suburb of Cambridge.

The favorable geographical position and convenient harbor of Boston led to the rapid growth and development of the new city. Boston became the busiest port in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and was later called the “Capital of New England”.

Shortly after American settlers learned of the Glorious Revolution in the distant metropolis, an uprising began in Boston against the royal governor. The Dominion of New England, which then included Boston and Massachusetts, was led by Edmund Andros from 1686. He was extremely unpopular due to the infringement of the rights of local residents and the planting of the Anglican Church in the originally Puritan colonies. On April 18, 1689, a group of determined citizens with weapons in their hands arrested Andros and some other government officials, as well as officers and ministers of the Anglican Church. The uprising passed without bloodshed, and its result was the return to Massachusetts (and other English colonies in America) of somewhat greater autonomy in government.