Top Nursing Schools in New York

By | March 19, 2019

If you intend to purse a nursing degree in New York, you should aim at the top nursing schools in New York. Let’s show below, which schools have a standard curriculum for nursing education and are recognized by the market.

See the latest nursing school ranking of the state and check the top nursing colleges among the institutions and the best evaluated courses in New York.

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Top Nursing Schools in New York

List of Best Nursing Colleges in New York

Rankings Nursing Universities Nursing Colleges
1 Columbia University
Mailing Address: 630 West 168th Street, Mailbox 6, New York, NY 10032
E-mail: nursing@columbia.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/dept/nursing/
School of Nursing
2 New York University
Mailing Address: 246 Greene Street, New York, NY 10003
Phone Number: (212) 998-5317
Website Homepage: http://www.nyu.edu/nursing/academicprograms/doctoral/index.html
College of Nursing
3 University of Rochester
Mailing Address: 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642
Phone Number: (585) 275-2375
E-mail: son_info@urmc.rochester.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.son.rochester.edu/
School of Nursing
4 Pace University
Mailing Address: 1 Pace Plaza, New York, NY 10038
Phone Number: (914) 773-3552
E-mail: nursing@pace.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.pace.edu/lienhard/
Lienhard School of Nursing
5 CUNY Hunter College
Mailing Address: 425 E. 25 Street, New York, NY 10010
Phone Number: (212) 481-4465
E-mail: cbrown@hunter.cuny.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/shp/nursing/programs_grad.shtml
Hunter Bellevue School of Nursing
6 University at Buffalo SUNY
Mailing Address: 1040 Kimball Tower, Buffalo, NY 14214-3079
Phone Number: (716) 829-2537
E-mail: nurse-studentaffairs@buffalo.edu
Website Homepage: http://nursing.buffalo.edu
School of Nursing
7 SUNY Stony Brook
Mailing Address: Health Science Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8240
Phone Number: (631) 444-3200
E-mail: Irene.Stern@Stonybrook.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.nursing.stonybrook.edu/
Stony Brook University School of Nursing
8 Binghamton University SUNY
Mailing Address: PO Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000
Phone Number: (607) 777-4964
E-mail: jferrari@binghamton.edu
Website Homepage: http://dson.binghamton.edu/
Decker School of Nursing
9 SUNY Upstate Medical Center
Mailing Address: 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210-2375
Phone Number: (315) 464-4276
E-mail: gavanc@upstate.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.upstate.edu/con/
College of Nursing
10 Adelphi University
Mailing Address: 1 South Avenue, Garden City, NY 11530-0701
Phone Number: (516) 877-4540
Website Homepage: http://nursing.adelphi.edu/
School of Nursing
11 CUNY Lehman College
Mailing Address: 250 Bedford Park Boulevard, West Bronx, NY 10468-1589
Phone Number: (718) 960-8214
E-mail: nursing.department@lehman.cuny.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.lehman.cuny.edu/deannss/nursing/
Department of Nursing
12 SUNY Downstate Medical Center
Mailing Address: 450 Clarkson Avenue, Box 22, Brooklyn, NY 11203-2098
Phone Number: (718)270-7600
Website Homepage: http://www.hscbklyn.edu/nursing/default.html
College of Nursing
13 The Sage Colleges
Mailing Address: 45 Ferry Street, Troy, NY 12180
Phone Number: (518) 244-2384
E-mail: nursing@sage.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.sage.edu/rsc/academics/programs/nursing/
Division of Nursing
14 SUNY Institute of Technology Utica/Rome
Mailing Address: PO Box 3050, Utica, NY 13504
Phone Number: (315) 792-7500
Website Homepage: http://www.sunyit.edu/nursing
School of Nursing and Health Systems
15 St. John Fisher College
Mailing Address: 3690 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618
Phone Number: (585) 385-8000
E-mail: mccloskey@sjfc.edu
Website Homepage: http://home.sjfc.edu/nursing/programs.asp
Nursing Programs
16 CUNY Staten Island
Mailing Address: 2800 Victory Boulevard, Bldg.55, Rm. 213, Staten Island, NY 10314
E-mail: lunney@mail.csi.cuny.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.csi.cuny.edu/nursing/
Department of Nursing
17 College of Mount St Vincent
Mailing Address: 6301 Riverdale Avenue, Riverdale, NY 10471
Phone Number: (718) 405-3267
E-mail: harriet.rothman@mountsaintvincent.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.mountsaintvincent.edu/408.htm
Department of Nursing
18 College of New Rochelle
Mailing Address: 29 Castle Place, New Rochelle, NY 10805-2308
Phone Number: (914) 654-5801
E-mail: dlattimer@cnr.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.cnr.edu/NursingSchool/SchoolofNursing
School of Nursing
19 Molloy College
Mailing Address: 1000 Hempstead Avenue, Rockville, NY 11571-5002
Phone Number: (516) 678-5000
Website Homepage: http://www.molloy.edu/academicG/nur/index.asp
Department of Nursing
20 Mount St. Mary College
Mailing Address: 330 Powell Avenue, Newburgh, NY 12550
Phone Number: (845) 569-3512
Website Homepage: http://www.msmc.la.edu/undergraduate-bachelor-programs/nursing.asp
Division of Nursing
21 SUNY New Paltz
Mailing Address: Van den Berg Hall 201, New Paltz, NY 12561-2499
Phone Number: (845) 257-2922
Website Homepage: http://www.newpaltz.edu/nursing/programs_grad.html
Department of Nursing
22 Wagner College
Mailing Address: 1 Campus Road, Staten Island, NY 10301
Phone Number: (718) 390-3444
E-mail: kahern@wagner.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.wagner.edu/graduate_programs/nursing
Department of Nursing
23 D’Youville College
Mailing Address: 320 Porter Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201-9985
Phone Number: (716) 829-7613
E-mail: kiefferv@dyc.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.dyc.edu/academics/nursing/index.asp
Nursing Department
24 Long Island University Brooklyn
Mailing Address: 1 University Plaza, Brooklyn, NY 11201-8423
Phone Number: (718) 488-1011
E-mail: attend@liu.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.liunet.edu/Brooklyn/Academics/Schools/SON.aspx
School of Nursing
25 Long Island University C.W. Post Campus
Mailing Address: 720 Northern Boulevard, Brookville, NY 11548
Phone Number: (516) 299-2320
E-mail: nursing@cwpost.liu.edu
Website Homepage: http://www2.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/health/nursing/
Department of Nursing
26 Mercy College
Mailing Address: 555 Broadway , Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522
Phone Number: (914) 674-7863
E-mail: mmcguinness@mercy.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.mercycollege.edu/future-students/nursing/
Division of Health Professions
27 Daemen College
Mailing Address: 4380 Main Street, Amherst, NY 14226-3592
Phone Number: (800) 462-7652
E-mail: admissions@daemen.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.daemen.edu/academics/divisionofhealthhumanservices/Nursing/Pages/default.aspx
Nursing Department
28 Dominican College
Mailing Address: 470 Western Highway, Orangeburg, NY 10962
Phone Number: (845) 848-6026
E-mail: admissions@dc.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.dc.edu/academics.aspx?id=338
Division of Nursing
29 Nazareth College of Rochester
Mailing Address: 4245 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618-3790
Phone Number: (585) 389-2709
E-mail: hlovett8@naz.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.naz.edu/dept/nursing/grad/index.html
Nursing Department
30 Excelsior College
Mailing Address: 7 Columbia Circle, Albany, NY 12203-5159
Phone Number: (888) 647-2388
E-mail: admissions@excelsior.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.excelsior.edu/school-of-nursing
School of Nursing

Best Colleges for Nursing in New York

Empire State Building

The Empire State Building is one of the tallest skyscrapers in New York and one of the most famous architectural structures in the United States.

The Empire State Building is located in Midtown Manhattan on the west side of Fifth Avenue between West 33rd and 34th streets. The building has one hundred and two floors, its height is three hundred and eighty one meters, and with antennas mounted on a spire – four hundred and forty three meters. For thirty-nine years, the Empire State Building was the tallest building in the world until the World Trade Center was built in New York in 1970. After the tragic events of September 11, 2001, when the twin towers of the WTC were destroyed as a result of a terrorist attack, the Empire State Building again became the tallest building in the city for eleven years.

The dimensions of the building are one hundred twenty-nine meters along West Streets and fifty-seven meters along Fifth Avenue. The total area of ​​the premises is almost two hundred and nine thousand m 2, of which more than two hundred thousand m 2 are leased. The Empire State Building has six thousand five hundred and fourteen windows. Visitors and employees of the building are transported by seventy-three elevators, and in order to climb the stairs to the top floor, one must overcome one thousand eight hundred and sixty steps.

The building got its famous name from the nickname of the state of New York – “Imperial State” (“Empire State Building” – “Imperial State Building”).

The Empire State Building is so large that it has been given its own zip code by the US Post Office.

At the beginning of the 20th century, a kind of competition flared up in New York – who will build the tallest skyscraper? From 1913 to 1930, the fifty-seven-story Woolworth Building held the palm. Then for just two months, from April to May 1930, the seventy-story building at 40 Wall Street (later known as the “Trump Building”) was the leader. On May 27, 1930, the seventy-seven-story skyscraper Chrysler Building was completed. The builders of the Empire State Building were faced with the task of building a new “champion”.

The skyscraper was designed by architect William Lamb. He already had experience building tall office buildings, having designed the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and the Carew Tower in Cincinnati, Ohio. It is these two buildings that are now considered the architectural “predecessors” of the Empire State Building. Interestingly, in 1979, during the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Reynolds Building, the general manager of the New York skyscraper even sent a postcard to Winston-Salem with the text “Happy anniversary, father!”

The architects and builders were tasked not only to build the tallest building in New York (and in the world), but also to do it in the shortest possible time: from the first sketches to the completion of construction, they had only a year and a half. At the same time, it was also necessary to meet a fixed budget. During the design process, the planned design and height of the building changed more than once, in order to be guaranteed to surpass competitors, it was decided to build a spire on top of the future skyscraper, to which it was planned to moor airships popular at that time.

The construction of the Empire State Building was financed by a group of investors, among whom were large entrepreneurs and financiers, including the heads of the largest American companies DuPont (chemical industry) and General Motors (automobile production) John Raskob, Pierre Dupont and Louis Kaufman.

On the site where the Empire State Building now stands, the old building of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel was previously located, it began to be demolished on October 1, 1929. Already in January 1930, the construction of the skyscraper began earthworks, and contractors received an order for the manufacture of elements of metal structures. The actual construction of the building began on one of the unofficial US holidays – St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, 1930. On April 1, the first parts of the steel frame were installed.

Building materials came from various states and countries: limestone from Indiana quarries; steel beams from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; cement and concrete from New York State; marble from Italy, France and England; wood from the forests of Oregon and Washington; a variety of equipment from New England. To transport materials to the construction site, a temporary road was laid between 33rd and 34th streets, along which two hundred trucks daily delivered up to five thousand bags of cement, sixteen thousand partition slabs, three hundred and forty m 2sand, three hundred bags of lime, elements of metal structures and much more. From the warehouse arranged in the basement, the materials were delivered by trolleys to the elevators, then they went up and in the same trolleys along temporary rail tracks were fed to the place of installation.

More than three and a half thousand people worked on the construction site of the Empire State Building (the maximum simultaneous number of workers on the construction site was 3439 on August 14, 1930), most of them were immigrants from Europe (mostly Irish and Italians) who had recently arrived in the United States. Among the other builders of the skyscraper, the Mohawk Indians from Quebec in Canada, who were considered the best high-rise erectors, stood out. In order for the workers not to have to go down once again, temporary cafes and trade tents worked on several, still unfinished floors during the construction, and a temporary water supply was also stretched upstairs.

In the first ten days of construction, the building rose fourteen stories. By June 20, the supporting steel structure of the skyscraper had risen to the twenty-sixth floor, and by July 27, it had already grown to half its entire height. On September 10, a solemn ceremony of laying the “cornerstone” was held, which was attended by thousands of spectators. The skyscraper’s steel frame construction was completed on September 19, twelve days ahead of schedule and twenty-three weeks after work began. On 21 November, the mooring mast for the airships was completed. On April 11, 1931, the construction of the Empire State Building was completed.

The new skyscraper is the tallest building in the world and the first to exceed 100 stories. The opening ceremony of the Empire State Building took place on May 1, 1931, and was attended by New York City Mayor Jimmy Walker and New York State Governor Franklin Roosevelt. In addition, US President Herbert Hoover, while in Washington, D.C., turned on the lights in a New York skyscraper at the push of a button.

Like many other architectural structures of that era, the building was built in the Art Deco style. Along with the limestone walls, the Empire State Building featured marble, stainless steel, bronze and glass.

Initially, the architects intended to use the skyscraper as a mooring mast for airships. At its top was built a hollow steel mast 48 meters high, equipped with elevators and designed to service huge aircraft. On the eighty-sixth floor there were ticket offices and check-in counters, and on the one hundred and first floor there was a small waiting room. The one hundred and second floor was surrounded by a balcony, from which it was planned to board passengers directly. In fact, powerful updrafts, high winds, and the spiers of Manhattan’s numerous skyscrapers created serious problems for airship flights. In addition, it also proved impossible to release ballast (which was necessary to control the clumsy flying giants) over densely populated areas. As a result, only once in September 1931, an attempt was made to moor an airship to the spire of the Empire State Building, after which plans to continue using the building as an “airport” were abandoned. Moreover, after In the aftermath of the Hinderburg disaster, the popularity of airships plummeted and later (in the fifties of the last century) the spire of the building was rebuilt, turning, in fact, into a television and radio tower.

In the early thirties, when the Empire State Building was built, the United States of America was going through a period of the Great Depression, which naturally affected the profitability of the new skyscraper. It was originally planned for office rentals, but a year after its grand opening, less than a quarter of its premises were occupied. The building was then even called the ” Empty State Building “, that is, the “Empty State Building”. To some extent, the situation was improved by income from tourists attracted by the advertisement of the “tallest building in the world” and wishing to look at New York from one of the observation platforms, as well as from fees for placing antennas.

As early as December 22, 1931, just six months after the completion of the construction of the skyscraper, the first experimental transmission of a television signal was carried out from an antenna installed on the spire of the building. Gradually, almost all television and radio stations in New York installed their transmitters on the tallest building in the city. Now, although many of the antennas have been relocated to the city’s newer, taller buildings, the Empire State Building still uses a number of television and radio stations as a base for its antennas.

The Empire State Building has three viewing platforms – on the eightieth, eighty-sixth and one hundred-second floors. The sites of the eightieth and one hundred and second floors are closed, and on the eighty-sixth, visitors can go to an open circular gallery. The skyscraper’s observation decks are so popular that the sale of tickets to them brings income to building owners comparable to income from office space rental (and in some years even more).

The searchlights on top of the Empire State Building were installed immediately after its completion, in 1956 they were replaced with other, more powerful ones. In 1964, new lamps were installed on the seventy-second floor to illuminate the top of the building. Later, they changed more than once, but the illumination of the skyscraper has become a tradition. The coloring of the Empire State Building is usually timed to coincide with various holidays and memorable dates. So, for example, on Independence Day, the building is lit with red-blue-white spotlights (the colors of the national flag), on Thanksgiving Day – red-orange-yellow, on Valentine’s Day – red-pink-white, on St. Patrick’s Day – green.

The Empire State Building is one of the most famous and recognizable symbols of Manhattan and New York. This skyscraper occupies an honorable first place in the list of the most popular architectural monuments in the United States and was included in the list of the seven wonders of the modern world compiled by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

In 1986, the Empire State Building was officially designated a National Historic Landmark in the United States.