Top Nursing Schools in Missouri

By | March 19, 2019

If you intend to purse a nursing degree in Missouri, you should aim at the top nursing schools in Missouri. Let’s show below, which schools have a standard curriculum for nursing education and are recognized by the market.

See the latest nursing school ranking of the state and check the top nursing colleges among the institutions and the best evaluated courses in Missouri.

  • TRAVELATIONARY: Detailed geography information including climate and bordering states of Missouri. Also includes GDP, unemployment rate, economic sectors, and other economy data about Missouri.

Top Nursing Schools in Missouri

List of Best Nursing Colleges in Missouri

Rankings Nursing Universities Nursing Colleges
1 University of Missouri
Phone Number: (573) 882-0277
E-mail: nursing@muhealth.org
Website Homepage: http://nursing.missouri.edu/
Sinclair School of Nursing
2 St. Louis University
Mailing Address: 3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO 63104-1099
Phone Number: (314) 977-8995
E-mail: slunurse@slu.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.slu.edu/nursing.xml
School of Nursing
3 University of Missouri Kansas City
Mailing Address: 2220 Holmes, Kansas City, MO 64108
E-mail: nurses@umkc.edu
Website Homepage: http://nursing.umkc.edu/
School of Nursing
4 Research College of Nursing
Mailing Address: 2525 E. Meyer Boulevard, Kansas City, MO 64132
Phone Number: (866) 855-0296
E-mail: leslie.mendenhall@researchcollege.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.researchcollege.edu/
College of Nursing
5 University of Missouri St. Louis
Mailing Address: 1 University Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63121
Phone Number: (314) 516-6066
E-mail: nursing@usml.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.umsl.edu/~nursingweb/
Barnes College of Nursing and Health Studies
6 Goldfarb School of Nursing at Barnes Jewish College
Address: 306 S. Kingshighway Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110-1091
Admissions Phone: (314) 454-7055 Admissions
E-mail: bjcon-admissions@bjc.org
Website Homepage: http://www.barnesjewishcollege.edu/
Goldfarb School of Nursing at Barnes Jewish College
7 Missouri State University
Mailing Address: Professional Building, Suite 300, Springfield, MO 65897
Phone Number: (417) 836-5310
E-mail: nursing@missouristate.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.missouristate.edu/nursing/
Department of Nursing
8 Southeast Missouri State University
Mailing Address: 1 University Plaza, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701
Phone Number: (573)651-2585
E-mail: ejackson@semo.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.semo.edu/nursing/
Department of Nursing
9 University of Central Missouri
Mailing Address: 2711 Clay Edwards Drive, North Kansas City, MO 64116
Phone Number: (660)543-4775
E-mail: clawson@ucmo.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.cmsu.edu/x24658.xml
Department of Nursing
10 Graceland University
Mailing Address: 1401 W. Truman Road, Independence, MO 64050-3434
Phone Number: (866) 893-6965
E-mail: distancelearning@graceland.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.graceland.edu/nursing/
School of Nursing
11 Maryville University of St. Louis
Mailing Address: 650 Maryville University Drive, St. Louis, MO 63141
Phone Number: (314)529-9625
E-mail: cgulas@maryville.edu
Website Homepage: http://www.maryville.edu/academics-hp.htm
School of Health Professions
12 Webster University
Mailing Address: Graduate and Evening Student Admissions, Kansas City, MO 63119
Website Homepage: http://www.webster.edu/depts/artsci/nursing/
Nursing Department

Best Colleges for Nursing in Missouri

Modern History of Missouri

During the American Civil War, the population of Missouri was divided: some of the residents of the state supported the southerners and their desire to maintain legal slavery, and some of the northerners supported their ideas about the emancipation of black slaves. During the war years, Missouri actually had two governments, one of which recognized the jurisdiction of the Confederacy, and the other – the Union. More than a hundred thousand Missourians fought on the side of the North, more than forty thousand people came out for the southerners with weapons in their hands. Missouri experienced more armed confrontations during the war years than any other US state except Virginia and Tennessee .. In addition to regular military units, numerous unorganized, guerrilla units operated throughout the state, some of which were actually gangs of robbers and continued to rob and kill for several years after the end of the war (for example, the infamous murderers and robbers Jesse James and “Bloody Bill” Anderson).

Missouri suffered greatly from the battles of the Civil War. The transportation of goods along the Mississippi practically ceased, numerous hydraulic structures were destroyed, and dozens of steamships were flooded. At the same time, in the post-war decades, the state’s economy became more diverse, animal husbandry (primarily dairy), brewing began to develop, railroads were built, industry developed, and the urban population increased.

At the beginning of the 20th century, Missouri, as well as throughout the country, underwent serious reforms in public life. Women were granted the right to vote, a number of laws were passed to protect children, and the fight against racial discrimination was intensified.

The Great Depression took a very heavy toll on the state’s economy. The volumes of mining, industrial production, cargo transportation, retail sales have sharply decreased. Tens of thousands of people were left without work, St. Louis was especially hard hit by the crisis. The situation in agriculture in Missouri was further complicated by several droughts, which followed one after another, and an invasion of locusts. However, it was much easier for farmers to live, and many urban residents who lost their jobs moved to rural areas.

Some recovery in the economy of Missouri was indicated only by the end of the thirties, and the beginning of World War II and a sharp increase in demand for industrial and agricultural products provided not only full employment for the population, but also the creation of many new enterprises.

State farmers, thanks to federal rural electrification programs and the promotion of new, more progressive farming methods, have been able to significantly increase their output. In the cities of Missouri, primarily in St. Louis and Kansas City, they produced ammunition and a variety of military equipment, including aircraft. In addition, in 1940, the Fort Leonard Wood military base was established in Missouri, which became the largest engineering training center in the United States.

There have been many major changes in Missouri in recent decades. The number of farms has more than halved, but the remaining ones have grown significantly, as have the volumes of their products. The extraction of minerals, primarily lead ores, has become very important for the economy of Missouri. The urban population has significantly increased, having survived the ups and downs and crises of individual industrial sectors (meat processing, clothing and footwear industries). Today in Missouri, as in other US states, special attention is paid to the development of modern, high-tech and knowledge-intensive industries, including the automotive and defense industries.