Top Math Schools in North Carolina

By | April 19, 2019

Offers latest ranking of top schools for mathematics in North Carolina. You can learn what the top-ranked math colleges and universities are in North Carolina, and compare the best math colleges on TopSchoolsintheUSA.com. Search the top graduate schools in math, view school profiles, and contact information for all 4 mathematics colleges in North Carolina. Also check bridgat for a full list of graduate schools in the state of North Carolina.

Top Math Schools in North Carolina

School Rank Graduate Mathematics
1 Duke University
Mathematics Department
Address: Box 90320 , Durham, NC 27708-0320
Admissions Phone: (919) 660-2800
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.duke.edu
2 University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill
Department of Mathematics
Address: CB #3250, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3250
Admissions Phone: (919) 962-1294
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.unc.edu
3 North Carolina State University–Raleigh
Department of Mathematics
Address: Box 8205, Raleigh, NC 27695-8205
Admissions Phone: (919) 513-2296
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.ncsu.edu
4 University of North Carolina–Charlotte
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Address: 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001
Admissions Phone: (704) 687-4929
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.uncc.edu

Recent History of the State of North Carolina

In 1799, twelve-year-old Conrad Reid found a strange seven-kilogram “stone” that for the next three years propped up the doors on the family farm. Only in 1802, the boy’s father, John Reed, showed the find to the jeweler, who identified it as a gold nugget. Reed began mining gold on his land (and subsequently became rich), and a gold rush began in North Carolina. Although not comparable in scale to the California or Alaska gold rush, these were the first gold deposits discovered in the United States. In 1835, the seventh President of the United States, Andrew Jackson, signed into law the creation of a branch of the Mint in Charlotte, and in 1966 the John Reed Mine received the status of a US National Historic Landmark.

Throughout the first half of the 19th century, rural residents dominated the population of North Carolina, in 1860 more than ten thousand people lived in Wilmington alone, and in the capital of the state, Raleigh, there were a little more than five thousand residents. It was then that due to the extreme “patriarchy” and unwillingness to change, North Carolina received the nickname “Rip Van Winkle State” (after the hero of the story, Washington Irving, who slept for twenty years and hopelessly lagged behind progress).

The construction of roads significantly revived the economy of North Carolina, including the “Buncombe Highway”, which connected South Carolina with Tennessee and passed through Asheville in the west of the state, as well as the “farm railway” (actually not rail, but paved with boards) in the agricultural area. Piedmont. In 1840, a railway connection opened between the Port of Wilmington and Raleigh, nine years later the line was extended to Greensboro and Charlotte.

By the early 1960s, about a third of North Carolina’s population was made up of black slaves. Most of them lived and worked on the plantations of Tidewater (coastal areas), while there were practically no slaves in the western districts. This situation caused a very controversial attitude towards slavery among the residents of the state and, as a result, influenced the participation of North Carolina in the Civil War. The “old northern state” was the last state to secede from the United States and become part of the Confederation, many farmers from the mountainous regions evaded service in the army of the southerners and from paying taxes, about 15,000 people fought on the side of the Union. Nevertheless, North Carolina gave over 125,000 soldiers to the Confederate military, more than any other state in the US South.