Top Math Schools in New York

By | April 19, 2019

Offers latest ranking of top schools for mathematics in New York. You can learn what the top-ranked math colleges and universities are in New York, and compare the best math colleges on TopSchoolsintheUSA.com. Search the top graduate schools in math, view school profiles, and contact information for all 11 mathematics colleges in New York. Also check bridgat for a full list of graduate schools in the state of New York.

Top Math Schools in New York

School Rank Graduate Mathematics
1 Columbia University
Department of Mathematics
Address: 2990 Broadway, New York, NY 10027
Admissions Phone: (212) 854-4308
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.columbia.edu
2 New York University
Department of Mathematics
Address: 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012-1185
Admissions Phone: (212) 998-3238
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.nyu.edu
3 Cornell University
Department of Mathematics
Address: 551 Malott Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-4201
Admissions Phone: (607) 255-3624
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.cornell.edu
4 Stony Brook University–SUNY
Department of Mathematics
Address: Math Building P-143, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3651
Admissions Phone: (631) 632-8282
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.sunysb.edu
5 CUNY–Graduate Center
Department of Mathematics
Address: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016-4309
Admissions Phone: (212) 817-8530
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.gc.cuny.edu
6 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Address: 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180
Admissions Phone: (518) 276-6414
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.rpi.edu
7 University of Rochester
Department of Mathematics
Address: RC Box 270138, Rochester, NY 14627
Admissions Phone: (585) 275-9422
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.rochester.edu
8 University at Buffalo–SUNY
Department of Mathematics
Address: 244 Mathematics Building, Buffalo, NY 14260-2900
Admissions Phone: (716) 645-6284
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.buffalo.edu
9 Syracuse University
Department of Mathematics
Address: 215 Carnegie, Syracuse, NY 13244-1150
Admissions Phone: (315) 443-1499
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.syr.edu
10 University at Albany–SUNY
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Address: 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222
Admissions Phone: (518) 442-4602
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.albany.edu
11 Binghamton University–SUNY
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Admissions Phone: (607) 777-2147
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.binghamton.edu

Niagara Falls

Niagara Falls (or Niagara) is the most famous waterfall in the United States and one of America’s most popular tourist attractions.

It is located on the Niagara River, which connects Lakes Erie and Ontario (and separates the US state of New York from Canada), about thirty kilometers from the city of Buffalo. On both banks of the river, Canadian and American, small towns with the same names grew up – Niagara Falls (“Niagara Falls”).

The name of the famous waterfall comes from the language of the Indians who lived here – the Iroquois and means, according to different versions, either “dividing in half”, or, more poetically, “thundering water”.

Niagara Falls appeared several thousand years ago, when streams of water formed as a result of the melting of a retreating glacier washed their channel in soft sandstones. The Niagara River carved a deep gorge into them until the harder rock was exposed. So it turned out a cliff, from which thousands of tons of water fall down. The characteristic greenish color of Niagara is due precisely to the high content of rock particles dissolved in the waters of the river.

It is believed that in ten thousand years the waterfall has risen about eleven kilometers upstream of the river, this movement continues today at a rate of about thirty centimeters per year. According to scientists, in about fifty thousand years, the cliff will reach Lake Erie and Niagara Falls will cease to exist.

As can be clearly seen on the aerial photograph, Niagara is a complex of waterfalls, the total width of which is more than a kilometer. Goat Island (Goat) divides the river into two branches, forming the “Canadian” and “American” parts of the waterfall. The Canadian part of the waterfall is called because of the characteristic shape of the “Horseshoe”, from the US side, a small island of the Moon separates a narrow strip of the “Veil” waterfall from the “American Falls”.

The main volume of Niagara’s water flows through the Horseshoe Falls (up to 90%). The width of the waterfall is about 670 meters, the depth in the central part is about 3 meters. Streams of water cross the crest of the waterfall at a speed of about 32 kilometers per hour and fall 53 meters down.

The width of the American Falls is about 250 meters, the depth of the river on the crest is about 60 centimeters. Numerous rockfalls formed a huge stone embankment at the foot of the waterfall, so the height of the water fall here is much lower than at the Horseshoe – from 21 to 34 meters.

Near the American is the smallest of the Niagara Falls – Fata. It is only 17 meters wide and 24 meters high.

In June 1969, the US Army Corps of Engineers built a temporary dam and drained the American side of Niagara. This was done in order to survey and strengthen the rapidly collapsing waterfall. Already in November of the same year, the dam was blown up and the river returned to its course. Interestingly, the “dry” Niagara Falls attracted even more tourists than usual.

Sometimes, during especially severe winters, Niagara Falls partially or completely freezes. “Ice Falls” is also a very unusual sight.

Millions of tourists visit Niagara Falls every year. They offer a cable car, observation decks and towers, paths and galleries for pedestrians, helicopter tours and even a hot air balloon. In the summer, after dark and until midnight, the waterfalls are illuminated by colored spotlights.

But the most popular tourist attraction for more than a hundred and fifty years has been a trip under the falls on pleasure boats, which traditionally bear the name “Maid of the Mist”. Tours depart from both the Canadian and American sides of the falls, and it is on them that tourists hiding from splashes and fog under capes can fully appreciate the strength and beauty of Niagara.

The Niagara Falls area has the status of a state protected area – it is the oldest reserve in the state of New York, created back in 1885.

More water flows through Niagara Falls than any other waterfall in North America (up to 5,700,000 liters per second). The energy of this stream is successfully used to generate electricity, so that Niagara is not only the object of attention of numerous tourists, but also a very important factor for the economy of New York State.

The first power plant in Niagara was built in 1881. It was repeatedly modernized and successfully used until 1951, when it was destroyed by a landslide. Already in 1957, the US Congress decided to build a new, one of the largest in the world at that time, hydroelectric power station on the Niagara River. In 1961, construction was completed, and the new hydroelectric power plant was named after the famous New York city planner Robert Moses. Water for the operation of the power plant is taken upstream from the waterfall, and is discharged below.

Niagara Falls attracts many daredevils – “extremals”. Back in 1829, Rhode Island native Sam Patch became famous after jumping into Niagara at the foot of the falls. In 1859, the Frenchman Charles Blondin became the first person to cross from coast to coast on a rope stretched at a height of about fifty meters above the Niagara Gorge.

On October 24, 1901, Michigan schoolteacher Annie Taylor became the first person to ride down Niagara Falls in a barrel and survive. In such an original way, Annie Taylor celebrated her sixty-third birthday, and at the same time she went down in history.

Annie Taylor’s trick haunted numerous followers. The first person to replicate her original feat was Bobby Leach in 1911. If Annie “dived” into the waterfall in an oak barrel, albeit with specially reinforced steel and upholstered with soft material, then the Lich used steel. After falling from a waterfall, he was seriously injured and spent six months in the hospital.

Attempting to go down Niagara Falls is illegal in both the US and Canada, however, more and more daredevils periodically appear who want to become famous in this way.

Niagara Falls is traditionally included in various ratings of the most beautiful places in the US and is one of the most interesting attractions in the US.