Top Math Schools in New Jersey

By | April 19, 2019

Offers latest ranking of top schools for mathematics in New Jersey. You can learn what the top-ranked math colleges and universities are in New Jersey, and compare the best math colleges on TopSchoolsintheUSA.com. Search the top graduate schools in math, view school profiles, and contact information for all 5 mathematics colleges in New Jersey. Also check bridgat for a full list of graduate schools in the state of New Jersey.

Top Math Schools in New Jersey

School Rank Graduate Mathematics
1 Princeton University
Department of Mathematics
Address: Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544-1000
Admissions Phone: (609) 258-4200
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.princeton.edu
2 Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey–New Brunswick
Department of Mathematics
Address: 110 Frelinghuysen Road , Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019
Admissions Phone: (732) 445-2390
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.rutgers.edu
3 Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey–Newark
Mathematics & Computer Science
Address: 249 University Avenue, Newark, NJ 07102
Admissions Phone: (973) 353-5156
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.newark.rutgers.edu
4 New Jersey Institute of Technology
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Address: University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102
Admissions Phone: (973) 596-3484
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.njit.edu
5 Stevens Institute of Technology
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Address: Kidde Building, Hoboken, NJ 07030
Admissions Phone: (201) 216-5436
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.stevens.edu

History of the State of New Jersey Before Independence

The owners of New Jersey provided the land to anyone who wanted it, requiring only the payment of an annual rent. In New Jersey, freedom of religion was proclaimed, which made the colony attractive to immigrants. People moved here not only from Europe, but also from the predominantly Puritan colonies of Virginia and Massachusetts.

In 1674, John Berkeley sold his lands to the Quakers, who later bought East Jersey from the widow of George Carteret. New Jersey served as a springboard for William Penn’s creation of the “Quaker” colony of Pennsylvania.

In 1680, after the death of George Carteret, Edmund Andros, governor of the colony of New York, unsuccessfully tried to establish control over East Jersey. From 1686 to 1689, both provinces of New Jersey were part of the Dominion of New England, which administratively united all the British colonies in North America. In 1702, East and West Jersey lost their status as private estates, were merged and became the royal colony of New Jersey. The border between New Jersey and New York was not strictly defined, which caused numerous clashes between the colonists, the last of which occurred in 1765.

The College of New Jersey was founded in Elizabethtown in 1746 and moved to Newark in 1747 and to Princeton in 1756. Today it is Princeton University, one of the most prestigious Ivy League universities in the United States.

New Jersey became one of thirteen North American colonies that rebelled against the British crown. On July 2, 1776, two days before the Second Continental Congress declared American independence, the New Jersey Constitution was adopted (though with the proviso that it would be repealed subject to reconciliation with Great Britain).

During the American Revolutionary War, more battles and armed clashes took place in New Jersey than in any other US state, because of this, New Jersey received the nickname “Crossroads of the Revolution”, and the city of Morristown, in which the headquarters was located George Washington was called “the military capital of the American Revolution”.

On the night of Christmas 1776, the Continental Army under the command of the future first US President, General George Washington, crossed the Delaware River and attacked the Hessian (German) soldiers who fought on the side of the British Empire. In the battle known as the “Battle of Trenton”, the Americans defeated the enemy almost without loss. Washington’s army won the next victories on January 2, 1777 during the “Second Battle of Trenton” and on January 3 in the “Battle of Princeton”. Described later as “The Decisive Ten Days,” these victories forced the British to retreat from New Jersey and proved the young American nation’s ability to win.