Top Math Schools in Montana

By | April 19, 2019

Offers latest ranking of top schools for mathematics in Montana. You can learn what the top-ranked math colleges and universities are in Montana, and compare the best math colleges on TopSchoolsintheUSA.com. Search the top graduate schools in math, view school profiles, and contact information for all 2 mathematics colleges in Montana. Also check bridgat for a full list of graduate schools in the state of Montana.

Top Math Schools in Montana

School Rank Graduate Mathematics
1 Montana State University
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Address: PO Box 172400, Bozeman, MT 59717-2400
Admissions Phone: (406) 994-3601
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.montana.edu
2 University of Montana
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Admissions Phone: (406) 243-5311
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.umt.edu

History of the US anthem

Until 1931, there was no officially recognized national anthem in the United States. Very often, the song Hail, Columbia (“Long live Columbia”) was used as such. The music for this song, also known as the “Presidential March”, was written in 1789 by Philip File for the inauguration of the first US President, George Washington. In 1798, Joseph Hopkinson wrote the lyrics to the song. “Long Live Colombia” remains one of the most popular patriotic songs in the United States today.

The lyrics to The Star-Spangled Banner, which later became the US national anthem, were written in 1814. They were written by an amateur poet, a lawyer by profession, thirty-five-year-old Francis Scott Key.

On September 3, 1814, Francis Scott Key and John Stuart Skinner, a lawyer and publisher, sailed from Baltimore to negotiate with the British. There was a military conflict between Great Britain and the United States, known as the “Second War of American Independence”, and the purpose of the negotiations was to reach an agreement on the exchange of prisoners. Francis Key and John Skinner acted on behalf of US President James Madison.

At first, the British did not compromise, but Key and Skinner showed the British commanders letters from wounded British soldiers captured by the Americans, in which they spoke very favorably of the conditions of detention and thanked for the medical care. As a result, an agreement was reached. Despite the end of the negotiations, the American truce continued to stay aboard the British flagship Tonnant (“Thunderer”), as they heard about the British plans to attack Baltimore.

From the Thunderbolt, Francis Key watched the British bombardment of Fort McHenry, which was defending Baltimore. He saw a large American flag flying over the fort during the shelling and gales. Inspired by what he saw, Francis Key composes a poem called “The Defense of Fort McHenry” and writes it down on the back of a letter in his pocket.

After the return of Francis Key home, his relative Judge Joseph Nicholson noticed that the poem written by Francis fits well with the music of “Anthem of Anacreon”. The new patriotic song quickly became popular in the United States.

The US national anthem is sung to music written in 1766 by the English musicologist, organist and singer John Stafford Smith. The melody was written as a humorous hymn to the Society of Anacreon, a London gentleman’s club of amateur musicians whose meetings were usually devoted to “wit, harmony, and the god of wine.” Later, it became very common as a drinking song, namely as a “sobriety test”. The fact is that the melody of the “Hymn of Anacreon” is quite complex, and if a gentleman could sing at least one stanza without errors, it was believed that he could well continue drinking. “Anacreon’s Hymn” was very popular both in Britain and America. Very soon after the words “The Star Spangled Banner” were written,

Since 1889, “The Star Spangled Banner” has been the official song of the US Navy, since 1916 – the anthem of the President of the United States. On March 3, 1931, the thirty-first President of the United States, Herbert Hoover, signed a resolution of the US Congress, which recognized the “Star Spangled Banner” as the official anthem of the United States of America.