Top Math Schools in Maryland

By | April 19, 2019

Offers latest ranking of top schools for mathematics in Maryland. You can learn what the top-ranked math colleges and universities are in Maryland, and compare the best math colleges on TopSchoolsintheUSA.com. Search the top graduate schools in math, view school profiles, and contact information for all 3 mathematics colleges in Maryland. Also check bridgat for a full list of graduate schools in the state of Maryland.

Top Math Schools in Maryland

School Rank Graduate Mathematics
1 University of Maryland–College Park
Department of Mathematics
Address: Mathematics Building, College Park, MD 20742-4015
Admissions Phone: (301) 405-5058
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.umd.edu
2 Johns Hopkins University
Department of Mathematics
Address: 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218
Admissions Phone: (410) 516-7397
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.mathematics.jhu.edu
3 University of Maryland–Baltimore County
Department of Mathematics & Statistics
Address: 1000 Hilltop Circle , Baltimore, MD 21250
Admissions Phone: (410) 455-2434
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.umbc.edu

Modern History of Maryland

Despite the fact that Maryland was founded by Catholics, from the first days of its existence, freedom of religion was not limited in it (even on the first two ships, the majority were Protestants). Nevertheless, over the following decades, it was on religious grounds that several conflicts occurred both with neighboring Virginia and between the residents of Maryland itself. In 1638, Leonard Calvert (then governor of the colony) seized the trading post established in Maryland by William Claiborne, one of Virginia’s wealthiest and most respected citizens and politicians. In 1644, Claiborne led a protestant rebellion in Maryland, Calvert fled and only in 1646 was able to regain control of the colony.

In 1649, in Maryland, at the initiative of the Calvert family, who sought to protect Catholics, the Religious Toleration Act, one of the first such laws in the American colonies, was passed. In the 1750s, conflicts continued between the legitimate governor and the predominantly Puritan legislative assembly of Maryland, only in 1658 the second Baron Baltimore was again able to fully control the colony.

In 1675, after the death of Cecilius Calvert, his son Charles became the third Baron Baltimore and the new owner of Maryland. In 1681, when King Charles II of England transferred the rights to create a new colony of Pennsylvania to William Penn, a border conflict arose between Maryland and its new northern neighbor. The fact is that at one time in the royal charter the territory of Maryland was defined as located between the fortieth parallel from the north and the Potomac River from the south. The fortieth parallel was also named as the southern boundary of Pennsylvania, but if this condition were met, then Philadelphia, which William Penn laid out as the capital of his colony, would be in the lands of Maryland. Charles II proposed a compromise, but after Penn also received rights to the territory of the modern state in 1682 Delaware (before actually owned by Maryland), negotiations broke down and the issue remained unresolved for many decades to come.

In the second half of the 17th century, most Maryland colonists lived on small farms, with tobacco being the main cash crop. It was so profitable to grow it that the colonial authorities, in order to avoid the threat of famine, were forced to pass a law obliging farmers to sow grains along with tobacco. Tobacco price fluctuations, as well as crop failures due to natural conditions, greatly affected the economy of Maryland.