Top Math Schools in California

By | April 19, 2019

Offers latest ranking of top schools for mathematics in California. You can learn what the top-ranked math colleges and universities are in California, and compare the best math colleges on TopSchoolsintheUSA.com. Search the top graduate schools in math, view school profiles, and contact information for all 12 mathematics colleges in California. Also check bridgat for a full list of graduate schools in the state of California.

Top Math Schools in California

School Rank Graduate Mathematics
1 Stanford University
Department of Mathematics
Address: 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-2125
Admissions Phone: (650) 725-6284
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.stanford.edu
2 University of California–Berkeley
Department of Mathematics
Address: 970 Evans Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-3840
Admissions Phone: (510) 642-6550
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.berkeley.edu
3 California Institute of Technology
Department of Mathematics
Address: Mathematics 253-37 , Pasadena, CA 91125-3700
Admissions Phone: (626) 395-4335
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.caltech.edu
4 University of California–Los Angeles
Department of Mathematics
Address: Box 951555, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1555
Admissions Phone: (310) 825-4701
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.ucla.edu
5 University of California–San Diego
Department of Mathematics
Address: 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0112
Admissions Phone: (858) 534-3590
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.ucsd.edu
6 University of California–Davis
Department of Mathematics
Address: 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616
Admissions Phone: (530) 752-0827
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.ucdavis.edu
7 University of California–Irvine
Department of Mathematics
Address: 340 Rowland Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-3875
Admissions Phone: (949) 824-5503
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.uci.edu
8 University of California–Santa Barbara
Department of Mathematics
Address: South Hall, Room 6607, Santa Barbara, CA 93106
Admissions Phone: (805) 893-2171
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.ucsb.edu
9 University of Southern California
Department of Mathematics
Address: 3620 S. Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2532
Admissions Phone: (213) 740-2400
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://math.usc.edu
10 Claremont Graduate University
School of Mathematical Sciences
Address: 710 N. College Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711
Admissions Phone: (909) 621-8080
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.cgu.edu
11 University of California–Riverside
Department of Mathematics
Address: 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521
Admissions Phone: (951) 827-3113
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://mathdept.ucr.edu
12 University of California–Santa Cruz
Department of Mathematics
Address: 194 Baskin Engineering , Santa Cruz, CA 95064
Admissions Phone: (831) 459-5461
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Admissions Website: http://www.math.ucsc.edu

Spanish California

Before the advent of Europeans, more than seventy American Indian peoples lived in the territory of the modern state of California – Modoc, Mojave, Oloni, Pomo, Chumash and many others. The fertile lands of the Pacific coast and the Central Valley of California, with their rich animal and plant life, were practically isolated from other regions of America by the ridges of the Cascade Mountains and the Klamath Mountains in the north, the Sierra Nevada mountains and the badlands of the Great Basin in the east, the Mojave and Colorado deserts in southeast. Because of these features of the nature of California, the culture of the Indians who lived here is not similar to other cultures of the indigenous peoples of North America.

The Indians of California were mainly engaged in gathering, hunting and fishing, only a few tribes living in the Colorado River region were engaged in agriculture. There were both nomadic and sedentary Indian peoples in California, but they did not build large settlements. Although trade was actively conducted between various groups, mixed marriages and military alliances were concluded, the California Indians did not have a single state structure.

It is believed that in the XVIII century, by the beginning of the European colonization of the region, about three hundred thousand Indians lived in California.

The first European to explore the coast of California in 1542 was Juan Cabrillo, a Portuguese by nationality, who organized a sea expedition on behalf of the viceroy of the New Spain colony. Cabrillo’s ships reached Point Reyes, about fifty kilometers north of present -day San Francisco. Juan Cabrillo was seriously injured and died during the expedition, a monument was erected in his honor in San Diego, which has the status of a US National Monument.

In 1579, the famous English navigator Sir Francis Drake landed on the California coast during his round-the-world voyage. He called these lands “New Albion”, now the place where the British supposedly landed is called Drakes Bay (“Drake’s Bay”).

In 1602-1603, the Spanish traveler Sebastian Vizcaino made a detailed description of the Californian coast. The maps he created were so accurate that they were used for the next two centuries.

In 1769, the Spaniard Gaspar de Portola led an expedition that founded “El Presidio Real de San Diego”, the first permanent European settlement on the Pacific coast, on the site of the modern city of San Diego. Immediately, the Franciscan monk Junipero Serra created the first Catholic mission in California – “San Diego de Alcala”. The following year, in 1770, Serra founded another mission, “San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo”, from which the modern city of Monterey grew.

In the following decades, until the beginning of the 19th century, the Spaniards increased their presence in California through the construction of new missions and fortified forts guarding them.

At the end of the 18th – beginning of the 19th century, large estates (ranches) were created in California, the breeding of cattle and sheep was the basis of the California economy in those years.

In 1821, Mexico defeated Spain in the War of Independence and the lands of California (as well as the modern states of Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and partly Colorado and Wyoming) became part of the Mexican province of Upper California (Alta California).

The new government passed a law under which those born outside of Mexico were declared “illegal immigrants” and were subject to deportation from the country. In addition, the property of the Catholic missions in California was declared state property. Most of the missionaries were forced to leave California, and many missions were destroyed.

The Hispanic population of California declined sharply and in the forties of the XIX century was only about ten thousand people, living mainly on large ranches.