Top Education Schools in Texas

By | April 28, 2018

Your search has generated 22 top-ranked education schools in Texas. These colleges offer graduate study in field of education, leading to an Master degree. Check out the following table to see a list of major educational schools in the state of Texas, each with enrollment statistics, tuition fees and contact information.

  • USAERS: Lists of major rivers and mountains within state of Texas. Also includes main lakes and reservoirs in Texas.

List of Best Education Colleges in Texas

Rank Education University
1 University of Texas–Austin
1 University Station, D5000, Sanchez Building Room 210
Austin, TX 78712
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $7,798 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,166 per year
Enrollment: 789
2 Texas A&M University–College Station
4222 TAMUS
College Station, TX 77843
School: College of Education & Human Development
In-State Tuition: $227 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $537 per credit
Enrollment: 609
3 Baylor University
1 Bear Place #97304
Waco, TX 76798
School: School of Education
In-State Tuition: $1,124 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $1,124 per credit
Enrollment: 149
4 University of Houston
4800 Calhoun Road, Farish Hall
Houston, TX 77204
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $358 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $668 per credit
Enrollment: 384
5 Texas Tech University
Box 41071
Lubbock, TX 79409
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $229 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $539 per credit
Enrollment: 328
6 University of North Texas
1155 Union Circle #311337
Denton, TX 76203
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $239 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $549 per credit
Enrollment: 409
7 University of Texas–San Antonio
1 UTSA Circle
San Antonio, TX 78249
School: College of Education and Human Development
In-State Tuition: $232 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $852 per credit
Enrollment: 475
8 Texas Christian University
3000 Bellaire Drive N
Fort Worth, TX 76129
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $1,040 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $1,040 per credit
Enrollment: 64
9 Texas State University–San Marcos
601 University Drive
San Marcos, TX 78666
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $4,338 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $9,918 per year
Enrollment: 559
10 Texas Woman’s University
PO Box 425769
Denton, TX 76204
School: Graduate School
In-State Tuition: $213 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $523 per credit
Enrollment: 214
11 University of Texas–El Paso
500 W. University Avenue
El Paso, TX 79968
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: N/A
Out-of-State Tuition: N/A
Enrollment: 237
12 Texas A&M University–Commerce
PO Box 3011
Commerce, TX 75429
School: College of Education and Human Services
In-State Tuition: N/A
Out-of-State Tuition: N/A
Enrollment: 924
13 Stephen F. Austin State University
PO Box 13024, SFA Station
Nacogdoches, TX 75962
School: James I. Perkins College of Education
In-State Tuition: $200 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $510 per credit
Enrollment: 240
14 Lamar University
PO Box 10034, Lamar University Station
Beaumont, TX 77710
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $4,244 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $10,444 per year
Enrollment: 99
15 Sam Houston State University
PO Box 2119
Huntsville, TX 77341
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $213 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $523 per credit
Enrollment: 182
16 Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi
6300 Ocean Drive
Corpus Christi, TX 78412
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $178 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $488 per credit
Enrollment: 250
17 University of Texas–Pan American
1201 W. University Drive
Edinburg, TX 78541
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $3,794 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $9,374 per year
Enrollment: 71
18 University of the Incarnate Word
4301 Broadway
San Antonio, TX 78209
School: Dreeben School of Education
In-State Tuition: $695 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $695 per credit
Enrollment: 16
19 Our Lady of the Lake University
411 S.W. 24th Street
San Antonio, TX 78207
School: Education Department
In-State Tuition: N/A
Out-of-State Tuition: N/A
Enrollment: N/A
20 Tarleton State University
Box T-0350
Stephenville, TX 76402
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: N/A
Out-of-State Tuition: N/A
Enrollment: N/A
21 Texas A&M University–Kingsville
700 University Boulevard
Kingsville, TX 78363
School: College of Education and Human Performance
In-State Tuition: N/A
Out-of-State Tuition: N/A
Enrollment: N/A
22 Texas Southern University
3100 Cleburne Street
Houston, TX 77004
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: N/A
Out-of-State Tuition: N/A
Enrollment: N/A

Top Education Schools in Texas

State of Texas before Independence

Since the appearance of European explorers on the territory of the modern state of Texas, it has been claimed (and, to a greater or lesser extent, controlled) by six states – France, Spain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, the Confederate States of America and the United States of America. The Lone Star State often refers to the “six flags of Texas,” referring to various periods of its history.

Of course, long before the Europeans, Indians lived on the lands of Texas. By the middle of the last millennium, the indigenous people of the state belonged to three main cultures: the ancestors of the Caddo people in the east (“mound builders”), the ancient Pueblos in the west, and the Mesoamerican Indians in the south. Later, under pressure from Europeans, Indians from the Apache, Kiowa, Wichita, Comanche and other tribes came to Texas. There are three officially recognized Indian peoples in Texas today: the Alabama, the Kickapoo, and the Pueblo.

The Spaniards were the first Europeans to come to Texas, already in 1519 Alonso Alvarez de Pineda sailed along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico and made his first map.

In 1528, in the region of Galveston Island, members of the Spanish expedition led by Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca crashed and were captured by the Indians. Only four people, including de Vaca himself, were able to escape after a few years and, after long wanderings, reach Mexico. Alvar Cabeza de Vaca became the first European explorer of the Texas hinterland.

In 1541, the expedition of the Spaniard Francisco de Coronado crossed northern Texas, who came in search of gold from Mexico through modern Arizona and New Mexico and reached Kansas through Oklahoma.

In 1542, from the east (through the territory of the states of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana) members of the Hernando de Soto expedition came to Texas. After the death of their leader, the Spaniards tried to reach Mexico by land, but having reached the desert and arid regions of central Texas, they were forced to return to the Mississippi. Here they built boats and sailed along the coast, safely reached Mexico City.

The first European settlement on the lands of Texas appeared in 1682, when the Spaniards, who fled from the Pueblo Indians who had rebelled in New Mexico, set up camp in the area of ​​the modern city of El Paso. Later, a mission was built here and the city grew.

In 1685, members of a French expedition led by René de La Salle landed on the coast of Texas in the Matagorda Bay area. La Salle ended up in Texas by mistake, he was looking for the mouth of the Mississippi River, where he wanted to establish a colony, but due to inaccurate maps and navigational errors, he landed six hundred kilometers to the west. The French lived for several months in a temporary camp on the island of Matagorda, and then moved eighty kilometers inland, founding Fort Saint-Louis. Over the next two years, the colonists constantly made attempts to find the Mississippi, sending out one reconnaissance party after another. Due to illness, hunger and clashes with the Indians, the number of residents of the settlement was constantly decreasing, and in January 1687, La Salle, with sixteen companions, left the fort he founded, heading for the French settlements in ” The country of Illinois “. During the trip, Rene de La Salle was killed due to a conflict that arose between the participants in the campaign, and only six members of the expedition managed to get to French Canada.

Leaving Fort Saint-Louis, La Salle left about twenty people in it, mostly women and children, who obviously could not endure the hardships of a long journey. The Spaniards, having heard about the existence of a new colony and did not want to allow a French presence in the region, began an active search for it. When in 1689 they finally discovered Fort Saint-Louis, it turned out that almost all of its residents were killed, and the buildings were destroyed by the Indians who attacked the French. Later, the Spaniards managed to free several captured children.