Top Education Schools in Tennessee

By | April 28, 2018

Your search has generated 8 top-ranked education schools in Tennessee. These colleges offer graduate study in field of education, leading to an Master degree. Check out the following table to see a list of major educational schools in the state of Tennessee, each with enrollment statistics, tuition fees and contact information.

  • USAERS: Lists of major rivers and mountains within state of Tennessee. Also includes main lakes and reservoirs in Tennessee.

List of Best Education Colleges in Tennessee

Rank Education University
1 Vanderbilt University
PO Box 327
Nashville, TN 37203
School: College of Education and Human Development
In-State Tuition: $1,623 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $1,623 per credit
Enrollment: 667
2 University of Tennessee–Knoxville
335 Claxton Complex
Knoxville, TN 37996
School: College of Education, Health and Human Sciences
In-State Tuition: $8,362 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $23,400 per year
Enrollment: 355
3 University of Memphis
215 Ball Hall
Memphis, TN 38152
School: College of Education, Health and Human Sciences
In-State Tuition: $8,738 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $20,334 per year
Enrollment: 333
4 East Tennessee State University
PO Box 70720
Johnson City, TN 37614
School: Claudius G. Clemmer College of Education
In-State Tuition: $6,676 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $18,500 per year
Enrollment: 325
5 Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, TN 37209
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $6,712 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $17,044 per year
Enrollment: 444
6 Tennessee Technological University
Box 5036
Cookeville, TN 38505
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $11,607 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $28,827 per year
Enrollment: 250
7 Trevecca Nazarene University
333 Murfreesboro Road
Nashville, TN 37210
School: School of Education
In-State Tuition: $435 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $435 per credit
Enrollment: 0
8 Union University
1050 Union University Drive
Jackson, TN 38305
School: College of Education & Human Studies
In-State Tuition: $395 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $395 per credit
Enrollment: 272

Top Education Schools in Tennessee

Early History of Tennessee

After the end of the “War with the French and Indians” in 1763, the northeastern regions of Tennessee were actively developed by English hunters and settlers. In 1772, a self-government body was even created here, known as the Watauga Association (after the name of the river flowing in North Carolina and Tennessee) and which became one of the first prototypes of a government independent of the metropolis. The British governor of Virginia, Lord Dunmore, called her a “dangerous example” for other colonists, and the twenty-sixth President of the United States Theodore Roosevelt wrote that Watauga’s settlers were the first Americans to establish a free and independent community. With the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, the Watauga Association declared support for the rebellious colonies and petitioned the government of Virginia to be included in the province. Refused, the Tennessees made a similar request to North Carolina, and in November 1777 became part of it as Washington County.

Dissatisfaction with the inattention of the government of North Carolina to the needs of its westernmost counties led in 1784 to the proclamation by delegates from all the then inhabited counties of East Tennessee of independence and the formation of the new state of “Frankland” (soon renamed “Franklin” in honor of one of the founding fathers of the United States). States of America Benjamin Franklin). Representatives of the new state applied to Congress for admission to the union, but did not get enough votes. In fact, the unrecognized state existed until 1789, when the Tennessee lands returned to North Carolina.

In 1790, the US government created the Southwest Territory, which included the modern state of Tennessee, and parts of Alabama and Mississippi. In 1795, the Tennessee Constitution was adopted, and on June 1, 1796, Tennessee became the sixteenth state of the United States, the first capital of the new state was the city of Knoxville.