Top Education Schools in North Carolina

By | April 28, 2018

Your search has generated 7 top-ranked education schools in North Carolina. These colleges offer graduate study in field of education, leading to an Master degree. Check out the following table to see a list of major educational schools in the state of North Carolina, each with enrollment statistics, tuition fees and contact information.

  • USAERS: Lists of major rivers and mountains within state of North Carolina. Also includes main lakes and reservoirs in North Carolina.

List of Best Education Colleges in North Carolina

Rank Education University
1 University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill
CB#3500, 101 Peabody Hall
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
School: School of Education
In-State Tuition: $6,363 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $21,093 per year
Enrollment: 384
2 University of North Carolina–Greensboro
329 Curry Building
Greensboro, NC 27402
School: School of Education
In-State Tuition: $3,727 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,207 per year
Enrollment: 335
3 University of North Carolina–Charlotte
9201 University City Boulevard
Charlotte, NC 28223
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $3,464 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $14,297 per year
Enrollment: 327
4 Appalachian State University
Edwin Duncan Hall
Boone, NC 28608
School: Reich College of Education
In-State Tuition: $3,420 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $14,520 per year
Enrollment: 320
5 Western Carolina University
Killian Building, Room 222
Cullowhee, NC 28723
School: College of Education and Allied Professions
In-State Tuition: $6,113 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,698 per year
Enrollment: 221
6 Gardner-Webb University
110 S. Main Street
Boiling Springs, NC 28017
School: Education Department
In-State Tuition: $317 per credit
Out-of-State Tuition: $317 per credit
Enrollment: 10
7 East Carolina University
E. Fifth Street
Greenville, NC 27858
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: N/A
Out-of-State Tuition: N/A
Enrollment: 0

Top Education Schools in North Carolina

History of North Carolina

In the territory of the modern state of North Carolina, for thousands of years, the indigenous residents of the North American continent, the Indians, lived. Since about 1000 AD, most of the Indian peoples of the state belonged to the “Mississippian culture”, also known as the “mound builders”. To this day, the Town Creek mound has survived, around which there was a permanent settlement around 1150 – 1400. Archaeological research, which has been carried out here for more than fifty years, has helped scientists learn a lot about the life of the Indians. Town Creek was designated a National Historic Landmark in the United States in 1966.

By the time the first European explorers appeared in North Carolina, the Pamlico and Roanoke Indian peoples (on the coast) lived; tuscarora, katoba (on the Piedmont Plateau); Cherokee (in mountainous areas) and others.

The first European to see the lands of the state was the Italian Giovanni da Verrazano (Verrazzano). In 1524, he sailed under the French flag from Cape Fear in North Carolina to Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island and produced the first (albeit very inaccurate) description of the coast.

The Spaniards continued to explore the region, in 1539-40 an expedition led by the famous conquistador Hernando de Soto passed through the territory of North Carolina (as well as Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi ). In 1567, another Spanish detachment came to North Carolina, led by Juan Pardo. It was he who built, not far from the modern city of Morganton, the first European settlement on the lands of the state – Fort San Juan (although a year later this fortification was captured and burned by the Indians).

Lost Colony

In 1584, the court of Queen Elizabeth I, Walter Raleigh (Raleigh), received from her the rights to create a colony in North America under the English flag. He sent an expedition that scouted a stretch of coast and islands in the region of modern Virginia and North Carolina and returned to England with samples of unknown plants and two Indians of the Croatoan people.