Top Education Schools in Louisiana

By | April 28, 2018

Your search has generated 5 top-ranked education schools in Louisiana. These colleges offer graduate study in field of education, leading to an Master degree. Check out the following table to see a list of major educational schools in the state of Louisiana, each with enrollment statistics, tuition fees and contact information.

  • USAERS: Lists of major rivers and mountains within state of Louisiana. Also includes main lakes and reservoirs in Louisiana.

List of Best Education Colleges in Louisiana

Rank Education University
1 Louisiana State University–Baton Rouge
221 Peabody Hall
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $4,551 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,358 per year
Enrollment: 301
2 Louisiana Tech University
PO Box 3163
Ruston, LA 71272
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $5,368 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $10,523 per year
Enrollment: 452
3 University of Louisiana–Monroe
Strauss Hall
Monroe, LA 71209
School: College of Education & Human Development
In-State Tuition: $2,990 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $10,286 per year
Enrollment: 69
4 Grambling State University
GSU Box 4305
Grambling, LA 71245
School: College of Education
In-State Tuition: $3,024 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $7,884 per year
Enrollment: 113
5 University of New Orleans
2000 Lakeshore Drive
New Orleans, LA 70148
School: College of Education & Human Development
In-State Tuition: $4,152 per year
Out-of-State Tuition: $14,828 per year
Enrollment: 219

Top Education Schools in Louisiana

Early History of Louisiana

For thousands of years before the arrival of European colonialists in the territory of the modern state of Louisiana , American Indians lived here. It was in the “Pelican State” that archaeologists discovered the oldest structures of the Indian culture of the “mound builders” in the United States – the Watson Break mound complex, which is over five thousand years old. Also known are the huge (more than a kilometer in diameter) concentric earthen ramparts of Poverty Point, built about three and a half thousand years ago.

Later, the “Mississippian culture” spread here, which was characterized by agriculture as the main occupation, a complex social structure, developed trade (including with remote regions), and, of course, the construction of mounds with flat tops that had ritual significance.

By the time the Europeans appeared on the lands of Louisiana, the Caddo (Caddo), Natchitoches, Tunic, Atakapa, Taensa and others peoples lived.

The first European explorers of Louisiana were the Spanish. Alonso Alvarez de Pineda explored the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico in 1519 and made the first map of the region. In 1528, conquistadors sailed from Florida to Texas under the leadership of Panfilo de Narvaez. In 1542, after the death of the Spanish pioneer Hernando de Soto, the members of his expedition descended from Arkansas along the Mississippi and headed further west to Mexico. Nevertheless, Spain, although it announced its claims to the entire coast of the Gulf, actually did not develop the lands of Louisiana.

In 1682, the famous French explorer Rene de La Salle reached the lower reaches of the Mississippi River from the north, from the Great Lakes. It was he who declared the territory explored by him from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico belonging to France and named it in honor of King Louis (Louis) XIV “Louisiana”. In 1699, the French built Fort La Belize at the mouth of the Mississippi, and in 1714 they founded the first permanent European settlement in Louisiana – a trading post on the Red River, which later grew into the city of Natchitoches.

New Orleans was founded in 1718, and four years later became the capital of the Louisiana colony. In 1721, a large group of settlers from Germany and Switzerland settled near it in the area that became known as the “German Coast”.

In 1765, several thousand French-speaking refugees expelled by the British from Acadia (the area of modern Maine and southeastern Canada) moved to Louisiana. They settled in the swampy lands of southwestern Louisiana, in a region now called “Acadiana”. The descendants of these settlers, nicknamed “Cajuns” (“Cajuns”), created their own unique culture (Cajun dialect of the French language, peculiar customs, music and cuisine) and today make up a significant part of the population of Louisiana. In 1778 – 1783, a large number of immigrants from the Spanish-owned Canary Islands came to Louisiana.