Top Chemistry Schools in Virginia

By | April 29, 2018

If you are going to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry within the state of Virginia, then you have come to the right place. On this website, you will find the 4 best chemistry schools in Virginia. Please note that these rankings are based on student reviews, graduation rates, and the academic surveys submitted by peer colleges and universities throughout Virginia.

  • TRANSPORTHINT: Basic information, such as location, land area, population, capital and nickname of Virginia. Also includes industry, economy, climate, geography and history of Virginia.

Top Chemistry Schools in Virginia

Ranking Graduate Chemistry
1 University of Virginia
Department of Chemistry

Address: McCormick Road , Charlottesville, VA 22904-4319
Phone: (434) 924-3344
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://chem.virginia.edu
2 Virginia Tech
Department of Chemistry

Address: 107 Davidson Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0001
Phone: (540) 231-5391
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.vt.edu
3 Virginia Commonwealth University
Department of Chemistry

Address: 1001 W. Main Street, Richmond, VA 23284-2006
Phone: (804) 826-1298
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.has.vcu.edu
4 College of William and Mary
Department of Chemistry

Address: PO Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
Phone: (757) 221-2540
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://wm.edu

Best Chemistry Colleges in Virginia

Virginia Before Independence

According to historians, people have lived in the territory of the modern state of Virginia for more than 12,000 years. In the 16th century, when the first Europeans appeared here, Indians belonging to three ethnic groups lived on the lands of Virginia – Algonquian, Sioux and Iroquois. The largest and most powerful were the Algonquian tribes that lived in the east coast (Tidewater) region. By the end of the 16th century, they were united by a leader named Powhatan, who controlled more than thirty small tribes and more than one hundred and fifty Indian settlements. Powhatan’s daughter, Pocahontas, played a large role in the development of the British colonies in Virginia and became one of the most famous and popular figures in US history and folklore.

The first Europeans on the territory of modern Virginia were the Spaniards, who came in 1540 from the south of the expedition of the famous pioneer Hernando de Sota. In 1561, the Spaniards discovered the Chesapeake Bay, and in 1570 they tried to establish a Jesuit mission here. Because of the conflict with the Indians in 1571, the priests were killed and the Spanish authorities no longer tried to develop this region.

The first English settlers appeared in Virginia at the beginning of the 17th century. In order to create colonies on the coast of North America, two joint-stock companies were created – the London Virginia Company and the Plymouth Virginia Company. On December 20, 1606, an expedition sailed from England in three ships under the leadership of Captain Christopher Newport, hired by the Virginia Company of London. After a long voyage, they arrived in the New World. On April 26, 1607, the travelers went ashore at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. This event in American history is called the “First Landing”.

The settlers named the landing place Cape Henry (Cape Henry). This name was chosen in honor of Prince Henry of Wales, the eldest son of the British King James. Now the largest city of Virginia, Virginia Beach, is located on this site.

In search of a convenient place to create a new colony, travelers sailed about sixty kilometers along the James River. Finally, on May 14, 1607, Edward Wingfield, the first leader of the colonists, chose a place for a new settlement – Jamestown. Both the river and the new settlement were named after the reigning monarch.

It was Jamestown that became the first permanent English settlement in the modern United States. Although there is now no settlement on the site of historic Jamestown, it is considered a US Historic Landmark. In 2007, celebrations were held across the United States to mark the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown.

Although the place chosen by the settlers to found Jamestown was very convenient in terms of organizing defense, it turned out to be unsuccessful for farming and hunting, and there was also not enough drinking water. The new colony was not initially self-sufficient and was heavily dependent on food supplies from England. Attempts to establish trade and good neighborly relations with the natives of Virginia were unsuccessful. Many of the colonists died from disease, starvation, and conflict with the Indians. In Jamestown, one after another, the leaders of the colony were replaced.