Top Chemistry Schools in Utah

By | April 29, 2018

If you are going to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry within the state of Utah, then you have come to the right place. On this website, you will find the 3 best chemistry schools in Utah. Please note that these rankings are based on student reviews, graduation rates, and the academic surveys submitted by peer colleges and universities throughout Utah.

  • TRANSPORTHINT: Basic information, such as location, land area, population, capital and nickname of Utah. Also includes industry, economy, climate, geography and history of Utah.

Top Chemistry Schools in Utah

Ranking Graduate Chemistry
1 University of Utah
Department of Chemistry

Address: 315 S. 1400 E, Room 2020, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0850
Phone: (801) 581-6681
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.utah.edu
2 Utah State University
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Address: 0300 Old Main Hill, Logan , UT 84322-0300
Phone: (435) 797-1618
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.usu.edu
3 Brigham Young University–Provo
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Address: C100 Benson Science Building, Provo, UT 84602
Phone: (801) 422-3667
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.byu.edu

Best Chemistry Colleges in Utah

History of Utah

On the territory of the modern state of Utah, long before the appearance of the first Europeans, there lived Indians belonging to the Anasazi (ancient Pueblo) and Fremont cultures. Around the middle of the last millennium, their settlements fell into decay, and later, in the 18th century, the Navajo, Goshut, Paiute, Shoshone, and Ute peoples (who gave the name to the future state) moved to Utah.

The first European explorers of Utah were the Spaniards. Perhaps the expedition of Francisco de Coronado, who was looking for the legendary “golden cities”, passed through the southwestern lands of Utah in 1540. It is authentically known that in 1776 Utah was studied by a group of Spaniards under the leadership of Catholic priests Francisco Dominguez and Silvestre de Escalante, who, with the help of Indian guides, were looking for a way from New Mexico to the California coast . They reached Lake Utah, and later the route they explored became part of the “Old Spanish Trail” that connected Santa Fe and Los Angeles.

The first European to see the Great Salt Lake is the famous American hunter and pioneer Jim Bridger. He reached its shores in 1824, and due to the extremely high salinity of the water in the lake, he mistook it for the Gulf of the Pacific Ocean. Also in the twenties of the XIX century, the lands of Utah were explored by Etienne Provost, Peter Ogden, Jedediah Smith and other pioneers of the US West.

Initially, American interest in Utah was limited to fur hunting, but by 1830, the fur trade in the region had declined. Again, Europeans appeared in Utah in the forties, when numerous groups of immigrants rushed to the west coast, to Oregon and California. In 1846, the American merchant Miles Goodyear founded the first permanent settlement in Utah, Fort Buenoventura, which grew into the modern city of Ogden.