Top Chemistry Schools in Pennsylvania

By | April 29, 2018

If you are going to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry within the state of Pennsylvania, then you have come to the right place. On this website, you will find the 8 best chemistry schools in Pennsylvania. Please note that these rankings are based on student reviews, graduation rates, and the academic surveys submitted by peer colleges and universities throughout Pennsylvania.

  • TRANSPORTHINT: Basic information, such as location, land area, population, capital and nickname of Pennsylvania. Also includes industry, economy, climate, geography and history of Pennsylvania.

Top Chemistry Schools in Pennsylvania

Ranking Graduate Chemistry
1 University of Pennsylvania
Department of Chemistry

Address: 231 South 34th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323
Phone: (215) 898-8317
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.sas.upenn.edu
2 University of Pittsburgh
Department of Chemistry

Address: Chevron Science Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15260
Phone: (412) 624-8200
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.pitt.edu
3 Carnegie Mellon University
Department of Chemistry

Address: 4400 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Phone: (412) 268-1062
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.cmu.edu
4 Temple University
Department of Chemistry

Address: 130 Beury Hall , Philadelphia, PA 19122
Phone: (215) 204-7118
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.temple.edu
5 Lehigh University
Department of Chemistry

Address: 6 E. Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015
Phone: (610) 758-3470
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://cas.lehigh.edu
6 Drexel University
Department of Chemistry

Address: Disque Hall Room 305, Philadelphia, PA 19104-2875
Phone: (215) 895-2638
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.drexel.edu
7 Duquesne University
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Address: 308 Mellon Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15282
Phone: (412) 396-6340
Website: http://www.science.duq.edu
8 University of the Sciences in Philadelphia
Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

Address: 600 S. 43rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Phone: (215) 596-8556
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.gradschool.usp.edu

Best Chemistry Colleges in Pennsylvania

Liberty Bell

In connection with the increase in the number of people wishing to see the Liberty Bell with their own eyes, in 1848 the city authorities moved it to the first floor of Independence Hall, to the so-called Assembly Hall (where the Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution were signed), building a special pedestal for it. In 1853, US President Franklin Pierce called the bell a symbol of the American Revolution and freedom.

In 1876 Philadelphia hosted the first U.S. Independence Centenary World’s Fair. The organizers of the exhibition considered the possibility of using, along with other exhibits (among which, in particular, there was a fragment of the Statue of Liberty) and the famous bell. However, due to the danger of destruction, this idea was abandoned, and instead an enlarged (weighing 5,900 kg or 13,000 pounds – one thousand pounds for each founding state of the United States) copy was made. This bell, called the “Bell of the Century”, after the end of the exhibition was suspended from the bell tower of Independence Hall, where it is today.

In 1885, the Liberty Bell went on its first national tour, to an exhibition in New Orleans, Louisiana. The bell was transported by rail, making many stops, thanks to which thousands of Americans could see it. In 1893, the Philadelphia bell visited Chicago, but due to shaking during transportation, a new crack formed in it, and besides, souvenir hunters cut off small pieces from the precious exhibit. Going forward, the city of Philadelphia, which owned the bell, was very reluctant to grant permits for new rides, there were seven in total, the last of which was organized in 1915 for an exhibition in San Francisco, California.

During the World Wars, the Liberty Bell was one of the most popular patriotic symbols, Philadelphians called up for military service took the oath near it, the image of the bell was printed on posters calling for war bonds, etc. When, at the beginning of World War II, the Americans feared the possibility of a German invasion, the idea arose to transport the unique bell to Fort Knox, Kentucky, where the US gold reserves are stored, but due to numerous public protests, this plan was not realized. The Liberty Bell was symbolically rung on the days of the landings in Normandy (June 6, 1944), the victory over Germany (May 8, 1945) and over Japan (September 2, 1945).

Shortly after the end of the war, the city of Philadelphia decided to transfer to the US government the ability and duty of maintaining the Liberty Bell (while retaining ownership of it). In 1948, the corresponding decision was approved by the US Congress and the Liberty Bell, as well as Independence Hall and several nearby ancient buildings, became part of the Independence National Historical Park.

In the early 1970s, on the eve of the US Bicentennial, there was a proposal to move the Liberty Bell to a new, larger building, since the old Pennsylvania State House would certainly not have accommodated the millions of expected visitors. The corresponding decision was made and at the end of 1975 the bell was moved to a specially built glass pavilion, where it remained for almost thirty years. On October 9, 2003, the Liberty Bell moved again to a new, even larger building, built as part of the reconstruction of the Independence Mall complex.

Like any popular object, the Liberty Bell has many copies. So, in particular, to popularize the bonds issued in 1950, the US Treasury ordered fifty-five replicas of the famous bell, subsequently transferred to each of the forty-eight states that existed at that time, the US territories and the District of Columbia.

Today, the Liberty Bell remains one of Philadelphia ‘s most popular landmarks and one of the most famous symbols of the United States of America.