Top Chemistry Schools in North Carolina

By | April 29, 2018

If you are going to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry within the state of North Carolina, then you have come to the right place. On this website, you will find the 4 best chemistry schools in North Carolina. Please note that these rankings are based on student reviews, graduation rates, and the academic surveys submitted by peer colleges and universities throughout North Carolina.

  • TRANSPORTHINT: Basic information, such as location, land area, population, capital and nickname of North Carolina. Also includes industry, economy, climate, geography and history of North Carolina.

Top Chemistry Schools in North Carolina

Ranking Graduate Chemistry
1 University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill
Department of Chemistry

Address: Campus Box 3290, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290
Phone: (919) 843-7100
Website: http://www.chem.unc.edu
2 Duke University
Department of Chemistry

Address: 124 Science Drive, Durham, NC 27708-0354
Phone: (919) 660-1500
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.duke.edu
3 North Carolina State University–Raleigh
Department of Chemistry

Address: 2620 Yarbrough Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695
Phone: (919) 515-8912
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ncsu.edu
4 Wake Forest University
Chemistry Department

Address: Salem Hall, Box 7486, Winston-Salem, NC 27109
Phone: (336) 758-5325
Website: http://www.wfu.edu

Best Chemistry Colleges in North Carolina

North Carolina Geography

The fertile soils of Piedmont are well suited for agriculture, so it is not surprising that its territory is actively used for economic activity. This region is also home to most of the population of North Carolina. Nevertheless, a significant part of the Piedmont plateau in the state is covered with forests, mostly mixed.

A rather pronounced (with numerous rapids and waterfalls on rivers and streams) escarpment separates the Piedmont Plateau from the coastal plain, part of the Atlantic Lowland. Another natural boundary separating these regions is the strip of sandhills covered with pine forests, which once formed the coastline, stretching in the south of the state (and also in South Carolina).

The Coastal Plain is the largest of the North Carolina regions. These are vast, almost flat lowlands with sandy soils, on which pine forests grow; coastline indented by numerous bays and estuaries, along which there are many wetlands (Tidewater); ocean bays and islands. In the northeast of the state, the Inner Banks (“Inner Banks”) district is distinguished. Here are the bays of Albemarle Sound and Pamlico Sound (the largest bay on the east coast of the United States), which are separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a strip of barrier islands Outer Banks (“Outer Banks”). The waters around the Outer Banks Islands, due to the frequently changing currents and shoals (especially around Hatteras Island), have been infamous for centuries among navigators as the “graveyard of the Atlantic”.

Most of North Carolina has a humid subtropical climate, which is significantly influenced by the Atlantic Ocean. The islands and coastline have very mild winters and warm summers (average January temperature on Hatteras Island is between 4°C and 12°C, and in July between 23°C and 30°C); there is practically no snow here, and it rains relatively evenly all year round. In the Piedmont Plateau region, the seasons are more pronounced, with colder winters and hotter summers. Temperatures during the coldest winter month range from -1°C to 10°C in the state capital, Raleigh, and from 0°C to 11°C in North Carolina’s largest city, Charlotte. In summer, in July, in both these cities the average temperature is usually between 21°C and 32°C. In winter, sleet and hail often fall here. In the west, in the Appalachians (which protect the lands of the state from cold air masses, coming from the west), the climate is slightly cooler. In Asheville, January is typically between -3°C and 9°C and July is between 18°C ​​and 29°C, with snow falling every winter.

North Carolina, and especially its coastal regions and the Outer Banks, is often hit by hurricanes and tropical storms. Snowstorms are not uncommon in the central parts of the state in winter, with tornadoes in the spring, and severe thunderstorms in the summer.