Top Chemistry Schools in New York

By | April 29, 2018

If you are going to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry within the state of New York, then you have come to the right place. On this website, you will find the 12 best chemistry schools in New York. Please note that these rankings are based on student reviews, graduation rates, and the academic surveys submitted by peer colleges and universities throughout New York.

  • TRANSPORTHINT: Basic information, such as location, land area, population, capital and nickname of New York. Also includes industry, economy, climate, geography and history of New York.

Top Chemistry Schools in New York

Ranking Graduate Chemistry
1 Columbia University
Department of Chemistry

Address: 344 Havemeyer Hall, New York, NY 10027
Phone: (212) 854-2433
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.columbia.edu
2 Cornell University
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Address: 131A Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301
Phone: (607) 255-4139
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.cornell.edu
3 Stony Brook University–SUNY
Department of Chemistry

Phone: (631) 632-7880
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.stonybrook.edu
4 University of Rochester
Department of Chemistry

Address: Box 270216, Rochester, NY 14627-0216
Phone: (585) 275-0635
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.rochester.edu
5 New York University
Department of Chemistry

Address: 100 Washington Square E, Room 1001, New York, NY 10003-6688
Phone: (212) 260-8050
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://chemistry.fas.nyu.edu
6 University at Buffalo–SUNY
Department of Chemistry

Address: 360 Natural Sciences Complex, Buffalo, NY 14260-3000
Phone: (716) 645-6807
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chemistry.buffalo.edu
7 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Address: 120 Cogswell, Troy, NY 12180
Phone: (518) 276-6344
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.rpi.edu
8 Syracuse University
Department of Chemistry

Address: 1-014 Center for Science and Technology, Syracuse, NY 13244-4100
Phone: (315) 443-2925
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://chemistry.syr.edu
9 CUNY–Graduate Center
Ph.D. Program in Chemistry

Address: 365 Fifth Avenue, Room 4310, New York, NY 10016-4309
Phone: (212) 817-8135
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://web.gc.cuny.edu
10 University at Albany–SUNY
Department of Chemistry

Address: 1400 Washington Avenue, CH 122, Albany, NY 12222
Phone: (518) 442-4400
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.albany.edu
11 Binghamton University–SUNY
Department of Chemistry

Address: PO Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000
Phone: (607) 777-2517
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://chemistry.binghamton.edu
12 Polytechnic Institute of New York University
Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences

Address: 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201
Phone: (718) 260-3600
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.poly.edu

Best Chemistry Colleges in New York

Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty (Statue of Liberty, full name – Liberty Enlightening the World, “Liberty Enlightening the World”) is a majestic sculptural monument, one of the most popular attractions in New York and one of the most famous symbols of the United States.

The Statue of Liberty is installed on Liberty Island (Liberty Island, “Liberty Island”) in Upper New York Bay, near the southern tip of Manhattan and the coast of New Jersey. Liberty Island is owned by the US federal government, is directly administered by the US National Park Service, and, together with nearby Ellis Island (which hosted the largest immigrant reception center in the US for over sixty years, and now operates a museum), forms the Statue of Liberty National Monument..

It is believed that the idea of ​​​​creating a monument dedicated to the gaining of independence by the United States of America arose shortly after the end of the American Civil War from the Paris-based writer and scholar Edouard de Laboulay, who was a great admirer of the American system of statehood. Frederic Bartholdi, a well-known French sculptor, became interested in this idea. but served as the prototype of the future Statue of Liberty).

In 1870, Bartholdi made the first sketches of the sculpture, combining the images of the ancient Roman goddess of freedom Libertas and one of the symbols of the United States, Colombia. In 1871, the sculptor, with the recommendations of de Laboulet, went to America, and upon arrival in New York, he immediately drew attention to Bedloe Island (as Liberty Island was then called) as the site for the construction of the future monument. During his visit to the United States, Frederick Bartholdi met with many influential Americans (including US President Ulysses Grant) who supported the idea of ​​creating a monument.

In 1875, on the eve of the next year (and timed to coincide with the centennial of the declaration of US independence) World Exhibition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Edouard de Laboulay announced the start of a project to create “Liberty Enlightening the World”. Fundraising for the construction of the monument was started, and it was understood that the sculpture would be a gift to the United States from France, and the pedestal for it would be erected with American money.

In the spring of 1876, Bartholdi again came to the United States as a member of the French delegation at the World Exhibition, and in August a part of the future sculpture was delivered to Philadelphia: the right hand with a torch. The hand of the Statue of Liberty (with a balcony on a torch) was very popular with visitors to the exhibition, after its completion the hand was transported to New York, where the unusual exhibit attracted people and contributed to the growth of the project’s popularity. This fragment later returned to France and was assembled along with the rest of the giant figure.

On March 3, 1877, US President Ulysses Grant, on his last working day at the White House, signed a document agreeing to the United States accepting the Statue of Liberty as a gift from France. The following day, Grant’s successor Rutherford Hayes formally approved Bedloe Island as the site of the monument.

In 1878, the head of the sculpture, completed by that time, was presented to the public at the World Exhibition in Paris. In 1879, Bartholdi engaged Gustave Eiffel, one of the most prominent engineers of his time, who later built the famous tower, to create the interior of the structure. It was Eiffel who designed the supporting structure of the statue (including two spiral staircases leading to the crown), on which the external, “artistic” parts of the sculpture were to be fixed. By that time, Bartholdi had decided to completely assemble the Statue of Liberty in France (thus ensuring the accuracy of its manufacture), then disassemble it for transportation to the United States and mount it again on site.

The completion of the Statue of Liberty was officially announced at a ceremony in Paris on July 4, 1884, the Independence Day of the United States of America. Six months later, the sculpture was dismantled and prepared for transportation to New York.

At the same time, in America, along with supporters of the construction of the monument (which included, in particular, the future US President Theodore Roosevelt), there were also opponents. It was said that the state of American finances is not conducive to such large-scale projects; it was also believed that Americans needed realistic images of the heroes of the recently ended Civil War, and not allegory (which was the Statue of Liberty). Raising the money necessary for the construction of a giant sculpture was also a serious problem, because both the US Congress and the governor of the state of New York refused to allocate the necessary amounts. An outstanding American journalist Joseph Pulitzer, who published the New York World newspaper at that time, played a huge role in organizing the financing of the construction. and promised to publish the names of all people who made even the smallest donation. Pulitzer kept his word and even wrote about “one dollar from the children who collected money for going to the circus” and “sixty cents from a young girl, alone in this world.”

The construction of the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty, which was designed by the famous architect Richard Hunt, began in 1883. The huge structure was erected inside the eleven-pointed star Fort Wood, built on Bedloe Island in the early 19th century. Initially, it was planned to use granite blocks for the construction of the pedestal, but due to lack of funds, preference was given to concrete, and granite was used only for cladding.

On June 17, 1885, the Statue of Liberty, disassembled into parts, was delivered to New York from France. The steamer that brought it was greeted by tens of thousands of people, the arrival of the sculpture in America gave new impetus to fundraising efforts. In April 1886, the pedestal was completed and the assembly of the statue began immediately.

On October 28, 1886, the opening ceremony of the Statue of Liberty was held. The celebration began with a parade that passed through the streets of Manhattan, and from the windows of the New York Stock Exchange, an impromptu serpentine was thrown onto the procession – tapes of telegraph machines that printed stock quotes (it was then that the tradition of “telegraph tape parades” arose in New York). Then officials led by US President Grover Cleveland moved to Bedloe Island, where, after solemn speeches, the French flag covering it was removed from the head of the statue.

The height of the sculpture created by Frederic Bartholdi is 93 meters, and the entire structure with a pedestal is 93 meters. In her right hand, Liberty holds a torch, and in her left – a tablet (tablet), with the date of the declaration of independence by the United States of America written in Roman numerals. At the foot of the statue lies a broken chain.

Very soon, the Statue of Liberty became one of the most famous buildings, “meeting” the numerous immigrants arriving in New York.

In 1903, a bronze plate with the text of Emma Lazarus’ poem “The New Colossus” was installed on the pedestal of the sculpture. The American poetess wrote it in 1883 specifically for sale at a literary auction while raising funds for the construction of the Statue of Liberty. This sonnet conveyed the idea of ​​the monument (and the United States of the time) very well:

“… And give me from the depths of the bottomless
Your outcasts, your downtrodden people,
Send me outcasts, the homeless,
I will light a golden candle for them at the door!”
(translated by V. Lazaris)

It was originally planned to use the Statue of Liberty as a lighthouse, but the lamps mounted in the torch turned out to be very weak and the sculpture never received practical use. Already in 1901, the Statue of Liberty was transferred from the US government unit that managed the lighthouses to the military department, and in 1933 to the US National Park Service.

Twenty years after the construction, the sculpture, the outer part of which was made of copper sheets, was completely covered with patina. There were projects to clean the surface, but in the end it was decided to keep this film of oxides, protecting the statue from further corrosion and giving it its characteristic green color.

During its more than a century of history, the Statue of Liberty has been repaired more than once, the most extensive work was carried out in 1938 and from 1984 to 1986.

There are many replicas of the Statue of Liberty, including in Paris, Frederic Bartholdi’s hometown of Alsatian Colmar, Las Vegas, Japan’s capital Tokyo, and many other places around the world. Only in New York, besides the “original”, smaller replicas of the famous sculpture are installed in the Brooklyn Museum and on Madison Avenue in Manhattan. In the early fifties of the XX century, more than two hundred “Small Sisters of Liberty” were installed throughout America.

In 1924, the Statue of Liberty received the status of a US National Monument. In 1956, Bedloe Island was renamed Liberty Island, and in 1966 it was added to the US National Register of Historic Places. In 1984, the Statue of Liberty was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Now it is one of the most popular tourist sites in New York and one of the most recognizable symbols of the United States of America.