Top Chemistry Schools in Missouri

By | April 29, 2018

If you are going to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry within the state of Missouri, then you have come to the right place. On this website, you will find the 5 best chemistry schools in Missouri. Please note that these rankings are based on student reviews, graduation rates, and the academic surveys submitted by peer colleges and universities throughout Missouri.

  • TRANSPORTHINT: Basic information, such as location, land area, population, capital and nickname of Missouri. Also includes industry, economy, climate, geography and history of Missouri.

Top Chemistry Schools in Missouri

Ranking Graduate Chemistry
1 Washington University in St. Louis
Department of Chemistry

Address: Campus Box 1134, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899
Phone: (314) 935-6530
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chemistry.wustl.edu
2 University of Missouri
Department of Chemistry

Address: 125 Chemistry Building, Columbia, MO 65211-7600
Phone: (573) 882-8374
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://chemistry.missouri.edu
3 University of Missouri–St. Louis
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Address: 315 Benton Hall, St. Louis, MO 63121-4400
Phone: (314) 516-5311
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.umsl.edu
4 Missouri University of Science & Technology
Department of Chemistry

Address: 142 Schrenk Hall, Rolla, MO 65409
Phone: (573) 341-4420
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://chem.mst.edu
5 University of Missouri–Kansas City
Department of Chemistry

Address: 5100 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110
Phone: (816) 235-2272
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://cas.umkc.edu

Best Chemistry Colleges in Missouri

History of Missouri

As archaeological research shows, already about seven thousand years ago, the indigenous residents of America, the Indians, lived on the territory of the modern state of Missouri . Approximately three thousand years ago, settlements of the Indians of the Mississippi culture appeared on the lands of Missouri, known for their developed social and political system, as well as numerous mounds that had religious significance for the Indians.

One of the largest regional centers of the Mississippian Indian culture, which spread from the Great Lakes to the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, was located in the region of the second most populous city ​​of Missouri – St. Louis, one of the nicknames of which is “Mound City”.

The first Europeans to visit Missouri were the Frenchmen Jacques Marquette and Louis Jollier in 1673 during their journey along the great Mississip River. Following them, in 1681-82, the famous pioneer Rene de La Salle descended down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico, declaring the lands explored by him the property of France and calling them “Louisiana”.

In subsequent decades, the French successfully mastered the northern (Wisconsin and Michigan) and southern (Alabama and Mississippi) regions of their huge American colony, while the central region, including Missouri, remained undeveloped for a long time. In 1700, on the site of modern St. Louis, the Jesuit Pierre Mare tried to establish a Catholic mission, but under pressure from hostile Indians, three years later he was forced to leave Missouri and move to Illinois. In 1723, the French built Fort Orleans on the Missouri River, the first fortified European settlement on the lands of the state, but three years later the fort was abandoned.

In 1735, Sainte-Genevieve, the oldest city in Missouri and one of the oldest cities in the United States west of the Mississippi River, was founded. The main occupation of its residents was agriculture; wheat, corn and tobacco were grown here. In addition, even then, minerals were mined in Missouri, in particular lead and salt.

As a result of the defeat in the French and Indian War, France lost part of its colonies in America, primarily Canada, but nevertheless retained the lands west of the Mississippi, including Missouri. At the same time, the French, in an effort to gain allies, concluded a secret treaty with Spain in 1762, transferring the lands of Louisiana to her. But the decisions of European politicians reached distant America very late, and only in 1766 the first Spanish governor arrived in the colony of Louisiana.

By this time there were two townships in Missouri: St. Genevieve and St. Louis, founded in 1764. It was around them that the fur trade was concentrated, actively bought by Europeans from the Indians. The influence of the British was very strong in the region, so the Spanish officials who ruled Missouri encouraged the French settlers in every possible way, and with the beginning of the revolution in the USA, the American rebels.

In 1779, Spain declared war on England, and on May 26, 1780, a detachment of British-allied Indian tribes led by English officers tried to capture St. Louis, but was defeated. This episode of the American Revolutionary War is known as the “Battle of St. Louis”.

In the late eighties – early nineties of the XVIII century, the number of American immigrants in Missouri increased sharply. The Spanish authorities sought to maintain their influence in the region; in 1789, a new Spanish colony of New Madrid, to some extent independent of Louisiana, was even created in the southeast of Missouri. But, nevertheless, most of the Americans who came from the east did not show much loyalty to Spain and did not seek to convert to Catholicism.

In 1796, Spain, which entered the war with England and did not have enough regular military units to protect all its colonies, announced the free distribution of land in Missouri to those wishing to settle here and the abolition of taxes. A new wave of settlers poured in from the east, among which was the famous pioneer, the hero of American folklore, Daniel Boone. By the early 19th century, the majority of the region’s residents were Americans, with about a fifth of Missouri’s population being black slaves.

In 1800, Louisiana again formally became French, and three years later, in 1803, the United States of America bought this vast territory from France. In 1805, the United States Congress decided to create the Louisiana Territory, which included the lands located west of the Mississippi River and north of the modern state of Louisiana. Saint Louis became the capital of the new US territory.

Missouri was often referred to as the “Gateway to the West” in the early 19th century. It was from here, from the city of St. Charles, that the famous expedition of Lewis and Clark, organized by US President Thomas Jefferson, set off in 1804, exploring the northwest of the United States up to the Pacific coast. In 1806, the expedition of Zebulon Pike set off from St. Louis, exploring the west of the Great Plains and the Rocky Mountains in the area of the modern state of Colorado. Over the next few decades, St. Louis and Missouri continued to be the starting point for most settlers to the US West.