Top Chemistry Schools in Indiana

By | April 29, 2018

If you are going to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry within the state of Indiana, then you have come to the right place. On this website, you will find the 3 best chemistry schools in Indiana. Please note that these rankings are based on student reviews, graduation rates, and the academic surveys submitted by peer colleges and universities throughout Indiana.

  • TRANSPORTHINT: Basic information, such as location, land area, population, capital and nickname of Indiana. Also includes industry, economy, climate, geography and history of Indiana.

Top Chemistry Schools in Indiana

Ranking Graduate Chemistry
1 Purdue University–West Lafayette
Department of Chemistry

Address: 560 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2084
Phone: (765) 494-5200
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chem.purdue.edu
2 Indiana University–Bloomington
Department of Chemistry

Address: Chemistry Building Room C121, Bloomington, IN 47405-7102
Phone: (812) 855-2069
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://chem.indiana.edu
3 University of Notre Dame
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Address: 251 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670
Phone: (574) 631-7058
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.chemistry.nd.edu

Best Chemistry Colleges in Indiana

Early History of Indiana

Despite the fact that France, which lost the war, was forced to accept the loss of its colonies in North America, the numerous Indian peoples who lived in the Midwest and in the Great Lakes region continued to oppose the British. The Indians, dissatisfied with the policy pursued by the British, united under the leadership of the leader of the Ottawa people, Pontiac, and in the mid-sixties of the 18th century actively resisted the Europeans, in particular, in Indiana, the rebels captured the forts of Miami and Kvateno. The “Pontiac War” ended only in 1766, and the British were forced to significantly limit the resettlement of Europeans to the lands of the Indians. These restrictions, in turn, caused discontent among the American colonists and subsequently served as one of the causes of the American Revolution.

In 1774, the British Parliament passed an act creating the province of Quebec, which included, among other things, the lands of the modern states of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and part of Minnesota. Virginia, Connecticut, New York and Pennsylvania claimed the lands east of the Appalachians, so the passage of this law was another reason for the discontent of the residents of the “thirteen colonies”.

During the years of the American Revolutionary War, American militias from Kentucky successfully operated in Indiana under the leadership of George Clark, the future brigadier general of the US Army and the founder of the largest city of the Bluegrass State – Louisville. In 1778, Clark organized an armed expedition north of the Ohio River and captured several British outposts in Indiana and Illinois. He met with no resistance, as neither the Indians nor the French-speaking settlers wanted to fight for British interests. To fight Clark’s militia, the British lieutenant governor of Quebec, Henry Hamilton, with a small detachment, left Detroit for Michigan. and fortified at Fort Vincennes in southwestern Indiana. In February 1779, George Clark crossed the Wabash, captured Fort Vincennes and captured the British, led by Hamilton.

The successful actions of George Clark not only secured the lands of the “Old Northwest” for the United States, as the “American” part of the British province of Quebec was called, but also helped the future first US President George Washington enlist the support of France in the war of independence.

In the years 1785 – 1795 in the Great Lakes region, including Indiana, a series of armed clashes took place between the Americans and the confederacy of Indian tribes, known as the “Northwest Indian War” (or the “Little Turtle War” after one of the leaders of the Indians ). In 1790, George Washington sent army units to protect the settlers, but the Indians continued to fight successfully and the American troops suffered heavy losses. Only in 1795 was peace concluded and the Indians recognized the authority of the US government.