Top BBA Schools in Virginia

By | April 27, 2018

We have found 12 undergraduate business schools in Virginia that offer full-time BBA programs leading to a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Check the following list to see acceptance rate, in-state and out-of-state tuition as well as total enrollment for each of Virginia BBA colleges.

  • CAMPINGSHIP: Historical and genealogical overview of state Virginia. Includes population and religion as well as landmarks and major counties in Virginia.

List of Best Undergraduate Business Schools in Virginia

Rank Undergraduate Business Schools
1 University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22904
In-State Tuition: $10,628
Out-of-State Tuition: $33,574
Application Deadline: Jan 1
Acceptance Rate: 32.1%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 15,476University of Virginia Undergraduate Business
2 College of William and Mary
PO Box 8795 Williamsburg, VA 23187
In-State Tuition: $12,188
Out-of-State Tuition: $33,212
Application Deadline: Jan 1
Acceptance Rate: 33.5%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 5,836College of William and Mary Undergraduate Business
3 Virginia Tech
Blacksburg, VA 24061
In-State Tuition: $9,954
Out-of-State Tuition: $26,404
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 66.7
School Setting: rural
Total Enrollment: 23,558Virginia Tech Undergraduate Business
4 University of Richmond
28 Westhampton Way Univ. of Richmond, VA 23173
In-State Tuition: $41,610
Out-of-State Tuition: $41,610
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 39.2%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 2,925
5 Brandeis University
415 South Street Waltham, MA 02454
In-State Tuition: $40,274
Out-of-State Tuition: $40,274
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 40.4%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 3,317
6 George Mason University
4400 University Drive Fairfax, VA 22030
In-State Tuition: $8,684
Out-of-State Tuition: $25,448
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 63.3%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 19,702
7 James Madison University
800 S. Main Street Harrisonburg, VA 22807
In-State Tuition: $7,860
Out-of-State Tuition: $20,624
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 61.4%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 17,281
8 Washington and Lee University
204 W. Washington Street Lexington, VA 24450
In-State Tuition: $40,387
Out-of-State Tuition: $40,387
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 19.0%
School Setting: rural
Total Enrollment: 1,759
9 Virginia Commonwealth University
Box 842527 Richmond, VA 23284
In-State Tuition: N/A
Out-of-State Tuition: N/A
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 59.4%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 23,149
10 Old Dominion University
5115 Hampton Boulevard Norfolk, VA 23529
In-State Tuition: $7,708
Out-of-State Tuition: $21,148
Application Deadline: Feb 1
Acceptance Rate: 72.1%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 18,253
11 Virginia Military Institute
VMI Parade Lexington, VA 24450
In-State Tuition: $12,328
Out-of-State Tuition: $30,320
Application Deadline: Feb 1
Acceptance Rate: 55.6%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 1,500
12 Radford University
PO Box 6890 Radford, VA 24142
In-State Tuition: $8,104
Out-of-State Tuition: $18,428
Application Deadline: N/A
Acceptance Rate: 71.1%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 7,773

History of the State of Virginia – Mother of Presidents

From 1801 to 1825, three natives of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe, were elected one after another to the post of President of the United States. Considering that the first President of the United States of America, George Washington, was also a Virginian, there were jokes in the USA about a kind of “Virginian dynasty”. Later, four more people from the “Old Dominion” (William Harrison, John Tyler, Zachary Taylor and Woodrow Wilson) became the head of the US government, thanks to which the state received the nickname “Mother of Presidents”.

In the early decades of the 19th century , Virginia’s economy expanded rapidly. Industry developed in the state, including shipbuilding on the Atlantic coast and iron and steel in the mountainous regions to the west. At the same time, due to the use of slaves rather than hired workers in the factories, labor productivity was very low and the industry of Virginia could not adequately compete with the steel mills of New Jersey, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Infrastructure also developed in Virginia, in the first half of the “century of steam” several canals and roads that were very important for the state were built here. In 1831, coal began to be transported along the first horse-drawn railroad in Virginia, and already in 1834, the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac railroad began operating, connecting the capital of Virginia with the capital of the United States.

In 1846, the US Congress agreed to return to the state of Virginia the lands located south of the Potomac River in the area of ​​​​the city of Alexandria and previously transferred to the federal government to create the metropolitan District of Columbia.

Although the number of free blacks in the state gradually grew, by 1860 almost half a million people (about a third of the total population of Virginia at that time) were slaves. The economic well-being of Virginia, and especially its eastern districts, was also based on the use of slave labor on plantations.

Slave uprisings broke out in the Commonwealth, the most famous of which was organized in 1831 by Nat Turner. Then the rebellious black slaves killed about sixty whites, but the uprising was quickly and brutally suppressed. About fifty rebels were executed by court order, and more than a hundred were killed by soldiers and militias. After the Turner uprising in Virginia, laws were passed prohibiting the teaching of blacks (including free ones) to read and write, as well as restricting their holding religious meetings.

In 1859, one of the most famous abolitionists in the United States (supporters of the emancipation of slaves), John Brown, who had previously opposed slave owners with weapons in his hands in Kansas, organized an attack on the federal arsenal in Harpers Ferry (this city is located in modern West Virginia). Brown planned to seize the rifles and organize an armed uprising of slaves in Virginia.