Top BBA Schools in Vermont

By | April 27, 2018

We have found 1 undergraduate business schools in Vermont that offer full-time BBA programs leading to a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Check the following list to see acceptance rate, in-state and out-of-state tuition as well as total enrollment for each of Vermont BBA colleges.

  • CAMPINGSHIP: Historical and genealogical overview of state Vermont. Includes population and religion as well as landmarks and major counties in Vermont.

List of Best Undergraduate Business Schools in Vermont

Rank Undergraduate Business Schools
1 University of Vermont
194 S. Prospect Street Burlington, VT 05405
In-State Tuition: $14,132
Out-of-State Tuition: $32,840
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 70.9%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 11,382University of Vermont Undergraduate Business

Recent History of Vermont

The growth of cities in the Northeastern United States, primarily Boston and New York City, provided markets for Vermont’s agricultural products. In the twenties and thirties of the XIX century, when farmers could no longer compete with suppliers of cheaper grain and meat from the western regions, sheep breeding and wool production began to develop in the Green Mountain State (in 1837, there were more than a million sheep in Vermont).

In 1848, the first railroad was built in Vermont.

During the American Civil War, more than 28,000 Vermonters fought in the northern army. The state formed seventeen infantry regiments, one cavalry regiment, several artillery batteries, and other units.

Only one episode of the Civil War took place directly in Vermont, known as the St. Albans Raid. Its organizer was a soldier of the Confederate army Bennett Young, who was captured by the northerners in the summer of 1863, but managed to escape to Canada. In order to divert Union military units to guard the northern border, as well as to replenish the treasury of the southerners, Young decided to rob a bank in Vermont.

On October 10, 1864, Bennett Young arrived with two accomplices in the city of St. Albans in northwestern Vermont. Over the next few days, the remaining participants in the operation arrived in the city in groups of two or three people. Finally, on October 19, twenty-one “saboteurs” simultaneously attacked three city banks, seizing more than $200,000. During the robbery, one citizen was killed and one was injured, the raiders tried to set fire to the city, but, fortunately, only one barn burned down.