Top BBA Schools in Tennessee

By | April 27, 2018

We have found 8 undergraduate business schools in Tennessee that offer full-time BBA programs leading to a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Check the following list to see acceptance rate, in-state and out-of-state tuition as well as total enrollment for each of Tennessee BBA colleges.

  • CAMPINGSHIP: Historical and genealogical overview of state Tennessee. Includes population and religion as well as landmarks and major counties in Tennessee.

List of Best Undergraduate Business Schools in Tennessee

Rank Undergraduate Business Schools
1 University of Tennessee
527 Andy Holt Tower Knoxville, TN 37996
In-State Tuition: $6,850
Out-of-State Tuition: $20,646
Application Deadline: Dec 1
Acceptance Rate: 72.7%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 21,182University of Tennessee Undergraduate Business
2 University of Memphis
Memphis, TN 38152
In-State Tuition: $6,990
Out-of-State Tuition: $20,856
Application Deadline: Jul 1
Acceptance Rate: 61.0%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 16,717University of Memphis Undergraduate Business
3 University of Tennessee-Chattanooga
615 McCallie Avenue Chattanooga, TN 37403
In-State Tuition: $6,062
Out-of-State Tuition: $18,376
Application Deadline: Aug 1
Acceptance Rate: 79.1%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 9,039University of Tennessee-Chattanooga Undergraduate Business
4 Belmont University
1900 Belmont Boulevard Nashville, TN 37212
In-State Tuition: $23,680
Out-of-State Tuition: $23,680
Application Deadline: Aug 1
Acceptance Rate: 76.6%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 4,378
5 East Tennessee State University
807 University Parkway Johnson City, TN 37614
In-State Tuition: $6,884
Out-of-State Tuition: $19,808
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 85.2%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 11,648
6 Middle Tennessee State University
1301 E. Main Street, CAB Room 205 Murfreesboro, TN 37132
In-State Tuition: $7,890
Out-of-State Tuition: $23,550
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 70.2%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 22,299
7 Tennessee Technological University
Campus Box 5006 USPS 077-460 Cookeville, TN 38505
In-State Tuition: $5,800
Out-of-State Tuition: $17,980
Application Deadline: Aug 1
Acceptance Rate: 84.4%
School Setting: rural
Total Enrollment: 8,918
8 University of Tennessee-Martin
University Street Martin, TN 38238
In-State Tuition: $6,034
Out-of-State Tuition: $18,104
Application Deadline: Aug 1
Acceptance Rate: 74.5%
School Setting: rural
Total Enrollment: 7,586

Modern History of Tennessee

From 1776 until the mid-nineties of the 18th century in Tennessee (as well as in neighboring Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia), clashes and conflicts between European settlers and Indians (mainly the Cherokee people), known as the “Chickamoga Wars”, continued. Despite numerous treaties that left the Native Americans the right to live on their lands, the colonists constantly expanded the boundaries of the settled territories, gradually pushing the Indians further and further west. Only in 1794 did the Cherokee, recognizing the military superiority of the American army, cease resistance.

The Cherokee, Muscogee, Chickasaw, and Choctaw who lived in Tennessee were among the Five Civilized Tribes. They adopted Christianity, adopted many of the customs of their “pale-faced” neighbors, and created schools for their children. The Cherokee even had their own alphabet and published a newspaper. However, the desire to seize new territories from the residents of the states of the US South led to the adoption by the US Congress in 1830 of the “Indian Removal Act”. At the end of the thirties of the XIX century, the Indians were forcibly relocated to reservations in the territory of the modern state of Oklahoma. Thousands of them died on the long road west through Kentucky, Missouri and Arkansas, called the “Road of Tears” by the Indians.

In the early decades of Tennessee settlement, there were relatively few slaves in the state (about four thousand at the beginning of the 19th century), most of them worked on cattle farms in Central Tennessee, where natural conditions (very similar to the Bluegrass region in neighboring Kentucky) were perfect for raising large cattle and horses. With the development of West Tennessee, especially the fertile lands of the Mississippi Valley , excellent for growing cotton, the number of disenfranchised black workers also increased dramatically. Already in 1830, there were almost one hundred and fifty thousand slaves in the state, and by the beginning of the American Civil War, they made up a quarter of the population of Tennessee (more than 280,000 people).