Top BBA Schools in Illinois

By | April 27, 2018

We have found 12 undergraduate business schools in Illinois that offer full-time BBA programs leading to a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Check the following list to see acceptance rate, in-state and out-of-state tuition as well as total enrollment for each of Illinois BBA colleges.

  • CAMPINGSHIP: Historical and genealogical overview of state Illinois. Includes population and religion as well as landmarks and major counties in Illinois.

List of Best Undergraduate Business Schools in Illinois

Rank Undergraduate Business Schools
1 University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign
601 E. John Street Champaign, IL 61820
In-State Tuition: $13,640
Out-of-State Tuition: $27,782
Application Deadline: Jan 2
Acceptance Rate: 65.2%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 31,477University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign Undergraduate Business
2 DePaul University
1 E. Jackson Boulevard Chicago, IL 60604
In-State Tuition: $28,858
Out-of-State Tuition: $28,858
Application Deadline: Feb 1
Acceptance Rate: 74.2%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 16,199DePaul University Undergraduate Business
3 Loyola University Chicago
1032 W. Sheridan Road Chicago, IL 60660
In-State Tuition: $32,114
Out-of-State Tuition: $32,114
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 78.1%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 10,077Loyola University Chicago Undergraduate Business
4 University of Illinois-Chicago
601 S. Morgan M/C 102 Chicago, IL 60607
In-State Tuition: $13,074
Out-of-State Tuition: $25,464
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 63.0%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 16,044
5 Northern Illinois University
PO Box 3001 DeKalb, IL 60115
In-State Tuition: $12,126
Out-of-State Tuition: $20,646
Application Deadline: Aug 1
Acceptance Rate: 58.5%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 18,277
6 Southern Illinois University-Carbondale
Carbondale, IL 62901
In-State Tuition: $10,468
Out-of-State Tuition: $21,403
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 68.6%
School Setting: rural
Total Enrollment: 15,551
7 Bradley University
1501 W. Bradley Avenue Peoria, IL 61625
In-State Tuition: $25,424
Out-of-State Tuition: $25,424
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 73.5%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 5,061
8 Illinois State University
Campus Box 2200 Normal, IL 61790
In-State Tuition: $11,077
Out-of-State Tuition: $17,617
Application Deadline: Mar 1
Acceptance Rate: 61.7%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 18,389
9 Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville
Box 1600 Edwardsville, IL 62026
In-State Tuition: $8,401
Out-of-State Tuition: $8,401
Application Deadline: May 1
Acceptance Rate: 87.4%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 11,144
10 University of Illinois-Springfield
1 University Plaza Springfield, IL 62703
In-State Tuition: $9,815
Out-of-State Tuition: $18,965
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 57.6%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 3,027
11 Eastern Illinois University
600 Lincoln Avenue Charleston, IL 61920
In-State Tuition: $9,302
Out-of-State Tuition: $24,542
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 68.4%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 10,225
12 Western Illinois University
1 University Circle Macomb, IL 61455
In-State Tuition: $9,466
Out-of-State Tuition: $12,855
Application Deadline: May 15
Acceptance Rate: 63.6%
School Setting: rural
Total Enrollment: 10,553

Modern History of Illinois

After the death of Joseph Smith, conflicts between Mormons and adherents of other religions in Illinois did not stop. During the period from 1844 to 1846, known as the “Illinois Mormon War”, active agitation continued in the state to expel the Mormons. In early 1846, Mormons living in Nauvoo left the city and traveled west to Utah.

Since its founding, Illinois has remained a “free” state, in which slavery was legally prohibited, although in fact a number of black slaves lived on the estates of wealthy landowners (mainly in the south of the state, in the region known as “Little Egypt”). In Illinois, the political career of one of the most famous anti-slavery fighters and the sixteenth President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, began. A native of Kentucky, Lincoln moved with his family to Illinois in 1830. Young Abraham Lincoln served in the militia during the Black Hawk War, became a member of the state legislature in 1834, and was elected from Illinois to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1847.

In 1848, the construction of a canal was completed that connected the Chicago and Illinois rivers (and through them – Lake Michigan and Mississippi) and created a convenient water route from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. In the same year, the first railroad in the state was built. Illinois, and first of all Chicago, became the most important transport “crossroads” of America. The economy of Illinois developed rapidly, new plants and factories were opened in the state, in 1848 the Chicago Chamber of Commerce began to operate – one of the oldest exchanges in the world.

During the years of the American Civil War, more than two hundred and fifty thousand residents of the state fought in the army of the northerners (only the states of New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio gave more soldiers to the Union). One hundred and fifty infantry, seventeen cavalry, and two artillery regiments were formed in Illinois. In addition, “Lincoln Land”, as Illinois is sometimes called, played an important role in supplying the army. At the same time, there was a fairly strong opposition group among the politicians of the state (known as the Copperheads – “Copper Heads”), who advocated the cessation of hostilities and the conclusion of peace with the Confederation.

In the last decades of the 19th century, the “Prairie State” developed rapidly. The population of Illinois increased dramatically, mainly due to immigrants from Europe and the United States Northeast. Chicago became the largest city in the Midwest and the second most populated in the United States of America. In 1871, a significant part of the “City of the Winds” was damaged by the “Great Chicago Fire”, about three hundred people died and more than eighteen thousand buildings were destroyed. Nevertheless, after this terrible catastrophe, one of the largest in US history, the city rebuilt very quickly (moreover, stone buildings predominated, not wooden ones, as before the fire) and continued to grow.