Top BBA Schools in Connecticut

By | April 27, 2018

We have found 5 undergraduate business schools in Connecticut that offer full-time BBA programs leading to a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Check the following list to see acceptance rate, in-state and out-of-state tuition as well as total enrollment for each of Connecticut BBA colleges.

  • CAMPINGSHIP: Historical and genealogical overview of state Connecticut. Includes population and religion as well as landmarks and major counties in Connecticut.

List of Best Undergraduate Business Schools in Connecticut

Rank Undergraduate Business Schools
1 University of Connecticut
2131 Hillside Road, Unit 3088 Storrs, CT 06269
In-State Tuition: $10,416
Out-of-State Tuition: $26,880
Application Deadline: Feb 1
Acceptance Rate: 49.7%
School Setting: rural
Total Enrollment: 17,008University of Connecticut Undergraduate Business
2 United States Coast Guard Academy
15 Mohegan Avenue New London, CT 06320
In-State Tuition: $0
Out-of-State Tuition: $0
Application Deadline: Feb 1
Acceptance Rate: 24.6%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 973United States Coast Guard Academy Undergraduate Business
3 Fairfield University
1073 N. Benson Road Fairfield, CT 06824
In-State Tuition: $39,040
Out-of-State Tuition: $39,040
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 64.7%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 3,886Fairfield University Undergraduate Business
4 Quinnipiac University
275 Mount Carmel Avenue Hamden, CT 06518
In-State Tuition: $34,250
Out-of-State Tuition: $34,250
Application Deadline: Feb 1
Acceptance Rate: 60.2%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 5,971
5 University of Hartford
200 Bloomfield Avenue West Hartford, CT 06117
In-State Tuition: $29,852
Out-of-State Tuition: $29,852
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 68.4%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 5,516

Early History of Connecticut

On the territory of the modern state of Connecticut, by the time the first European colonists appeared, the Indians of the Algonquian people, the Mohegans, lived. At the beginning of the 17th century, the Pequot Indians broke away from the Mohegan and occupied a dominant position.

In 1611 – 1614, the coast of Connecticut (as well as New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island and Massachusetts) was studied by the Dutch navigator Adrian Block. He was also the first European to explore Long Island Bay and climb up the Connecticut River.

In 1623, the Dutch West India Company established a trading post in Connecticut, and ten years later, in 1633, strengthened it by building Fort Hope (“Fort of Hope”). In 1654, with the increasing influence of the English colonists in the region, the Dutch abandoned the fort.

The first English people arrived in Connecticut from the Massachusetts Bay Colony (Boston) and Plymouth Colony. In 1633, the first English trading post was built, and in 1635, the colony of Saybrook was founded at the mouth of the Connecticut River. In 1636, the Connecticut Colony (also known as the “River Colony”) was established on the site of present-day Hartford. In 1637, the New Haven Colony was founded on the coast.

Almost immediately, the English colonists began to have conflicts with the Pequot Indians, who traded with the Dutch. Armed clashes escalated into the “Pekote War” (1634 – 1638), which resulted in the victory of the Europeans and the almost complete destruction of the Pekot people.

In January 1639, the council of the Connecticut colony approved a document that went down in history as the “Basic Charter” and determined the structure and powers of the government of the colony, as well as the procedure for holding elections. The Basic Charter of Connecticut was the first such document in the American colonies and later became the prototype of the US Constitution. It was from the Basic Charter that Connecticut got its famous nickname, the “State of the Constitution.”