Top BBA Schools in California

By | April 27, 2018

We have found 25 undergraduate business schools in California that offer full-time BBA programs leading to a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Check the following list to see acceptance rate, in-state and out-of-state tuition as well as total enrollment for each of California BBA colleges.

  • CAMPINGSHIP: Historical and genealogical overview of state California. Includes population and religion as well as landmarks and major counties in California.

List of Best Undergraduate Business Schools in California

Rank Undergraduate Business Schools
1 University of California-Berkeley
110 Sproul Hall Berkeley, CA 94720
In-State Tuition: $10,868
Out-of-State Tuition: $33,747
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 21.6%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 25,530University of California-Berkeley Undergraduate Business
2 University of Southern California
University Park Los Angeles, CA 90089
In-State Tuition: $41,022
Out-of-State Tuition: $41,022
Application Deadline: Jan 10
Acceptance Rate: 24.4%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 16,751University of Southern California Undergraduate Business
3 Pepperdine University
24255 Pacific Coast Highway Malibu, CA 90263
In-State Tuition: $39,080
Out-of-State Tuition: $39,080
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 41.3%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 3,439Pepperdine University Undergraduate Business
4 Santa Clara University
500 El Camino Real Santa Clara, CA 95053
In-State Tuition: $37,368
Out-of-State Tuition: $37,368
Application Deadline: Jan
Acceptance Rate: 59.2%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 5,200
5 University of California-Riverside
900 University Avenue Riverside, CA 92521
In-State Tuition: $11,022
Out-of-State Tuition: $33,901
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 78.1%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 16,996
6 University of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park San Diego, CA 92110
In-State Tuition: $37,378
Out-of-State Tuition: $37,378
Application Deadline: Mar 1
Acceptance Rate: 49.4%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 5,111
7 Loyola Marymount University
1 LMU Drive Los Angeles, CA 90045
In-State Tuition: $36,404
Out-of-State Tuition: $36,404
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 59.2%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 5,833
8 San Diego State University
5500 Campanile Drive San Diego, CA 92182
In-State Tuition: $4,992
Out-of-State Tuition: $16,152
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 36.4%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 27,537
9 University of San Francisco
Ignatian Heights San Francisco, CA 94117
In-State Tuition: $36,380
Out-of-State Tuition: $36,380
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 71.3%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 5,525
10 California State University-Los Angeles
5151 State University Drive Los Angeles, CA 90032
In-State Tuition: $4,701
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,861
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 68.0%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 15,734
11 California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo
1 Grand Avenue San Luis Obispo, CA 93407
In-State Tuition: $6,498
Out-of-State Tuition: $13,938
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 37.3%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 18,302
12 California State University-Fullerton
800 N. State College Boulevard Fullerton, CA 92834
In-State Tuition: $4,662
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,822
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 55.1%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 30,737
13 San Jose State University
1 Washington Square San Jose, CA 95192
In-State Tuition: $6,250
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,178
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 74.4%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 24,273
14 San Francisco State University
1600 Holloway Avenue San Francisco, CA 94132
In-State Tuition: $5,014
Out-of-State Tuition: $16,174
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 72.5%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 25,001
15 California State Polytechnic University-Pomona
3801 W. Temple Avenue Pomona, CA 91768
In-State Tuition: $4,551
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,711
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 61.3%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 20,136
16 California State University-Long Beach
1250 Bellflower Boulevard Long Beach, CA 90840
In-State Tuition: $4,606
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,766
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 31.8%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 29,226
17 California State University-Chico
400 W. First Street Chico, CA 95929
In-State Tuition: $6,296
Out-of-State Tuition: $17,456
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 87.7%
School Setting: rural
Total Enrollment: 15,617
18 California State University-Fresno
5150 N. Maple Fresno, CA 93740
In-State Tuition: $4,672
Out-of-State Tuition: $15,832
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 71.9%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 18,216
19 California State University-Northridge
18111 Nordhoff Street Northridge, CA 91330
In-State Tuition: $3,702
Out-of-State Tuition: $18,888
Application Deadline: Nov 30
Acceptance Rate: 72.5%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 29,275
20 California State University-Sacramento
6000 J Street Sacramento, CA 95819
In-State Tuition: $5,194
Out-of-State Tuition: $16,354
Application Deadline: Mar 1
Acceptance Rate: 80.0%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 24,388
21 Chapman University
1 University Drive Orange, CA 92866
In-State Tuition: $38,524
Out-of-State Tuition: $38,524
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 56.3%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 4,476
22 University of the Pacific
3601 Pacific Avenue Stockton, CA 95211
In-State Tuition: $34,100
Out-of-State Tuition: $34,100
Application Deadline: Jan 15
Acceptance Rate: 41.5%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 3,501
23 California State University-Bakersfield
9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, CA 93311
In-State Tuition: $4,383
Out-of-State Tuition: $11,199
Application Deadline: Mar 1
Acceptance Rate: 69.6%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 6,494
24 California State University-San Bernardino
5500 University Parkway San Bernardino, CA 92407
In-State Tuition: $4,026
Out-of-State Tuition: $12,954
Application Deadline: rolling admission
Acceptance Rate: 64.2%
School Setting: urban
Total Enrollment: 14,416
25 Sonoma State University
1801 E. Cotati Avenue Rohnert Park, CA 94928
In-State Tuition: $5,302
Out-of-State Tuition: $14,230
Application Deadline: Dec 31
Acceptance Rate: 77.3%
School Setting: suburban
Total Enrollment: 7,483

History of California

Even before the decision on the statehood of California, the states of the slave-owning South of the United States lobbied for the issue of giving Southern California independence, moreover, as a state with legalized slavery. Nevertheless, as a result of the adoption by the US Congress of a package of laws known as the “Compromise of 1850”, California became part of the US “free” state.

During the American Civil War, California sided with the northerners. Far from the theater of operations, California did not form regular military units, but many of the state’s residents participated in the war voluntarily.

With the outbreak of war in Southern California, separatist sentiments again escalated, rallies and demonstrations took place, often under the “bear” flag of the California Republic. To suppress such performances, units of the federal cavalry were brought into Los Angeles, which were later replaced by volunteer units formed in Northern California.

After the end of the Civil War , California’s economy continued to grow rapidly. In 1869, the first transcontinental railroad in the US was completed, running from Iowa through Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, and Nevada, connecting California to the US Midwest. Now it was possible to get from Chicago to San Francisco in six days, and not in six months by sea, as before. The railroad dramatically increased the flow of immigrants to California on the one hand and ensured the delivery of products manufactured in the state to the east on the other.

In the 1970s, new varieties of oranges were bred, and the mild climate of California made it possible to grow citrus fruits all year round. Perishable fruits in special ventilated wagons were sent to the major cities of the east coast. It was then that oranges in the United States ceased to be exotic and became affordable and widespread.

In the second half of the 19th century, a large number of immigrants from China was considered a serious problem in California. As a rule, the Chinese were willing to work for less pay than the whites, which caused conflicts and constant tension. Several laws have been passed by the state legislature and the US government to limit Chinese immigration, land ownership and employment opportunities for Asians. Some of these laws, the only ones in the history of the United States restricting the rights of a certain ethnic group, were in effect until the middle of the 20th century.

Back in the middle of the 19th century, oil was found in California. The first wells were drilled in the 1860s, and the state experienced an oil boom in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. California then became the largest oil producer in the US, “black gold” was the state’s main export product. Oil production remains an important branch of California ‘s economy today.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, a serious problem for California was the lack of water. In 1913, the construction of an aqueduct (water conduit) was completed, delivering water from the Owens Valley in the Sierra Nevada mountains to Los Angeles. But due to the withdrawal of large amounts of water, many farms in the Owens Valley have suffered, leading to unrest and even sabotage. The situation was complicated by the behind-the-scenes actions of corrupt politicians. As a result, agriculture in the Owens Valley practically disappeared, and the Los Angeles area received the water it needed. This conflict went down in history as the California Water Wars.

Of great importance to California (as well as neighboring Nevada and Arizona) was the construction of the famous Hoover Dam on the Colorado River and the accompanying system of irrigation canals that brought water to the Imperial and Coachella valleys in southern California. More recently, the Shasta Dam on the Sacramento River, the California Aqueduct, the Central Valley Project, and many other waterworks have been built to provide water to the state’s rich farmlands and the state’s rapidly growing cities.

Another impetus to the economy of California was given by the completion of the construction of the first transcontinental highway in the United States – the Lincoln Highway. In 1913, she connected New York and San Francisco, passing through the states of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and California. This road, the length of which exceeds five thousand kilometers, was called the “Main Street of America.”

In 1926, another major highway was built – the famous Highway 66, connecting California with the Midwest of the United States.

In the first quarter of the last century, the largest US film companies concentrated in California, namely in the Los Angeles area, and most of the studios were built in the Hollywood area (the first of them, Nestor Studios, in 1911). Filmmakers were attracted by the mild climate with plenty of sunny days (good lighting was a big problem when shooting movies in those years), as well as the picturesque and varied nature of California.

In 1923, to advertise a new residential area in the Hollywood Hills, a sign “Hollywoodland” was built from fifteen-meter letters . Now, reduced to the more familiar to us “Hollywood”, it is a symbol and “calling card” of US cinema.

Later in California, the entertainment industry continued to develop successfully, it is here that many major US radio and television companies are headquartered.

During World War II, California played a huge role in supporting the US Army and Navy. Naval shipyards were reconstructed and built in San Diego, Long Beach and San Francisco. In San Francisco, among other things, ships of the famous Liberty series were built, which delivered Lend-Lease supplies to the Soviet Union.

Southern California was already becoming one of the most important centers of the aviation (and later aerospace) industry in the United States. Several large aircraft factories operated here, including Douglas Aircraft (in Santa Monica, El Segundo, Long Beach, and Torrance) and Hughes Aircraft (in Culver City). In addition, several air bases and training camps were established in the south of the state, where military pilots were trained.

In the post-war decades, thanks to the “baby boom” and immigration from other states of the United States, the population of California grew rapidly, reaching almost twenty million people by 1970.

In the Stanford University area, new electronics, semiconductor and information technology companies grew one after another – Silicon Valley was born.

It was in California in the sixties of the XX century that the hippie movement was born. The youth of the “rock and roll generation”, who did not want to fight in Vietnam, gladly accepted the ideas of the “flower children”. In San Francisco, in the Haight-Ashbury area, one of the most famous hippie communities was formed. In the summer of 1967, known as the “Summer of Love”, more than a hundred thousand people from all over the world gathered here. The atmosphere of creativity, pacifism and universal brotherhood, drugs, free love and rock and roll “Summer of Love” became as important an event in the culture of the sixties as the famous Woodstock festival.

There are a number of institutions of higher education in California, some of which are considered among the best universities in the United States. The largest University of California has ten campuses located in different cities of the state and more than one hundred and fifty thousand students! Among the private universities in California, the most famous are Stanford University, the California Institute of Technology, and the University of Southern California.

As in other states, modern California has a number of problems, including those related to the environment, the development of the transport system, energy, and illegal immigration. Nevertheless, California continues to be one of the most interesting and diverse states in the US – the “Golden State”.