TOEFL Test Centers in Zambia

By | February 16, 2019

TOEFL Test Centers in Zambia

The TOEFL iBT test is offered in this location.

The list below shows testing regions, fees and dates as of February 15, 2019, but availability may change when you register. Fees are shown in US$ and are subject to change without notice.

To find the most up-to-date list of available test centers (including addresses), dates and times, click the button below to create or sign in to your TOEFL iBT account, then click “Register for a Test.”
Region Testing Format Fee Test Dates
Lusaka TOEFL iBT $195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
Sat., Feb 23, 2019
Fri., Mar 08, 2019
Sat., Mar 09, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Sat., Apr 13, 2019
Sat., May 04, 2019
Fri., May 10, 2019
Sat., Jun 01, 2019
Sat., Jun 29, 2019
Fri., Jul 12, 2019

Zambia Overview

(Republic of Zambia). Southern African state (752,612 km²). Capital: Lusaka. Administrative division: provinces (9). Population: 12.840.180 residents (2009 estimate). English language. Religion: animists / traditional beliefs 27%, Protestants 22.9%, Catholics 16.9%, others 33.2%. Currency unit: Zambian kwacha (100 ngwee). Human Development Index: 0.453 (163rd place). Borders: Democratic Republic of Congo (N), Tanzania and Malawi (NE), Mozambique (E), Zimbabwe and Botswana (S), Namibia (SW), Angola (W). Member of: Commonwealth, UN, SADC, AU and WTO, EU associate.

Economy

The current productive structures of Zambia are still mostly those created in colonial times, essentially in function of the mining exploitation and in particular of copper. The government, after independence (1964), initiated reforms aimed at strengthening agriculture, diversifying industry, creating new development poles in addition to those that have long been built in a few economically privileged areas. However, the world economic crisis, the collapse of copper prices on international markets (in 1964 copper contributed 43% to the formation of the GDP of Zambia, in 1980 it dropped to 12% while still accounting for 90% of export earnings), the inevitable involvement of Zambia in the wars of southern Africa, which in the 1970s saw Angola, Mozambique and Zimbabwe as the main protagonists, the huge debts contracted with foreign countries and in particular with the International Monetary Fund, dragged the country into a serious economic crisis. After 1983, the determination to fully introduce the market economy (abolition of controlled prices and subsidies for basic necessities) and to pursue significant privatizations, to reduce the expenditure of the state budget and to stimulate foreign investment, while aiming to increasing the diversification of the national economy led to a rescheduling of debt, a beneficial effect on state finances, albeit at the cost of a sharp deterioration in living conditions. The recovery plan launched in the early 1990s, under the supervision of the IMF, led to the privatization of numerous public enterprises (especially in the copper sector) and, if on the one hand it meant that starting from 2000 there was an average rate of real increase in GDP of around 4.5% per year, it has not solved the structural problems of the economy. Zambia remains heavily dependent on the copper industry, international loans and is burdened with extremely high foreign debt. GDP growth (US $ 14,323 million) in 2008 was high, but inflation (12.4% in 2008) and the unemployment rate were also high. GDP inflation (12.4% in 2008) and the unemployment rate. GDP inflation (12.4% in 2008) and the unemployment rate. GDP per capita stands at medium-low levels: US $ 1,150 (2008). The social tension remains high as a result, the government tries to contain it with a policy of austerity.