TOEFL Test Centers in Uganda

By | February 16, 2019

TOEFL Test Centers in Uganda

The TOEFL iBT test is offered in this location.

The list below shows testing regions, fees and dates as of February 15, 2019, but availability may change when you register. Fees are shown in US$ and are subject to change without notice.

To find the most up-to-date list of available test centers (including addresses), dates and times, click the button below to create or sign in to your TOEFL iBT account, then click “Register for a Test.”
Region Testing Format Fee Test Dates
Kampala TOEFL iBT $195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
Sat., Mar 30, 2019
Sat., Apr 06, 2019
Sat., Apr 13, 2019
Sat., May 11, 2019
Sat., May 18, 2019
Sat., Jun 01, 2019
Sat., Jun 15, 2019
Sat., Jun 29, 2019
Sat., Jul 06, 2019
Sat., Jul 13, 2019
Sat., Jul 20, 2019
Sun., Jul 28, 2019

Uganda Overview

Uganda is a country in East Africa. Its capital is called Kampala. The landlocked state lies northwest of Lake Victoria and is predominantly occupied by a high plateau. Uganda has a tropical climate, which is somewhat moderate due to the altitude. A species-rich fauna lives in the open savannah landscapes and cloud forests in the mountains. Uganda is a multiethnic state in which different languages ​​are spoken. The official languages ​​are English and Swahili. The vast majority of the people are Christians and live as small farmers in the countryside. Uganda has taken in many refugees from the neighboring countries of South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Uganda is a presidential republic in which the president largely determines the country’s politics. After gaining independence from the British colonial power, the people of Uganda had many years of dictatorships of Milton Obote (* 1924, † 2005 ) and Idi Amin Dada (* 1925, † 2003 ) endure until it under President Yoweri Museveni (1944) the way towards a gradual democratization. Museveni has been using it since the 2000showever, everything possible to expand its power and to maintain it for life. Uganda is now increasingly turning back to an authoritarian regime. However, fighting hunger and poverty remains the country’s greatest challenge. With a very high population growth, the small agricultural farms can often no longer guarantee the supply of food. Many people are therefore looking for work in the capital. The natural resources are still little developed. There is a lack of skilled workers, machines and energy to expand the industry.

Population and Religion

Uganda has 44.3 million residents (2019). The population is made up of around 50 different tribes, two thirds of which belong to the Bantu peoples. Uganda has taken in many refugees from the neighboring countries of South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The population density is high in regional comparison with an average of 214 residents per km 2 (Germany: 237 residents per km²). The majority of the population lives in small, scattered villages north of Lake Victoria.

The annual population growth is extremely high. Almost half of the residents are under 15 years of age. Around 85% of the population are Christians, just under 14% are Muslims. The rituals of traditional African religions are still alive everywhere.

Violence, including sexual violence, against women and underage girls is still widespread. Even female genital mutilation is still practiced, despite the ban, especially among nomads in the north of the country. Homosexuality is a criminal offense in Uganda. There are hardly any doctors, especially in rural areas. The HIV infection rate ( AIDS ) in adults is around 6%. Also the Ebola fever has claimed human lives.

Politics and law

Uganda is a presidential republic and a member of the Commonwealth. The President is head of state, head of government and commander in chief of the armed forces. The president has a lot of power. B. the vice-president and the government chaired by the prime minister, as well as senior officials and judges. Yoweri Museveni (* 1944 ) has been President since 1986.

The National Assembly enacts the laws. In 2005 the multi-party system was reintroduced after a referendum. But there is still a long way to go to democracy in Uganda. The freedom of the press is restricted by law. In the last election, opposition leaders were arrested and placed under house arrest several times.

There is general compulsory schooling for children between the ages of 6 and 13. In Uganda, students wear school uniforms. There are often more than 70 children in a single class. However, many cannot attend classes regularly because they have to help their parents with housework and field work. After primary school, young people can attend secondary school, which after four years entitles them to attend college or university. In addition to the state educational institutions, there are many private and church schools for which school fees are charged. Most graduates leave the country after successfully completing their studies, as there are hardly any job opportunities for academics in Uganda.