TOEFL Test Centers in Switzerland

By | February 16, 2019

TOEFL Test Centers in Switzerland

The TOEFL iBT test is offered in this location.

The list below shows testing regions, fees and dates as of February 15, 2019, but availability may change when you register. Fees are shown in US$ and are subject to change without notice.

To find the most up-to-date list of available test centers (including addresses), dates and times, click the button below to create or sign in to your TOEFL iBT account, then click “Register for a Test.”
Region Testing Format Fee Test Dates
Geneva TOEFL iBT $295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
Sat., Feb 16, 2019
Sat., Feb 23, 2019
Fri., Mar 08, 2019
Sat., Mar 09, 2019
Sat., Mar 30, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Sat., Apr 13, 2019
Sat., May 04, 2019
Fri., May 10, 2019
Sat., May 11, 2019
Sat., May 18, 2019
Sat., Jun 01, 2019
Fri., Jun 14, 2019
Sat., Jun 15, 2019
Sat., Jun 29, 2019
Fri., Jul 12, 2019
Sat., Jul 13, 2019
Sat., Jul 27, 2019
Lausanne TOEFL iBT $295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
Sat., Apr 13, 2019
Sat., May 04, 2019
Sat., May 11, 2019
Sat., Jun 01, 2019
Sat., Jul 13, 2019
Sat., Jul 27, 2019
Montagnola TOEFL iBT $295
$295
Sat., Feb 16, 2019
Sat., Mar 16, 2019
St Gallen TOEFL iBT $295
$295
$295
$295
$295
Fri., Mar 08, 2019
Sat., Mar 30, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Sat., May 04, 2019
Fri., Jul 12, 2019
Zurich TOEFL iBT $295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
$295
Sat., Feb 16, 2019
Fri., Mar 08, 2019
Sat., Mar 16, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Sat., Apr 13, 2019
Sat., May 04, 2019
Fri., May 10, 2019
Sat., Jun 01, 2019
Sat., Jun 15, 2019
Fri., Jul 12, 2019

Switzerland Overview

Switzerland, French Suisse [s ɥ is], Italian Svizzera, Romansh: Svizra, officially the Swiss Confederation, Confédération Suisse [k ɔ federa sj ɔ s ɥ is], Confederazione Svizzera, Confederaziun Svizra, latin male Switzerland, abbreviation CH, State in Central Europe with (2018) 8.5 million residents; the de facto capital is Bern.

  • COUNTRYAAH: National flag of Switzerland. Includes the year when the flag was designed and formally used. Also covers its meaning and downloadable high definition image.

Politics and law

Switzerland is a parliamentary republic with 26 federal states, the cantons. In line with its federal structure, Switzerland has two chambers of parliament. The United Federal Assembly consists of the National Council with 200 members and the Council of States, representing the cantons, with 46 members. All citizens over the age of 18 are entitled to vote and can be elected. People living abroad can take part in federal elections. Women have only been able to vote in Switzerland since 1971, and in some cases only since 1990 at cantonal level. Elections take place every four years. The government, the seven-member Federal Council, is also elected every four years by the Federal Assembly. The »magic formula« was practiced since 1959, according to which the three largest parties each receive two seats and the fourth largest one. But it was not always followed after shifts in the party landscape. The basic idea is the principle of concordance, according to which as many important parties as possible should be represented in the government. In addition, the Federal Assembly appoints a member of the Federal Council as Federal President for one year, who in addition to his duties as head of a department of the federal administration mainly takes on a representative role. Currently (2020) this office is held by who, in addition to his duties as head of a department of the federal administration, mainly takes on a representative role. Currently (2020) this office is held by who, in addition to his duties as head of a department of the federal administration, mainly takes on a representative role. Currently (2020) this office is held by Simonetta Sommaruga (* 1960) exercised.

Direct democracy is particularly pronounced in Switzerland. Eligible voters are allowed to vote on many issues from the municipal to the federal level. For example, a government-approved accession to the European Union in 1992 was rejected by a narrow majority. However, Switzerland has been part of the Schengen area since 2004. In 1986 three quarters of those who voted were against joining the UN, in 2002 a majority was in favor. In many votes there are differences between French-speaking western Switzerland and German-speaking Switzerland (“Röstigraben”).

In terms of foreign policy, Switzerland sees itself as neutral. In the event of war, it does not take sides, but is armed. General compulsory military service applies to men. Only since 1992 has it been possible to do one and a half times longer community service.

Swiss law is essentially determined by the federal government. Private law is summarized in the Swiss Civil Code, which came into force in 1912, whereby various older legal traditions were taken into account. The criminal law was uniformly regulated in 1942. The death penalty has since been abolished.

In Switzerland, compulsory schooling lasts for eleven years. It begins at the age of four, divided into primary level (eight years including two years of kindergarten) and lower secondary level (three years). Over 90% of young people graduate after the four-year upper secondary level, with the majority opting for vocational training courses. Only around 22% of a year group opt for a high school Matura diploma (in Germany: Abitur over 40%). The oldest university is in Basel, it was founded in 1460.