TOEFL Test Centers in Slovakia

By | February 16, 2019

TOEFL Test Centers in Slovakia

The TOEFL iBT test is offered in this location.

The list below shows testing regions, fees and dates as of February 15, 2019, but availability may change when you register. Fees are shown in US$ and are subject to change without notice.

To find the most up-to-date list of available test centers (including addresses), dates and times, click the button below to create or sign in to your TOEFL iBT account, then click “Register for a Test.”
Region Testing Format Fee Test Dates
Stredoslovensky (central Slovakia) TOEFL iBT $235
$235
Sat., Apr 13, 2019
Sat., Jul 13, 2019
Vychodoslovensky (eastern Slovakia) TOEFL iBT $235
$235
$235
$235
$235
Sat., Mar 09, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Sat., May 18, 2019
Sat., Jun 15, 2019
Fri., Jul 12, 2019
Zapadoslovensky (western Slovakia) TOEFL iBT $235
$235
$235
$235
$235
$235
$235
$235
$235
$235
$235
$235
$235
$235
Fri., Mar 08, 2019
Sat., Mar 09, 2019
Sat., Mar 16, 2019
Sat., Mar 30, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Sat., Apr 13, 2019
Sat., May 04, 2019
Fri., May 10, 2019
Sat., May 11, 2019
Sat., May 18, 2019
Sat., Jun 01, 2019
Fri., Jun 14, 2019
Sat., Jun 15, 2019
Sat., Jun 29, 2019

Slovakia Overview

The Slovakia (officially: Slovak Republic), Slovak Slovensko or Slovenská republika, is a republic in Central Europe (2018) 5.4 million residents; The capital is Bratislava.

  • COUNTRYAAH: National flag of Slovakia. Includes the year when the flag was designed and formally used. Also covers its meaning and downloadable high definition image.

History

From the 10th century until 1914, Hungary ruled over the Slovaks. The Slovak people are linguistically very closely related to the Czechs, but historically and historically they are two independent peoples. In 1918 the political leadership founded a Czechoslovak nation-state to lead the country out of backwardness and poverty. During World War II, Nazi Germany occupied Czechoslovakia and separated Slovakia from it. This led to the “Slovak National Uprising” in 1944.

After 1945 Slovakia again became part of what was later to become a socialist Czechoslovakia. In the 1950s, Czechs and Slovaks protested that the Communists were patronizing them. The »Prague Spring« 1968 ended with the arrest of Gustáv Husák (* 1913, † 1991) and Alexander Dubček’s expulsion from the party. As leaders of the communist party, they had campaigned for liberalization and democratization in their country. In 1969 Slovakia became formally independent within the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic (ČSSR). The “Charter 77” supported by Václav Havel was unsuccessful.

In 1993 the Slovak Republic became independent. The change from socialism to democracy and a market economy led to social tensions and partly to nationalism. Corruption scandals in government and business increased in the 2000s. Foreign policy tensions in relation to Germany and the EU grew.

In 2004 Slovakia became a member of the EU and NATO, in 2009 of the euro zone. In the refugee crisis that has escalated since 2015, Slovakia and the Visegrád Group refused to accept a quota system. Your complaint to the European Court of Justice was dismissed in 2017. Corruption and abuse of power by top Slovak politicians continued to increase. After the murder of investigative journalist Ján Kuciak (* 1990, † 2018) in 2018, there were mass protests.

Prime Minister Robert Fico (* 1964), lawyer, politician and chairman of the Smer-SD party he founded, had to resign. The issues of corruption and the mafia also dominated the 2020 National Council elections. The strongest force was the party »Simple People and Independent Personalities« (OL’aNO). In addition to an economic upturn, the new government is expected to reform the police and judiciary and come to terms with the scandals.

Culture

The culture of Slovakia includes the heritage of Slovaks, Ukrainians, Poles, Hungarians, Austrians and other nations. Traditions, customs and folklore live and show the Slovaks in everyday life.

Until the 18th century, the Slovaks had no written and literary language of their own. It was created by Ľudovít Štúr (* 1815, † 1856) in the middle of the 19th century. The Slovak modernist literature was founded by the poet Ivan Krasko (* 1876, † 1958). Important writers of the 20th century were Milan Rúfus (* 1928, † 2009), who was repeatedly nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature, and Ladislav Mňačko (* 1919, † 1994).

The international music festival in Bratislava, the Zvolen Castle Festival and the folklore festivals in Detva, Myjava and Východná are very popular. In 2013, Košice was European Capital of Culture together with Marseille. Historical monuments and ensembles range from Romanesque round buildings such as the Spiš Castle, Gothic churches (e.g. the Church of St. James in Levoča), listed city districts and villages (such as Špania Dolina) to modern urban architecture.

Slavic roots and influences from other nations are reflected in the music. Old Slovak melodies and typical instruments such as fujara and bagpipes have been preserved in folk music. The popular music (electro-pop, hip-hop, etc.) is international. The rock group “Živé Kvety” (Living Flowers), founded in 1994, made it to New York with time-critical songs. The director Ján Kadár (* 1918, † 1979) received an Oscar in 1956 for the film “The Store on the Corso”. Barbora Bobuľová (* 1974) is an internationally known Slovak actress.

The most successful international sport is ice hockey, although soccer is even more popular. Professional cyclist Peter Sagan won the road world championship three times in a row. Other popular sports include mountain biking, water sports, climbing, caving, horse riding, golf, paragliding, tennis and – given the success – winter sports. A popular national sport is cycling at all altitudes.