TOEFL Test Centers in Gambia

By | February 16, 2019

TOEFL Test Centers in Gambia

The TOEFL iBT test is offered in this location.

The list below shows testing regions, fees and dates as of February 15, 2019, but availability may change when you register. Fees are shown in US$ and are subject to change without notice.

To find the most up-to-date list of available test centers (including addresses), dates and times, click the button below to create or sign in to your TOEFL iBT account, then click “Register for a Test.”
Region Testing Format Fee Test Dates
Banjul TOEFL iBT $180
$180
$180
$180
$180
$180
Sat., Feb 23, 2019
Fri., Mar 08, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Sat., May 04, 2019
Sat., Jun 01, 2019
Fri., Jul 12, 2019

Gambia Overview

Gambia, state on the west coast of Africa, on the lower reaches of the Gambia. Extensive mangrove swamps extend in its estuary, followed by rainforest and savannas inland. 90% of the population (different tribes) are Muslims. The most important branch of the economy is agriculture (export of peanuts), besides tourism has become more and more important. The Gambia is one of the poorest countries in the world.

History: The area belonged to the 13th – 15th centuries. Century to the kingdom of Mali. In 1843 Gambia became a British crown colony, and in 1965 it gained independence under the Commonwealth; In 1970 the republic was proclaimed. In 2013 Gambia declared its withdrawal from the Commonwealth of Nations.

Country facts

  • Official name: Republic of the Gambia
  • License plate: WAG
  • ISO-3166: GM, GMB (270)
  • Internet domain:.gm
  • Currency: 1 Dalasi (D) = 100 bututs
  • Area: 11,300 km²
  • Population (2019): 2.3 million
  • Capital: Banjul
  • Official language (s): English
  • Form of government: Presidential Republic
  • Administrative structure: 8 local government areas
  • Head of State: President Adama Barrow (since January 19, 2017)
  • Religion (s) (2013): 96% Muslims; 4% Christians, others / not specified
  • Time zone: Central European Time -1 hour
  • National Day: February 18

Location and infrastructure

  • Location (geographical): West Africa
  • Position (coordinates): between 13 ° and 13 ° 50 ‘north latitude and 13 ° 50’ and 16 ° 50 ‘west longitude
  • Climate: Tropical savanna climate
  • Road network (2011): 518 km (paved), 2 459 km (unpaved)

Population

  • Annual population growth (2020): 1.9%
  • Birth rate (2020): 27 per 1000 residents.
  • Death rate (2020): 6.7 per 1000 residents.
  • Average age (2020): 21.8 years
  • Average life expectancy (2020): 65.8 years (men 63.5; women 68.3)
  • Age structure (2020): 36% younger than 15 years, 3.7% older than 65 years
  • Literacy rate (15-year-olds and older) (2015): 50.8%
  • Mobile phone contracts (pre-paid and post-paid) (2018): 140 per 100 residents
  • Internet users (2017): 20 per 100 residents

Economy

  • GDP per capita (2019): US $ 755
  • Total GDP (2019): US $ 1.773 billion
  • GNI per capita (2019): US $ 740
  • Education expenditure (2018): 2.4% of GDP
  • Military expenditure (2019): 0.8% of GDP
  • Unemployment rate (15 years and older) (2019): 9.1%

Climate

The climate is humid. The rainy season generated by the southeast trade winds lasts from May / June to October (1300–1600 mm precipitation per year). The temperature fluctuations are small on the coast (high humidity) and increase inland. The months of November to February / March are characterized by the northeast trade wind (Harmattan), it is dry and cooler.

 

History

Written evidence about the area of ​​today’s Gambia can already be found in pre-Christian Carthage. In 10./11. In the 16th century AD, Gambia was part of the Gana Empire, from the 13th to the 15th centuries to the kingdom of Mali. In the mid-15th century, Portuguese sailors appeared on the coast, starting the transatlantic slave trade and five centuries of rule by European powers. At the end of the 15th century, the Portuguese established trading posts on the lower Gambia River and in 1588 sold trading rights on the river to English merchants. In 1661, British traders build Fort James on a river island. In 1681 the French secured the enclave of Albreda, but ceded it to the British in 1857. In 1783 the British ousted the French from Gambia and soon after the abolition of the slave trade in 1816 they founded Bathurst (now Banjul) as a British naval base, administered from Sierra Leone. Bathurst became a British Crown Colony in 1843, but fell again from 1866 to 1888 under the administration of Sierra Leone. After that, the British also occupied the hinterland, declared Gambia a crown colony and divided it into a colony (Greater Bathurst) and a protectorate. The final demarcation of the Gambia with the French Senegal dates from the agreements of 1889 and 1904 between Great Britain and France. In the 1950s, political parties were formed that were able to take on political responsibility through the constitution of 1954 (or 1959) and whose representatives were gradually involved in government from 1954 onwards. After the 1962 elections, the Gambia received full internal political self-government a year later. On February 18, 1965, the country became independent and a member of the declared Gambia a crown colony and divided it into a colony (Greater Bathurst) and a protectorate. The final demarcation of the Gambia with the French Senegal dates from the agreements of 1889 and 1904 between Great Britain and France. In the 1950s, political parties were formed that were able to take on political responsibility through the constitution of 1954 (or 1959) and whose representatives were gradually involved in government from 1954 onwards. After the 1962 elections, the Gambia received full internal political self-government a year later.On February 18, 1965, the country became independent and a member of the Commonwealth. The British Queen remained the nominal head of state until the Gambia was transformed into a republic.

The Gambia became a republic on April 24, 1970, but remained in the Commonwealth. Dawda Kairaba Jawara (* 1924, † 2019), Prime Minister (1962–82) and chairman of the ruling People’s Progressive Party (PPP), was president and elected several times. In 1980/81 there were repeated coup attempts, which Jawara was able to suppress with the help of Senegalese troops. A military agreement with Senegal has existed since the Gambia’s independence. Under the name Senegambia, the Gambia and Senegal formed a confederation from 1982-89, but Senegal terminated it.