TOEFL Test Centers in Dominican Republic

By | February 16, 2019

TOEFL Test Centers in Dominican Republic

The TOEFL iBT test is offered in this location.

The list below shows testing regions, fees and dates as of February 15, 2019, but availability may change when you register. Fees are shown in US$ and are subject to change without notice.

To find the most up-to-date list of available test centers (including addresses), dates and times, click the button below to create or sign in to your TOEFL iBT account, then click “Register for a Test.”
Region Testing Format Fee Test Dates
Cap Cana TOEFL iBT $195
$195
$195
$195
$195
Fri., Mar 08, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Fri., May 10, 2019
Sat., Jun 15, 2019
Fri., Jul 12, 2019
Santiago, Dr TOEFL iBT $195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
Sat., Mar 16, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Sat., Apr 13, 2019
Sat., May 04, 2019
Sat., Jun 15, 2019
Fri., Jul 12, 2019
Sat., Jul 13, 2019
Santo Domingo TOEFL iBT $195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
$195
Fri., Mar 08, 2019
Sat., Mar 09, 2019
Sat., Mar 16, 2019
Sat., Mar 30, 2019
Fri., Apr 05, 2019
Sat., Apr 13, 2019
Sat., May 04, 2019
Fri., May 10, 2019
Sat., May 11, 2019
Sat., May 18, 2019
Sat., Jun 01, 2019
Fri., Jun 14, 2019
Sat., Jun 15, 2019
Sat., Jun 29, 2019
Fri., Jul 12, 2019
Sat., Jul 13, 2019
Sat., Jul 27, 2019

Dominican Republic Overview

Dominican Republic, Republic in the eastern part of the West Indies island of Hispaniola. The mountainous island has a tropical climate and fertile coastal plains in the south. The residents, especially mulattos, grow sugar cane (sugar is the main export good), bananas, tobacco, coffee and cocoa. Mining mainly produces silver, gold, nickel and iron ore. The most important source of foreign exchange is tourism.

History: The island of Hispaniola, visited by Christopher Columbus in 1492, belonged to the Spanish colonial empire; the native Indian population was exterminated as early as the 16th century. In 1821 the eastern part declared itself independent, but was occupied by Haiti in 1822 and was only able to break away from Haiti as an independent republic in 1844.

Country facts

  • Official name: Dominican Republic
  • License plate: DOM
  • ISO-3166: DO, DOM (214)
  • Internet domain:.do
  • Currency: 1 Dominican Peso (dom $) = 100 Centavos
  • Area: 48 670 km²
  • Population (2018): 10.6 million
  • Capital: Santo Domingo
  • Official language (s): Spanish
  • Form of government: Presidential Republic
  • Administrative division: 10 regions with 31 provinces and capital district
  • Head of State: President Luís Abinader Corona (since August 16, 2020)
  • Religion (s) (2017): Christians (47.8% Catholics; 21.3% Protestants), 28% non-denominational, 2.9% other / n / a
  • Time zone: Central European Time -5 hours
  • National Holidays: February 27th and August 16th

Location and infrastructure

  • Location (geographical): Caribbean
  • Location (coordinates): between 17 ° 30 ‘and 20 ° north latitude and 71 ° 30’ and 68 ° 30 ‘west longitude
  • Climate: Tropical, alternately humid climate with dry season in winter
  • Highest mountain: Pico Duarte (3,098 m)
  • Road network (2002): 9 872 km (paved), 9 833 km (unpaved)
  • Railway network (2014): 496 km

Population

  • Annual population growth (2020): 1%
  • Birth rate (2020): 18.5 per 1,000 residents.
  • Death rate (2020): 6.3 per 1,000 residents.
  • Average age (2020): 27.9 years
  • Average life expectancy (2020): 72 years (men 70.3; women 73.8)
  • Age structure (2020): 26.9% younger than 15 years, 6.3% older than 65 years
  • Literacy rate (15-year-olds and older) (2016): 93.8%
  • Mobile phone contracts (pre-paid and post-paid) (2017): 81 per 100 residents
  • Internet users (2017): 65 per 100 residents

Economy

  • GDP per capita (2018): US $ 7,881
  • Total GDP (2018): $ 81 billion
  • GNI per capita (2018): US $ 7,760
  • Education expenditure (2013): 3.7% of GDP
  • Military expenditure (2018): 0.7% of GDP
  • Unemployment rate (15 years and older) (2017): 5.5%

History

In 2010 a new constitution came into force. The PLD was able to defend an absolute majority in the parliamentary elections in the same year. In 2012, PLD candidate D. Medina Sánchez won the presidential election with 51.2% of the vote. According to a corresponding ruling by the Constitutional Court, in 2013 all persons born between 1929 and 2010 in the Dominican Republic, whose parents had not obtained Dominican citizenship as legal immigrants, lost their citizenship. Since the decision primarily concerned the descendants of Haitian immigrants, foreign policy tensions arose with the neighboring country. The CARICOM suspended the Dominican Republic’s membership application. After negotiations with Haiti in 2014, the government gave those affected by the judgment the option of registering by mid-2015 in order to retain their citizenship or apply for a new one. In June 2015, the National Congress passed a constitutional amendment that allows the president to run for a second term. On May 15, 2016 elections were held for the local councils, for both chambers of parliament and for the presidential election. The legislative period of the National Congress elected in 2010 was exceptionally extended from four to six years so that parliamentary and presidential elections could take place on the same day. In the presidential election, the people gave Medina Sánchez, who benefited from the positive economic development of the country, the mandate for a further term.

In the presidential election on July 5, 2020, Luís Abinader Corona (* 1967) from the Modern Revolutionary Party (PRM) prevailed against candidate Gonzalo Castillo (* 1960) from the ruling PLD with 52.5% of the votes. Medina Sánchez was not allowed to run after two terms. In the simultaneous election of the Senate, the PRM got 17 of the 32 seats. Abinader took office on August 16, 2020. Politicians have to fight the economic crisis that the country is in after the slump in tourism due to the corona crisis.