Tag Archives: Study in New Zealand

Former British protectorate, New Zealand became a dominion in 1907 and an independent state from 1931 within the Commonwealth. Without a written Constitution, the country is governed by a constitutional monarchy that recognizes the sovereign of Great Britain as head of state, represented by a governor general (in office for 5 years) who is appointed by the same sovereign on designation by the New Zealand government.. The executive power is exercised by the Prime Minister, leader of the majority party, and by the Executive Council, responsible before the House of Representatives, which has the legislative power and whose members, elected by universal suffrage (5 of which Maori) remain in office. for 3 years. The legal system in use is based on the British one, although there is a mixture of Maori rules. International jurisdiction is accepted with reservations. Justice is administered through several bodies: the High Court, the appellate courts and the Supreme Court. There are also bodies of special jurisdiction in trade union matters and for matters relating to the Maori community. The armed forces present in the country are divided into three parts in traditional weapons: army, air force, navy; military service is voluntary from the age of 17. Education has been compulsory since 1852, and has been extended from 6 to 17 years of age. New Zealand’s close cultural ties with Great Britain have greatly influenced the New Zealand school organization which is characterized by large administrative decentralization. Furthermore, the percentage of illiteracy is practically nil. Primary school (in which there are classes in English and Maori or only Maori) is divided into three cycles: infantile (two-year), intermediate (five-year) and primary superior (two-year). The secondary school of general education (five years) includes optional courses of a technical nature and gives access to the university. Higher education is given in numerous universities: Otago (Dunedin, 1869), Canterbury (Christchurch, 1873), Victoria (Wellington, 1897), Auckland (1957), Massey (Palmerston, 1963), Waikato (Hamilton, 1964). According to COUNTRYAAH, New Zealand is a nation in Polynesia, the capital city of which is Wellington. The latest population of New Zealand is 4,822,244.
CLIMATE
Although New Zealand extends in latitude between 33 ° and 53 ° S, there are no strong climatic differentiations due to the profound influence of the oceanic waters, relatively cool, and the strong western winds (the so-called westerlies), promoted by the anticyclone. of the Indian Ocean and attracted by the southern depressions, particularly sensitive to the S of the 40th parallel, which almost constantly hit the country, discharging abundant rainfall on the hills perpendicular to their flow: there are on average from 150 to 200 rainy days. The average temperature values ​​are not high and the temperature variations quite contained (in Wellington the annual average is 12.9 ºC with a summer of 17 ºC and a winter of 8.5 ºC): in general the climate can be defined as temperate oceanic. In the northern part of the North Island and in the Auckland peninsula, however, there are semi-tropical climatic conditions (the average summer temperature rises to 21 ºC, the winter one to 11 ºC), of a Mediterranean type, and is affected by the passage of tropical cyclonic perturbations, while in the southern one of South Island, in the Otago and Southland regions, the climate tends to continental (Dunedin averages 6ºC in winter, 15ºC in summer). Precipitation is naturally more abundant on the western slopes, especially along the barrier of the New Zealand Alps where at an altitude of 2000 m, just below the persistent snow limit, over 5000 mm of rain per year also fall. In the eastern regions, rainfall is much more contained, from values ​​around 1100 mm in the North Island, to less than 1000 mm for most of the eastern side of the South Island and even below 500 mm in the Otago region.; the eastern foothills are also affected by the influence of hot and dry winds, of similar genesis to Föhn . Rare at sea level, snowfalls become more intense and widespread on the reliefs; on the highest peaks there is snow for at least thirty days a year; in particular in the South Island the snow remains on the ground for a long time over 1000 m and all year round above 2100 m, feeding numerous glaciers that along the western side descend with their tongues up to 300-400 m.

New Zealand Travel Facts

New Zealand is an isolated island nation in the South Pacific. The country consists of two large islands – the North and South Islands – and more than 700 smaller islands. Australia is not too far away and yet New Zealand is very different. Beautifully landscaped and unique, it is one of the geologically youngest… Read More »

New Zealand 1938

NEW ZEALAND (XXV, p. 67). – History (p. 75). – The elections to Parliament in November 1935 saw in this Dominion the triumph of Labor who obtained 52 seats against 20 for the ruling party, 8 for the independents and none for the Democrats. The government, chaired by Forbes, had to forcibly resign and was… Read More »

New Zealand 1949

According to the 1945 census, New Zealand’s population was 1,702,298. (without dependencies) divided by provinces, as follows: Since the last census (1936) the absolute increase of the population (excluding the annexed and external islands) was 128,488 residents (1,573,810 in 1936). This modest increase is almost exclusively due to the natural increase, since, in the last… Read More »

New Zealand 1961

From 1949 the Tokelau Islands, already administered by NZ from 1926 onwards, became part of the New Zealand state. However, the metropolitan territory remains unchanged. The geological study of the islands continued; geophysical and seismic investigations continue, and we note the decrease in earthquakes (3093 in the decade 1929-38, 1642 in the decade 1939-48, and… Read More »

New Zealand Cinematography

CINEMATOGRAPHY Although a New Zealand character actress like Nola Luxford worked in Hollywood in the 1920s and 1930s, and in the early 21st century, a popular performer like Sam Neill (born in Northern Ireland but from a New Zealand family), or a star like Russell Crowe, only since the end of the seventies, with the… Read More »

New Zealand Facts for Kids

Europe in the South Seas In the mid-nineteenth century there were a thousand Europeans in New Zealand, and three hundred thousand indigenous Maori. Today the archipelago has an aspect that could be defined as European: the population is of British origin, its lifestyle is very close to that of Europe, its cities seem to have… Read More »

New Zealand 2007

HUMAN AND ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY Island state of Oceania located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. According to estimates by the New Zealand Institute of Statistics, the population in 2005 stood at 4,082,400 residents, with a density of 15 residents / km 2. The positive demographic dynamics of the last decades, mainly attributable to natural balances, are… Read More »

New Zealand History Summary

New Zealand State of Oceania. The NZ archipelago was inhabited from the 10th to the 14th century. by Polynesian populations that arrived in various waves from the Cook Islands and perhaps Hawaii. In 1642-43 the Dutchman AJ Tasman skirted the western parts of the two major islands; the complete survey of the coasts and the… Read More »

New Zealand Literature

The beginnings of literature in New Zealand are linked on the one hand to the stories of travels and explorations, on the other hand to the adoption of English models. A more mature literary consciousness appears towards the end of the 19th century, thanks to novelists such as W. Satchell and ES Grossman. The first… Read More »

New Zealand Brief History

In 1642-43 the Dutchman AJ Tasman skirted the western parts of the two major islands; the integral survey of the coasts and the first internal penetration were the work of J. Cook (1769-72). In the following years the fame of the ferocity of the indigenous peoples prevented any colonial settlement or missionary initiative, while on… Read More »

New Zealand Population and Economy

Population When the first Europeans arrived in New Zealand, the territory was inhabited by the Maori, a population of Polynesian lineage far from primitive, divided into groups and dedicated to agriculture and some industries. The true aborigines would be the Moors (i.e. the people lower according to the Maori), perhaps related to the Melanesians, gatherers… Read More »

New Zealand Languages

The language of the indigenous people of New Zealand is Maori, a word which means, in the language itself, “indigenous, straightforward, good”; it says p. ex. wai maori “fresh water”; in the Easter Island language, closely connected with it, Maori means “capable”. Maori belongs to the family of Maleo-Polynesian languages ​​(v. Maleo – Polynesian, languages),… Read More »

New Zealand Ethnology

The Maori, who according to tradition have come down to 30 generations from the legendary Hawaiki under the guidance of their chief Ngahue, in the north of the North Island – tradition still knows the name of their boats – were light-skinned Polynesians, probably coming from the Tonga or the Cook Archipelago. They found the… Read More »

New Zealand Anthropology

Speaking of the anthropology of the Maori it is appropriate to say together of the Moors, because the comparison allows essential deductions. There are very few findings on the living for both. Many have mentioned the special features of the Maori, which has been called Mediterranean or pseudomediterranean, with much exaggeration. Giuffrida-Ruggeri, basing himself on… Read More »

New Zealand History

New Zealand was not, until the end of the fourth decade of the nineteenth century, a colonial establishment of any importance. An English community that had settled there in 1825 had had to leave it terrified; an attempt to take possession of Baron Thierry, in 1835, was dropped by the French government. It was only… Read More »

New Zealand Production and Trade

The economic bases of the region are represented by agriculture, livestock and mining production. Over two thirds of the New Zealand area is suitable for agriculture. However, only 7,737,095 hectares of land, equal to about one third of the total area, were cultivated in 1929. The abundance of forage grass allows the breeding of very… Read More »

New Zealand Government, Military and Economy

Constitution. – The Dominion of New Zealand, created with the order in the British SM Council of 26 September 1907, derives from the ancient autonomous colony of the same name; which with the law of 1875, suppressing the provinces to attribute the functions of their superintendents to the governor, lost that sort of federal character… Read More »

New Zealand Population and Communication

Population. – The indigenous population is represented by the Maori, reduced today (1933) to about 71,000 individuals (see below: Ethnology). Today, however, white immigrants and their successors have greater importance than indigenous people, who now represent almost the entire population of the archipelago (1,465,833 residents). Today New Zealand is the most British of British colonies,… Read More »

New Zealand Flora

Flora. – New Zealand, with the Chatam, Campbell and Macquarie islands, forms a distinct southern floristic domain which appears as a fragment of an emerged area, which must have assumed continental importance in the past. The character of its vegetation is Melanesian; but the great extension that this domain presents in the sense of the… Read More »

New Zealand Fauna

Fauna The fauna of this group of islands offers remarkable peculiarities. Mammals are extremely scarce: there are represented by some Pinnipeds, two Chiroptera and a mouse, in addition to the problematic Waitoteke, never captured, similar to an otter, and which is supposed to be a monotreme. Numerous birds, represented by twenty-seven families, four of which… Read More »

New Zealand Climate

New Zealand generally enjoys an oceanic climate characterized by small annual temperature variations and by the abundance of rainfall distributed throughout the months of the year. Given the large latitude extension of the archipelago, there are however considerable differences in the average temperature between the northernmost point, where there is an annual average of about… Read More »

New Zealand Geology

New Zealand perhaps represents the eastern edge of a larger continental form, broken up and destroyed by a series of partial collapses, due to numerous fractures, which occurred at different times. The very complex series of marine deposits subsequent to the Mesozoic that can be observed in the archipelago would in fact demonstrate the various… Read More »

New Zealand Morphology

The horizontal configuration of the New Zealand is characterized by the presence of large coastal sickles and spacious and semicircular breasts, in turn more or less affected by numerous and complex indentations, especially on the northern coasts and on those of the Auckland Peninsula, just attached to the trunk main island via the Auckland Isthmus,… Read More »

New Zealand Exploration

Almost in the center of the oceanic hemisphere, 2000 km. about to ESE. of Australia, from which it is separated by the Tasman Sea, extends the Archipelago of New Zealand, oriented from the SW. NE., for a length of over 1500 km. The extreme points of the archipelago are at New Zealand Capo Maria van… Read More »

New Zealand 1979

On the occasion of the demographic census of 1961, the NZ carried out an administrative reorganization, dismembering the statistical area of ​​Auckland, at the northern end, into 4 new districts. of the North Island, and slightly retouching the two boroughs of Otago, at the southern end. of the South Island. In 1965, moreover, the atoll… Read More »

New Zealand Cinema

New Zealand cinema gained momentum in the late 1970s with the establishment in 1978 of the state body New Zeland Film Commission, which promotes local productions, and the creation of Welling ton Studios. A system of tax incentives and the emergence on the market of cutting-edge companies for special effects have meant that with the… Read More »

New Zealand Architecture and Literature

Architecture With the aim of analyzing the impact of globalization on its architectural production, in 2014 NZ was invited for the first time to participate in the Venice International Architecture Biennale; David Mitchell, creative director of the pavilion, is a leading figure in the architectural panorama of a country characterized by a unique geographical, climatic,… Read More »

New Zealand 2015

New Zealand is an island state of Oceania located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. According to an estimate by UNDESA (United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs), in 2014 the population was equal to 4,551,349 residents, With a growth rate of 1.0% per year (2010-15) and a density of about 17 residents / km… Read More »

New Zealand Cinema 1993

The first film shots made in NZ date back to the end of the 19th century; but only in 1914 did G. Tarr make his first feature film, Hinemoa, based on a Maori legend. Two years later R. Blandford signed The Test, a dramatic story based on a novel by W. Satchell, as producer, director… Read More »

New Zealand Literature 1993

As in the case of other colonial territories, the beginnings of NZ literature can be traced back to stories of travel and exploration. Among the first documents emerges A first year in Canterbury settlement (1863) by the Victorian S. Butler (1835-1902), who nevertheless showed himself skeptical about the cultural future of the colony, still engaged… Read More »