Senegal Ecological Problems

Senegal Ecological Problems

Senegal has had its own environmental law since January 15, 2001, and the Ministry of the Environment was established in the same year.

Despite the relatively progressive legislature and, with the publication of the third national report on the state of the environment after 2005 and 2010, in July 2016, a broad environmental monitoring program, there are countless environmentally harmful practices across the country: for the general public, the daily struggle for survival is closer than the thought future generations. Companies, tourist facilities and industry usually think of their own profit first. Air pollution is worrying in the capital Dakar accepted. In addition, Senegal is affected by global phenomena such as climate change and the associated coastal erosion and is trying to counteract these with climate policy.

Deforestation (according to the FAO, 40,000 hectares of forest disappear annually in Senegal), leaching of the soil through decades of peanut cultivation, extensive use of pesticides and salinization of the soil destroy the soil resources, so that large areas of land are affected by desertification.

A GIZ project supported the distribution of improved stoves with less fuelwood consumption until 2016

A GIZ project supported the distribution of improved stoves with less fuelwood consumption until 2016

Charcoal burner with charcoal

Charcoal burner with charcoal

Firewood collector

Firewood collector

To this day, fossil fuels (wood and charcoal) are the most important household energy sources; they are primarily used for cooking. In large areas of the country the supply is deficient today, in the wooded south, among other things, the Casamance conflict makes effective control more difficult. In a program until 2016, German development cooperation supported the permanent supply of household fuels, the distribution of improved stoves and the joint use of forests for a permanent supply of firewood.

Mountains of rubbish are omnipresent in town and country, and the masses of plastic are particularly problematic. In the coastal areas, wastewater is usually discharged directly into the sea without treatment and the city of Dakar is still crossed by open canals that spill into the sea. Dakar is also affected by severe air pollution, efforts are being made to counteract this and slowly to renew the outdated vehicle fleet (shared taxis and taxis).

Mountains of rubbish

Mountains of rubbish

With more than 500 km of coastline, as one of 16 countries located in Western Africa according to transporthint, Senegal is acutely threatened by rising sea levels. At the same time, this threatening development is intensified by the intensive (illegal) mining of sea sand on the beaches, so that today some suburbs of Dakar are acutely threatened by the advance of the sea.

The African research initiative Africa talks Climate found in a study in Senegal that although the population is aware of the fact of climate change and the degradation of their living conditions, they do not know about the causes.

Today there is general consensus that Africa will be particularly hard hit by climate change.

Senegal Overview

Official name: Republic of Senegal

Area: 196,712 km²

Residents: 15.74 million, (2020, estimated)

Growth of population: 2.31% (2020, estimated)

Seat of government: Dakar

Official language: French

Regional languages: Wolof, Serer, Peulh et al

Location

Senegal is located on the westernmost tip of the African continent and is often referred to as the gateway to Africa.

In the west, the country borders with an approximately 500 km long coastline on the Atlantic Ocean, in the north on Mauritania, in the east on Mali and in the south on Guinea and Guinea-Bissau. The former British colony of Gambia forms an enclave that separates the southern part of Casamance from the rest of the country.

Location of Senegal in West Africa 2

Location of Senegal in West Africa 2

Overview map with the most important cities

Overview map with the most important cities

Overview maps

  • Administrative division of the country and regions
  • Relief map
  • City maps and satellite views
  • Map collection of thematic maps
  • Constantly updated map collection on the humanitarian situation

A Sahara-Sahel atlas illustrates the comparison of Senegal with the West African countries and its interdependencies in the regional context. For the first time, a cartography project has produced maps of the individual regions that meet modern requirements (as of 2002, ie 11 regions instead of the current administrative division into 14 regions) of the entire national territory on a scale of 1: 200,000. There is also a rough view on the Internet. The detailed paper version is distributed via the Direction des travaux géographiques et cartographiques, where additional maps can be found.

Basic data

In the current report of the UN Development Program on Human Development for 2020, Senegal is currently ranked 168th out of 189 nations examined.

The Federal Foreign Office, for example, offers general basic information about the country, while the Federal Statistical Office, the World Bank and the UN Statistical Department or the CIA’s World Factbook have available data and figures on extensive topics. On the Senegalese side, the National Agency for Statistics and Demography (ANSD) provides information on numerous topics.