SAT Test Centers and Dates in Brazil

By | March 18, 2019

According to the College Board, there are 18 test centers for SAT and SAT Subject Tests in Brazil. Please note that before you register either of the SAT exams, you should choose your test date and test location. Each testing location is affiliated with an educational institution, such as high school, community college, or university. The following test centers administer one or more of 2019 and 2020 SAT tests in Brazil.

SAT Test Centers and Dates in Brazil

2019 – 2020 SAT Test Dates in Brazil

  • March 9, 2019
  • May 4, 2019
  • June 1, 2019
  • August 24, 2019
  • October 5, 2019
  • November 2, 2019
  • December 7, 2019
  • March 14, 2020
  • May 2, 2020
  • June 6, 2020
  • August 29, 2020
  • October 3, 2020
  • November 7, 2020
  • December 5, 2020

SAT Testing Centers in Brazil

AMERICAN SCH OF RECIFE

Address: Rua Sa E Souza, 408, Recife, Pe, Brazil
Center Code: 84575

CASA THOMAS JEFFERSON

Address: Shcsw-eqsw 301/302-lote 2, Sudoeste, Brasilia, Brazil
Center Code: 84514

COLEGIO BANDEIRANTES

Address: Rua Estela 268, Sao Paulo Sp, Brazil
Center Code: 84583

COLEGIO DANTE ALIGHIERI

Address: Alameda Casa Branca, Sao Paulo, Sp, Brazil
Center Code: 84592

COLEGIO LUIZ DE QUEIROZ

Address: Av. Cezira Giovanoni Moretti,1100, Piracicaba Sp, Brazil
Center Code: 84561

COLEGIO NOTRE DAME DE CAMPINAS

Address: Rua Egberto F. De A. Camargo, 151, Campinas Sp, Brazil
Center Code: 84523

ESCOLA AMERICANA DE CAMPINAS

Address: Rua Cajamar 35, High Sch Blding, Campinas Sp, Brazil
Center Code: 84525

ESCOLA AMERICANA DO RIO

Address: Escola Americana Do Rio De Janeiro, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Center Code: 84580

ESCOLA DE EDUCACAO BASICA PRUDENTINA

Address: Rua Jose Bongiovani 1595, Presidente Prudente Sp, Brazil
Center Code: 84593

ESCOLA ELEVA

Address: Rua General Severiano 159, Rio De Janiero, Brazil
Center Code: 84578

ESCOLA MARIA IMACULADA-CHAPEL SCH

Address: R Vigario Joao De Pontes 537, Sao Paulo, Sp, Brazil
Center Code: 84588

INTL SCH OF CURITIBA

Address: Santa Felicidade, Curitiba Parana, Brazil
Center Code: 84530

OUR LADY OF MERCY

Address: Rua Visconde De Caravelas, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Center Code: 84579

PAN AMERICAN SCH

Address: Avenida Joao Obino 110, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Center Code: 84562

PAN AMERICAN SCH OF BAHIA

Address: Loteamento Patamares S/n Piata, Salvador Bahia, Brazil
Center Code: 84595

SANT ANNA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

Address: Av. Independencia, 5656, Vinhedo,sp, Brazil
Center Code: 84600

ST. FRANCIS COLLEGE

Address: Rua Joaquim Antunes 678, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Center Code: 84584

UNIV REGIONAL INTEGRADA-ERECHIM

Address: Av.7 De Setembro,1621, Erechim,rs, Brazil
Center Code: 84547

More about Brazil

  • USAERS: Modern history of Brazil from World War I to today, covering all major events on politics, economy, society, and technology.

Population

Brazil is the most populous country in South America. According to statistical data, whites predominate with about 48% of the population. 43% are mixed descendants from combinations of Europeans and Africans, whites and Indians, or Africans and Indians. 8% are Africans. The indigenous peoples (around 800,000) live in small groups, mainly in the Amazon region (South American Indians) and their existence is threatened.

With the beginning of the colonial era, the Portuguese immigrated to Brazil. Between the end of the 16th century and 1850, 4–5.5 million African slaves were deported into the country. In the 19th century there was extensive immigration, initially from Germans and Italians, who played a leading role in the economic development of the south (Blumenau), then from Poland and others. Eastern Europeans, Arabs (Syrians and Lebanese) and Japanese. Immigration (around 5.5 million people from 1818 to 1963, including 1.63 million Italians and 310,000 Germans) has declined sharply since the 1960s. Currently, just under 0.7% of people living in Brazil were born abroad.

The average population density is low at 25 residents per km 2, but the distribution is very uneven. In the coastal states including Minas Gerais, around 87% of the total population live on 36% of the area; The highest population densities are found in the states of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo and in the northeast of the coastal strip of Pernambuco and Paraíba.

The biggest cities in Brazil

Biggest Cities (Inh. 2018)
São Paulo 12 067 400
Rio de Janeiro 6 688 900
Brasília 2,872,900
Salvador 2,856,600
Fortaleza 2,643,300

Large areas of the interior, on the other hand, are almost uninhabited, with only around 7% of the total population living in the Amazon. The proportion of the urban population increased from 45% to 86% between 1960 and 2017.

Between the upper class of large landowners and entrepreneurs and the constantly growing rural and urban lower class (favelas), a middle class (entrepreneurs in the agricultural sector, small merchants and craftsmen, skilled workers and, above all, employees in the secondary and tertiary sectors of the urban economies) is gradually developing fast in the southeast.

There is also still a strong social gap between the highly industrialized south-east and the north-east, which is one of the poorest areas in Latin America.

Religion

The constitution guarantees freedom of religion. There is no state religion; all religious communities are legally equal. Traditionally, however, the Catholic Church, as the largest religious community, has a prominent position in public life. Check shoe-wiki to see Brazil Travel Guide.

Almost 58% of the population belong to the Catholic Church, hardly less than 23% to various Protestant churches and communities. Among them, the Pentecostal churches, which are still growing particularly strongly, represent the largest group; the largest Pentecostal church in Latin America (Assembléia de Deus do Brasil) alone has around 6.5% of the population). Other (post-) Reformation churches (especially Baptists [about 2%], Adventists, Lutherans, Presbyterians) form much smaller units. Other noteworthy religious traditions are, with over 2% of the population, spiritism, which is widespread especially within the middle and upper classes, as well as the Afro-Brazilian religions (Candomblé, Macumba, Umbanda, Xango).

Religious minorities include Orthodox Christians, Anglicans, Muslims, Buddhists, and Jews. The roots of the Jewish community (centers: São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Pôrto Alegre) go back historically to the 17th century. The pre-colonial Indian religions have survived (partially) among the indigenous population. About 8–9% of Brazilians cannot be assigned to any religion.