Romania Modern History Part II

By | December 23, 2021

But if a part of the population remained in the abandoned province, why is its existence not reported in the sources for many centuries? The objection is serious; however, it loses all value when it is reflected that silence does not involve only the remaining Latin population, but the entire region and its interior events. Too far out of the interests and contacts with the Western and Byzantine world remained Dacia to attract the attention of writers, and on the other hand the peoples who dominated there did not, until relatively recently, have any culture and left no documents. of their history. How surprising that nothing is known of the subjugated Latin population, when we ignore the political organization and the extension of the dominions of the peoples who dominated the country between the century. IV and XII? The position of the Cisdanubian Latins was different, since they always remained either under the dominion or in the sphere of direct influence of the Byzantine Empire and were located on the great communication routes between the West and the East; we understand, therefore, how they were reported since the first times of the Slavic and Bulgarian invasions, noting their difference with the new immigrants and their Roman origin; all the more so since, in the century. XII and XIII, they became an important element in the political life of the Balkans. But the fact is that, due to the Magyar expansion and the German colonization in that part of ancient Dacia which was later called Transylvania, and to the establishment of Genoese colonies on the Black Sea coast between the mouth of the Danube and the Crimea, the news on the Carpathian region becomes more abundant and precise, the presence of a Latin people is reported there. For Romania 2003, please check computerannals.com.

According to supporters of the complete abandonment of Dacia, the Wallachians of the Carpathian region, which begin to be remembered in documents and historical sources of the century. XIII and on whose latinity there is no doubt (Valacchi, Vlacci, Vlach from the ancient Germanic Welsch, having passed to the Slavic languages, it means “Latin”), would be recent immigrants (peaceful immigration, which would explain the silence of the sources), who came from the Cisdanubian regions; but their opponents object that no source mentions such a migration, which for the region from which it moved could not escape the attention of the Byzantine writers, and which, on the other hand, it is unlikely that it could have been effected since the general movement invaders in those parts of Europe always happened in the opposite direction, that is, from the Transdanubian territories to those located on this side of the Danube. And that in reality they were not recent immigrants, but natives of the country, it can also be deduced from what appears in documents and historical sources that the Wallachians nowhere constitute a compact ethnic mass, but are scattered over a vast area from Transylvania to lower Moldavia, and do not constitute their own states but live subject to the domination of other peoples. Finally, many arguments are brought by linguists, especially non-Romanians, against the “theory of continuity” (see below: Language).

However, even the latter, according to which the Roman tradition and the Vlachs of the century have never failed in the territory of ancient Dacia. XIII are the descendants of the Dacolatina population that remained beyond the Danube after the withdrawal of the Roman administration does not exclude that the invasions and the long and various dominions have left traces on the ethnic structure of the country. In the thirteenth century large areas of Transylvania were already occupied by the Magyars and by Saxon colonists called by the kings of Hungary; among the Carpathians and Dnestr there were numerous Slavs; the culture that dominated there was the Greek-Byzantine; and yet these elements did not have to prevail over time, despite the fact that the first was supported by a strong political power and the second fed by the contiguity of the Slavic world, but the original Latin one, so deep had the imprint of Rome been and so vital was the indigenous population. The further history of the Carpathian region from the 13th century XIV to XIX is the story of the progressive elimination of foreign elements and influences and of the affirmation of the Romanian people first as a distinct and differentiated ethnic entity from the surrounding peoples, then as a nation. The following contributed to this evolution, which is among the most interesting in the history of modern Europe as it demonstrates what vital energy is in the Latin lineage and how much value ideas have as a generating force of nations: 1. the formation, in the sec. XIV, of two centers of Romanian political life: that of Wallachia, founded by Basarab between the Carpazî and the lower Danube, and that of Moldavia which rose further east by Bogdan.

Romania Modern History Part II