Relations between India and Pakistan

By | December 18, 2021

Relations between India and Pakistan have been conflicting since August 1947, when Islamabad was established in the Indian territories which became independent, with the aim of creating a nation for all Muslims of the Indian subcontinent. The partition process was painful and cost about half a million deaths, triggering the mass displacement of millions of people and giving rise to several territorial disputes. Among the latter, the most relevant, especially in light of the level of conflict that has arisen, is that which affects Kashmir: annexed to the Indian Union by choice of the Hindu maharaja Hari Singh who governed it, but with a Muslim majority, Kashmir. since then it has been the subject of a decades-long dispute that counts three wars (1947-48, 1965 and 1999) and the regular rekindling of episodes of violence.

However, the dispute over Kashmir is not the only one to keep relations between the two neighbors on the maximum alert level. Different and of different nature are the disputes that, opened over the years and often remained unresolved, fuel the rivalry and mutual suspicion between the two countries. Among them, the lack of agreements in the management of water resources in common, territorial disputes along the shared border, constant commercial competition and spheres of political influence in the region regularly on a collision course, especially with regard to relations with pre-Afghanistan and post Taliban. For Pakistan public policy, please check paradisdachat.com.

Systematic are also the accusations that Islamabad makes in New Delhi: to blow the fire of ethnic conflicts in Pakistani society, or to support internal irredentisms on its borders, such as that of the Balochistan region, with the aim of undermining integrity and unity of the Islamic Republic. In the same way, the Indians denounce Pakistan’s direct support for fundamentalist and jihadist groups operating in India, and suspect the direction and responsibility in the frequent terrorist attacks that over the years have bloodied Indian cities and regions. If rivalry and suspicion are rooted in the public opinion of both countries, their respective political views differ significantly: while for Islamabad the relationship with its bulky neighbor still remains at the top of foreign policy concerns, New Delhi, which is establishing itself among the protagonists of the world political and economic scene, cultivates and manages global interests that shift the focus of its range of action well beyond regional dynamics. Unlike Pakistan, India is included in the G20 of industrialized countries, sees a very large middle class improve their living conditions every year, has been recording exceptional growth rates for years and has attracted huge investments from all over the world: all data that they considerably distance both the concerns of their respective governments and the interests and responsibilities that they have to manage. which is establishing itself among the protagonists of the world political and economic scene, cultivates and manages interests of a global nature that shift the focus of its range of action well beyond regional dynamics. Unlike Pakistan, India is included in the G20 of industrialized countries, sees a very large middle class improve their living conditions every year, has been recording exceptional growth rates for years and has attracted huge investments from all over the world: all data that they considerably distance both the concerns of their respective governments and the interests and responsibilities that they have to manage. which is establishing itself among the protagonists of the world political and economic scene, cultivates and manages interests of a global nature that shift the focus of its range of action well beyond regional dynamics. Unlike Pakistan, India is included in the G20 of industrialized countries, sees a very large middle class improve their living conditions every year, has been recording exceptional growth rates for years and has attracted huge investments from all over the world: all data that they considerably distance both the concerns of their respective governments and the interests and responsibilities that they have to manage.

There are many who do not want, nor can afford, a war in the subcontinent and the pressure on the Indian government in this regard is formidable: proof of this is the fact that the 2008 bombing in Mumbai did not lead to an escalation military between the two countries, but it has only cooled the process of detente underway since the early 2000s. From the first months of 2011, the Indo-Pakistani dialogue seems to have restarted: on the tracks of the so-called ‘cricket diplomacy’, then Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani was invited to India to attend the semifinal of the cricket world cup, sport hugely popular in both countries. The election, in May 2013, of Nawaz Sharif to the post of prime minister bodes well for the resumption of dialogue between the two countries. In fact, during his first term in office, Sharif had been the architect of a rapprochement with New Delhi. However, as always, the specter of the Pakistani army looms over the actual possibilities of improvement in the future.

Pakistan Yousuf Raza Gilani