Pakistan – The Return of Benazir Bhutto

By | December 18, 2021

Added to this is the threat posed by future political elections. In this way, with the favor of the United States and Great Britain, who want to continue to ‘give Musharraf a chance’ while securing a new ally, the plan to identify Benazir Bhutto as future premier is taking shape. Bhutto has everything to please the West and the media Westerners: she is a woman, beautiful, charming, she studied abroad. She has been at the head of the country twice already: from 1988 to 1990 and from 1993 to 1996. The years of her government, in reality, are not recorded in the annals of Pakistan as examples of transparency and good governance and at home it is not much loved, not even by a large section of her party that accuses her, among other things, of the murder of her brother Murtaza, killed in 1996 by the Karachi police just while Benazir was prime minister. Even less loved is her husband Asif Zardari, known as ‘mister Ten per cent’, by Benazir placed in charge of key posts in the public administration, which he took advantage of to rake in cash and resources across the country, transferring the swag to Swiss accounts. Against Bhutto and Zardari it hangs, in Pakistan but also in Great Britain and Switzerland, a series of charges for monetary offenses and corruption. Benazir also has heavy political responsibilities: with the collaboration of the then Director General of Military Operations Musharraf and the Minister of the Interior Nasirullah Babar, the Taliban was born under his government and Osama Bin Laden was allowed to settle in Jalalabad and create Al Qaeda.¬†For Pakistan 2015, please check dentistrymyth.com.

Bhutto, exiled by the president and recycled champion of human rights and democracy, in November 2007 established an anti-Musharraf agreement in London with former premier Nawaz Sharif. The agreement does not prevent her, however, from agreeing with the hated dictator a hypothesis of ‘Pakistani democracy’: the support of the Pakistani People’s Party would ensure Musharraf’s re-election even in a non-rigged electoral competition and Bhutto could reapply to premier. Signed a ‘national reconciliation pact’ which drops all charges against him, Benazir returns to his homeland on October 18, 2007. Welcomed in Karachi by a huge crowd, on the way from the airport to his home he suffers an attack that leaves 193 on the ground. about 550 dead and injured. Bhutto claims to have been warned ‘by a friendly government’ of the possibility of attempts on her life and that she will reveal to the government a shortlist of three names among which the instigators of the attack she escaped must be searched for. The names, circulated in the following days by the Pakistani newspaper on the way from the airport to his home he suffers an attack that leaves 193 dead and 550 injured on the ground.

Bhutto claims to have been warned ‘by a friendly government’ of the possibility of attempts on her life and that she will reveal to the government a shortlist of three names among which the instigators of the attack she escaped must be searched for. The names, circulated in the following days by the Pakistani newspaper on the way from the airport to his home he suffers an attack that leaves 193 dead and 550 injured on the ground. Bhutto claims that she was warned by a friendly government of the possibility of attempts on her life and that she will reveal to the government a shortlist of three names among which the instigators of the attack she escaped must be searched for. The names, circulated in the following days by the Pakistani newspaper The News, would be those of the prime minister of Sindh, Arbab Ghulam Rahim, the prime minister of Punjab, Chaudry Perwez Elahi, and the former head of the Intelligence Bureau, Eijaz Shah. They are not the only ones, however, who want Benazir dead: the list should be added to the former supporters of the late dictator Zia, the Taliban, the extremists of Waziristan and some elements of the Muttahida Qaumi movement, the more or less deviant secret services and the government itself.. Despite this, Bhutto continues to appear in public, trying to gain popular acclaim. Her return to Pakistan, strongly desired by Western countries and above all by the United States, has in fact alienated many sympathies even among the moderates and risks turning into a boomerang with unpredictable effects.

Pakistan Benazir Bhutto