Netherlands Music

By | December 1, 2021

Of the Flemish masters who in the 15th and 16th centuries. they left a fundamental imprint in the history of European music, only a few were born within the borders of today’s Netherlands. Among these are the polyphonists J. Obrecht, who together with J. Ockeghem is the greatest exponent of the second Flemish period in which the technique of counterpoint was developed to the highest degree and, probably, J. Clemens. At the turn of the 16th and 17th centuries. lived JP Sweelinck, a more strictly Dutch composer: his instrumental compositions are particularly remarkable, representing an essential moment in the evolution from sixteenth-century research to fugue. His contemporaries were C. Schuyt, J. Tollius and J. Vredeman. After Sweelinck’s death there is a decline in Dutch cultured music. The flourishing of popular music, on the other hand, continues, of which a valuable collection remains, such as that of war songs contained in the chronicle Valerius Gedenckclanck (1626), which also includes the Dutch national anthem Wilhelmus van Nassauwe (ca. 1570). For Netherlands 2014, please check thesciencetutor.org.

In the 17th and 18th centuries. the Netherlands did not contribute much to European musical life; well-known luthiers were in the 17th century. H. Jacobsz and the Cuypers, builders of grandiose carillons Netherlands and F. Hemonie, while the art of organ building was also particularly widespread in this period. French and Italian opera companies prevented with their successful activity the birth of a national opera theater, despite some attempts made by C. Hacquart and S. de Koning. In the first half of the 19th century. the composers J. Schenk, Netherlands Hellendaal, JG Bertelman, JB van Bree had some renown. An intensification of musical production began in 1850; under the influence of the German romantics, wrote J. Verhulst, R. Hol, WFG Nicolai, C. van Rennes, C. van Tussenbroek, JPJ Wierts, authors who mainly cultivated the Lied. Larger music composed by B. Zweers, J. Wagenaar and A. Diependrock, who is considered the leading Dutch musician after Sweelinck. Next to these are S. and D. de Lange, D. Schafer, J. Röntgen, Netherlands van Anrooy, H. Zagwijn, C. Dopper, R. Mengelberg. Twentieth-century musical trends, from Debussy onwards, influence the works of S. Dresden, B. van den Sigtenhorst Meijer, W. Landré, H. Bosmans, A. Voormolen, B. van Dieren, D. Ruyneman, M. Monnikendam and W. Pijper, author of music in polyrhythmic and polytonal writing which assured him the authority of a school leader among numerous students.

In the field of musical performances, the Netherlands enjoy an excellent reputation. Already in 1591 the Society of Santa Cecilia was founded in Arnhem, which still exists today; in 1621 the Collegium musicum of Utrecht was built, from which the orchestra of that city was formed, today known for a great festival of ancient music; a musical chamber was established in Amsterdam in 1624. The Society for the Advancement of Music has had great merit since its foundation in 1829. Among the current musical ensembles the most important is the orchestra of the Royal Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, of which W. Mengelberg, R. Chailly (from 1988) and M. Jansons (from 2004) have been conductors for fifty years.

Netherlands Music