Myanmar Arts

By | November 16, 2021

Myanmar, Burma, Burma, officially Pyidaungsu Myanmar Naingngandaw, German Republic of the Union of Myanmar, state in the northwest of the Southeast Asian mainland (rear India) with (2018) 53.7 million residents; The capital is Naypyidaw.

Burmese

Burmese, Burmese, Burmese Bamar [bə ma ː ], with approx. 68% of the total population, the ethnic majority in Myanmar (Burma), 35 million people.

The Burmese largely determine the country’s politics, culture and development. They are descendants of Tibetan Burmese groups who immigrated in several waves during the 1st millennium AD from northern China via Yunnan to the Irrawaddyplain and made the dry zone south of what is now Mandalay their core area. Inspired by Indian culture, largely conveyed through the civilizations of the Mon and the Pyu, they developed a high Buddhist culture from the 11th century. They were able to finally assert their dominance in the central basin of the Irrawaddy and Sittang in the middle of the 16th century against the Shan and in the middle of the 18th century against the Mon. They mainly inhabit the fertile lowlands. The Burmese are over 95% Theravada Buddhists.

  • Myanmar is a country starting with M. Check COUNTRYAAH to find other countries that also begin with letter M.

Burmese art

Burmese art, term for Burmese architecture and visual arts, which is derived from the achievements of the Pyu (especially in architecture and sculpture) and the Mon (especially in literature and painting) and their further development in the empire of Pagan under the leadership of the Bamar (11th – 13th centuries).

As a specifically Burmese form in sacred architecture, the Upper Burmese stupa was created with high square terraces, ringed bell, rising turban, concluding banana bud, umbrella and the reliquary moved inside (e.g. Shwezigon Pagoda in Pagan, 1059; 1084–1112 expanded), as well as the multi-level temple, where the massive base has been replaced by the hall with the central Buddha statue, niches and walkways (e.g. Ananda Temple in Pagan, 1066–90; Thatbyinnyu Temple, mid-12th century). Architectural perfection, especially the vaulting technique inherited from the Pyu, was no longer achieved in the post-pagan period (1287–1885). In Unterbirma, the stupa, based on the model of the Mon, with its more flowing forms remained predominant (Shwedagon Pagoda in Rangoon, 16th – 18th centuries, on a previous building). With basically the same structure, sacred buildings can be very diverse and develop regionally specific shapes (e.g. in the Rakhin state the dome-shaped bell; in the Shan region the slender, rising shape of stupas). Painting, represented in Pagan by wall paintings of Jatakas in temples such as the Abae-yadana (11th century), Gugyaukkyi, Lokatheippan (both 12th century), took off from the 17th century as wall, handwriting and lacquer painting, mainly on Buddhist topics or court life. The traditional arts such as stone and wood carving, bronze and wood sculpture, bell casting, gold and silversmithing and others also experienced a renaissance. With basically the same structure, sacred buildings can be very diverse and develop regionally specific shapes (e.g. in the Rakhin state the dome-shaped bell; in the Shan region the slender, rising shape of stupas). Painting, represented in Pagan by wall paintings of Jatakas in temples such as the Abae-yadana (11th century), Gugyaukkyi, Lokatheippan (both 12th century), took off from the 17th century as wall, handwriting and lacquer painting, mainly on Buddhist topics or court life. The traditional arts such as stone and wood carving, bronze and wood sculpture, bell casting, gold and silversmithing and others also experienced a renaissance. With basically the same structure, sacred buildings can be very diverse and develop regionally specific shapes (e.g. in the Rakhin state the dome-shaped bell; in the Shan region the slender, rising shape of stupas). Painting, represented in Pagan by wall paintings of Jatakas in temples such as the Abae-yadana (11th century), Gugyaukkyi, Lokatheippan (both 12th century), took off from the 17th century as wall, handwriting and lacquer painting, mainly on Buddhist topics or court life. The traditional arts such as stone and wood carving, bronze and wood sculpture, bell casting, gold and silversmithing and others also experienced a renaissance. Represented in Pagan by wall paintings of Jatakas in temples such as Abae-yadana (11th century), Gugyaukkyi, Lokatheippan (both 12th century), from the 17th century a new upswing as wall, manuscript and lacquer painting, predominantly increased Buddhist themes or court life. The traditional arts such as stone and wood carving, bronze and wood sculpture, bell casting, gold and silversmithing and others also experienced a renaissance. Represented in Pagan by wall paintings of Jatakas in temples such as Abae-yadana (11th century), Gugyaukkyi, Lokatheippan (both 12th century), from the 17th century a new upswing as wall, manuscript and lacquer painting, predominantly increased Buddhist themes or court life. The traditional arts such as stone and wood carving, bronze and wood sculpture, bell casting, gold and silversmithing and others also experienced a renaissance.

Modern painters seek to combine Western styles and forms of expression with traditional elements and content. Particularly well-known are the pioneers of modern painting U Ba Nyan (* 1897, † 1945) as well as U Ngwe Gaing (* 1901, † 1967), U Aung Khin (* 1921, † 1996) and U Minn Wae Aung (* 1960). Stimulated by increasing tourism towards the end of the 20th century, folk art, v. a. the almost disappeared marionette art, buoyancy. The cultivation of the traditional arts finds sustainable state funding in the pursuit of preservation of the cultural specifics (the cultural university in Rangoon was opened in 1993).

Myanmar Arts