Montenegro Culture of Business

By | July 24, 2022

Subchapters:

  • Introduction
  • Addressing
  • Business Meeting
  • Communication
  • Recommendations
  • Public Holidays

Introduction

Certain differences compared to the Czech Republic are in the freer perception of time, more expressive rhetoric (including repeated mention of personal contacts with politicians, which in some cases is of a rather hypothetical nature). The emphasis is on personal contact, it is advisable to invite your partner to the Czech Republic. It is also recommended to check whether the other party is proceeding according to the agreement (you have to take into account the pressures to postpone problems, which as a result can mean significant delays in joint projects). Partial differences can also occur in the expressions of strongly religious Orthodox partners.

Addressing

Montenegrin partners prefer personal contact and expect those interested in establishing business relations to appear in person.

Business meeting

Montenegro is a young independent state, with little competition in trade and economy. Business negotiations take place in the same way throughout the territory, but there are noticeable differences between the north and south of the country, between the central and coastal areas. The payment morale of Montenegrin economic entities is problematic. You should be careful in negotiations. Do not trust dubious companies and individuals who “can arrange everything and have contacts everywhere”. Do not underestimate Montenegrin partners. They are attentive at meetings, easily promise cooperation, but implementation is slow, often delayed for no reason. Inflating prices is understood as frivolous conduct. Montenegrin partners often come to meetings well informed about your products, your prices and the prices of your competitors. The Montenegrin market is small, promising, but requires patience. When presenting technologies, works and products are also expected to be offered for financing (banks, funds). Advance payments are not recommended. Successful negotiations often take place at a so-called working lunch or dinner. An informal invitation to lunch or dinner may also follow the negotiations, which is not refused.

Communication

Although Montenegrin partners often declare that they are able to communicate in English or Russian, it is better to have an interpreter to/from the Montenegrin (or Serbian) language with you. It is definitely better to communicate directly/in person, not to rely on communication via email or phone. There are no explicit communication taboos.

Recommendation

Before negotiations with Montenegrin partners, it is a good idea to contact the PaulTrade office in Montenegro and ask for references on the company with which the negotiations are to take place. There is also the possibility of inviting a PaulTrade representative to the meeting itself.

Public Holidays

New Year: January 1-2

Orthodox Christmas: 6-8. January

Labor Day: May 1

Independence Day: May 21

National Day: July 13

(a large part of Montenegrin Muslims observe Ramadan/Eid)

Statni holidays are celebrated for 2 days, if the second day of the holiday is a Sunday, the following Monday is non-working, and Tuesdays, if the second day of the holiday is a Saturday, the non-working day is Monday.

Introduction

For the purposes of dealing with Montenegrins, it is possible to state that local customs do not differ much from Czech ones. There are certain differences in the freer perception of time, more expressive rhetoric (including repeated mention of personal contacts with politicians, which in some cases is of a rather hypothetical nature). The emphasis is on personal contact, it is advisable to invite your partner to the Czech Republic. It is also recommended to check whether the other party is proceeding according to the agreement (you have to take into account the pressures to postpone issues, which can result in significant delays in joint projects). Partial differences can also occur in the expressions of strongly religious Orthodox partners. Social culture is relatively close to the Czech Republic. Although the Balkan region is different from our habits in many ways, in most cases these differences are surmountable.

Addressing

The first contact can be made via email, however, Montenegrin partners prefer personal contact and expect those interested in establishing business relations to come in person. Although many Montenegrin companies are able to negotiate in English, it is better to have an interpreter from/to the Montenegrin language or, ideally, a person with a local contact or a local partner.

Business meeting

Montenegro is a young independent state, with little competition in trade and economy. Business negotiations take place in a similar way throughout the territory, but there are noticeable differences between the north and the south of the country, between the central and coastal areas. The payment morale of Montenegrin economic entities is problematic. You should be careful in negotiations. Do not trust dubious companies and individuals who “can arrange everything and have contacts everywhere”. Do not underestimate Montenegrin partners. They are attentive at meetings, easily promise cooperation, but implementation is slow, often delayed for no reason. Inflating prices is understood as frivolous conduct. Montenegrin partners often come to meetings well informed about your products, your prices and the prices of your competitors. The Montenegrin market is small, promising, but requires patience. When presenting technologies, works and products are also expected to be offered for financing (banks, funds). Advance payments are not recommended. Successful negotiations often take place at a so-called working lunch or dinner. An informal invitation to lunch or dinner may also follow the negotiations, which is not refused.

The timing of the meeting does not matter. There is a certain degree of informality during the meeting, there is rarely any talk, meetings start and end very informally. It is not excluded that emotions, traditional friendship between countries or the relationship with the Czech Republic will be referred to during negotiations, but this has no real impact on business. Serving or consuming alcohol during meetings is not an exception, it is rather a tradition and it is not entirely appropriate to refuse brandy at a successful meeting. There is also a certain informality in terms of dress during meetings, and the format of the negotiation team is not discussed at all – Montenegrins usually come to the meeting with an escort.

Communication

Although Montenegrin partners often declare that they are able to communicate in English or Russian, it is better to have an interpreter to/from the Montenegrin (or Serbian) language with you. It is definitely better to communicate directly/in person, not to rely on communication via email or phone. Visit Aparentingblog for more information about Montenegro culture and traditions.

There are no explicit communication taboos, but a certain degree of prudence is needed on political, ethnic and religious topics.

Recommendation

Before negotiating with Montenegrin partners, it is a good idea to contact the PaulTrade office in Montenegro and ask for references on the company with which the negotiations are to take place. There is also the possibility of inviting a PaulTrade representative to the meeting itself.

Public Holidays

List of public holidays:

New Year: January 1-2

Orthodox Christmas: 6-8. January

Labor Day: May 1

Independence Day: May 21

National Day: July 13

(a large part of Montenegrin Muslims observe Ramadan/Eid),

Christmas 24 and 25.12. in Montenegro, they are not considered holidays that a significant part of the population would celebrate, so it is not unusual for Montenegrins to offer negotiations, for example, in this period before the New Year holidays.

Statni holidays are celebrated for 2 days, if the second day of the holiday is Sunday, the following Monday is non-working and Tuesday, if the second day of the holiday is Saturday, Monday is non-working. The months of July and August (especially in the civil service) are taken as months of collective leave. A number of subjects connect the New Year with the Orthodox Christmas, often also with the winter holidays.

Montenegro Culture of Business